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Fuse
07-01-2010, 11:32 AM
So as the title says I'm a first time DM.. well maybe I ran one game before, but at any rate, I'm new to this.
I've played quite a few games, but I'd really like to try my hand at running one.

So I've made some maps, got quest ideas written, a few magical items created, and a general idea of how things could go.
What I'm interested in is organization. Say for instance.. encounters, treasure, and events. I was thinking of making notecards with encounters/groups written on them so that when an encounter happens I can pull from my pre-made list of critters instead of thumbing through the monster manual to find something.. or coming up with something on the fly.

Does this sound like the way to go? I really want to be on top of things, because in many.. MANY games that I have played, there were long delays and pauses for the DM to 'figure things out'. If I get a new player interested.. I don't want them to fall asleep of boredom haha.

So basically I was thinking of doing the same thing for treasures, and events too. Treasures aren't that big a deal.. I can come up with that easily on the fly. It'd be nice I suppose to have some pre-gen stuff though just to be prepared. Also traps - it would be nice to mark my map with a symbol to denote a trap and just be able to pull a trap card from my notecards instead of devising something on the spot.

Well, if anyone has any other organizational tips for making the game go smoothly and quickly - in all the right places - let me know!

Thanks!

Greason Wolfe
07-01-2010, 11:43 AM
Ahhh, I remember those days when I was new to being a GM. What fun they were.

The note cards are a great idea, especially for random encounters. Although, when I set up my random encounter tables, I often included more specific notes (i.e. Hit Points and damage for "monsters" and the like). For "planned" encounters (i.e. dungeon delving) I would do a full write-up of the dungeon (cavern, castle, etc.) that included a "visible" description (what the characters saw) a "hidden" description (things like secret and/or concealed doors), any "monsters" encountered and any treasure that might be found. The other thing I would include, or at least bring to the table, was a quick reference sheet with any special notes about skill/stat checks and initiative factors that might play a key role in any possible encounters. Of course, there will always be those "what if" moments when you'll have to look something up, but those can't be helped other than to familiarize yourself with where the "rules" are for those moments in the various guides. It's also helpful to have a quