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Diamond
05-05-2010, 06:20 PM
Just messin' around, trying to come up with something halfway cool looking.

Diamond
05-05-2010, 10:16 PM
More messing around. I think I like this look better. And still plenty of room left for loads and loads of text.

alizarine
05-05-2010, 11:15 PM
That's a great map. Love the asteroid belt/dust cloud. One this is that it doesn't seem to be to scale? It doesn't have to be, of course, it's up to you. The sun just feels a bit off and I'm visualizing the planets knocking into each other a bit during orbit. Looking forward to some labels on there once you've finalized something you like ^.^

- Alizarine

Diamond
05-06-2010, 12:54 AM
Oh, it's definitely not to scale. I had the same thought about the planets knocking into each other - billiards! :D

I worked hard to get an asteroid belt that I liked, so thanks.

What I'll probably end up doing is just a line diagram type of thing for the planetary orbits, with very small colored spheres to represent the planets, then have boxes on the sidebars showing the pictures of the individual planets, moons, artificial stuff, etc.

alizarine
05-06-2010, 01:15 AM
That would actually look totally brilliant. The scale thing isn't a problem - just my second thought, right after "wow" ^.^ Just out of curiosity, the first map shows more elliptical orbits (most probably due to the angle) while the second shows very circular orbits. Are the orbits really circular? I know Earth has a somewhat elliptical orbit which, I think, gives us seasons? I might be off - my brain's not totally awake right now. Anyways, good luck with this!

- Alizarine

plamadude30k
05-06-2010, 01:38 AM
That would actually look totally brilliant. The scale thing isn't a problem - just my second thought, right after "wow" ^.^ Just out of curiosity, the first map shows more elliptical orbits (most probably due to the angle) while the second shows very circular orbits. Are the orbits really circular? I know Earth has a somewhat elliptical orbit which, I think, gives us seasons? I might be off - my brain's not totally awake right now. Anyways, good luck with this!

- Alizarine

The ellipticity of earth's orbit is almost zero (but not quite). Seasons come from the fact that earth's axis of rotation is tilted relative to to the sun's by about 23 degrees, not (as most people think) from the ellipticity. The orbital eccentricity has a very small effect on seasons, making northern seasons milder and southern seasons harsher, but this is a tiny effect.

Oh, and before I get carried away with my astrophysics, nicely done Diamond. Have you given thought to how the asteroid belt would arise in the system? In our solar system, the asteroid belt exists because it is in an orbital resonance with Jupiter, which prevents planet formation in that range.

Diamond
05-06-2010, 02:02 AM
That would actually look totally brilliant. The scale thing isn't a problem - just my second thought, right after "wow" ^.^ Just out of curiosity, the first map shows more elliptical orbits (most probably due to the angle) while the second shows very circular orbits. Are the orbits really circular? I know Earth has a somewhat elliptical orbit which, I think, gives us seasons? I might be off - my brain's not totally awake right now. Anyways, good luck with this!

- Alizarine
That's why I originally started with kind of a three-quarters view, so you could see the orbital tilt/etc. When I actually sit down and start working on this in earnest, I'll come up with some way to accurately show the orbits.

The ellipticity of earth's orbit is almost zero (but not quite). Seasons come from the fact that earth's axis of rotation is tilted relative to to the sun's by about 23 degrees, not (as most people think) from the ellipticity. The orbital eccentricity has a very small effect on seasons, making northern seasons milder and southern seasons harsher, but this is a tiny effect.

Oh, and before I get carried away with my astrophysics, nicely done Diamond. Have you given thought to how the asteroid belt would arise in the system? In our solar system, the asteroid belt exists because it is in an orbital resonance with Jupiter, which prevents planet formation in that range.
Didn't really give much thought as to why anything was where it was. This is just to test styles and ideas. I'm no astrophysicist or astronomer though, so expect all kinds of errors in the eventual actual map/diagram. :D

plamadude30k
05-06-2010, 02:26 AM
Fair enough! As a purely artistic endeavor, I think it looks awesome. If you want any sciencey pointers, I'd be more than happy to advise (it is more or less what I do), but be forewarned-my inner geek is rarely more nit-picky than when it comes to this subject. Actually, you're probably better off without that kind of input. Let your creativity go wild, it's more fun that way.

Daelin
05-06-2010, 02:53 AM
Gah, you've somehow managed to get a better-looking asteroid field than me, with probably half the effort. Now I'll have to go back and redo it. :)
Excellent work, by the way.

tilt
05-06-2010, 02:54 AM
looks really good, and I think the circles work just fine, one sees it as a representation of the system and will instantly understand that it is not to scale. The colored planets could need some more play/movement in the colors, they are too uniform. If you work in photoshop, you could use the "cloud"-filter to achieve that :)

someguy
05-06-2010, 03:46 AM
Only one kibits...

The shadows on the planets are not facing away from the sun.

tilt
05-06-2010, 03:49 AM
good spot someguy - yes the shadows should reflect where the planet is in comparison to the sun. And one more thing I believe would add to the overall look. The stars in the background are to uniform, make some dark spaces in between... it is after all.. space ;)

Diamond
05-06-2010, 09:13 PM
@someguy: Yep. This is just a test really to see how things might look. I knew about the shadows, I just didn't bother flipping the planets around to show correct placement. :p

@plamadude: I might take you up on your offer, but if I cry uncle, don't be surprised... :D

@Daelin: It was pretty easy to make:
3 layers:

1st (bottom layer) - make a circle, fill with black, then contract and delete the inside depending on how thick (roughly) you want your Belt to be.
2nd (middle layer) - Filter-->Clouds-->Difference Clouds (10 or so times), I used a slate blue and a very light gray. Ctrl-click on your 1st layer, inverse, feather to preference, delete.
3rd (top layer) - just brushes and layer styles. I used one of the standard CS stipple brushes, sized it up to around 40 or 50 pixels, and just layed down some 'asteroids' roughly following the ring from layer 1. I used two colors, a gray and a brown. Then I did Layer Style-->Bevel&Emboss and played around until I found a setting I liked, then Pattern Overlay, just something simple to give it a bit of texture, faded down to 20 or 25% opacity.

I went back then and deleted the darker blues out of my 2nd(clouds) layer, to give the appearance of ragged spots and holes. Then I deleted the 1st layer with the black ring in it. And that was pretty much it. It's really simple to do and looks pretty good, it just took several hours of trial and error to stumble on a style that I thought looked nice...

@tilt: Not sure what you mean by the colors looking too uniform. Do you mean from planet to planet? If that's the case, don't worry, I plan to change things up on color schemes when I get going on the actual map.

tilt
05-07-2010, 01:38 AM
no, if you take the purple planet - its the same shade all over - I would like to see some lines/spots/specks/dots/stribes... :) ... look at jupitor and saturn for inspiration :)

Diamond
05-07-2010, 01:21 PM
no, if you take the purple planet - its the same shade all over - I would like to see some lines/spots/specks/dots/stribes... :) ... look at jupitor and saturn for inspiration :)

Oh, okay, gotcha. Although it's just as likely that there's gas giants out there with nice, clean, uniform color striations too... :D

plamadude30k
05-07-2010, 01:29 PM
Oh, okay, gotcha. Although it's just as likely that there's gas giants out there with nice, clean, uniform color striations too... :D

Actually, there are. Class III Gas Giants are basically featureless. All of the cool looking stuff on Jupiter and Saturn are Ammonia clouds in the upper atmosphere. Planets like Uranus don't really have many clouds in their 'atmospheres,' so they look featureless. Not purple, though, usually blue. However, you can have a large purple-ish object if you up the mass quite a bit to a T-type brown dwarf. Actually, they're magenta, but the color is close to what you have. It's probably just 20-50 times as massive as Jupiter.

Look here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudarsky_extrasolar_planet_classification) for gas giant types.

tilt
05-07-2010, 01:29 PM
sure, by they don't look as cool ;)

Diamond
05-07-2010, 08:42 PM
Yeah, I'll be going more for pretty than for scientifically accurate. ;)

rdanhenry
05-07-2010, 09:17 PM
There's a complex molecule in the atmosphere, in a small amount, but enough to change the color from the standard hue. Anyone who won't accept that justification should stay away from science fiction in the first place.

alizarine
05-07-2010, 10:48 PM
heh. That's an excellent explanation - we only know the science we've been exposed to (bad way to put it, but I'm not a scientist ^.^ ) Anyways, if you're going to be mapping any of these planets individually, like continents and stuff, and you have photoshop, you can use the 3d sphere mapping to get 3d spheres ( o.O ) with the world-map projected on it. That could take a bit (a lot) of work, but it would look really nice. Obviously gas-giant planets probably wouldn't have a world-map, but you're planets so far would do a great job as gas-giants (with a bit of tweaking, as you mentioned you'll be doing). Dunno if you want to go into that much detail, mapping each planet then creating a 3d sphere projection, but it's an option ^__^ If this is just a test run, I'm really looking forward to the final. Good luck!

- Alizarine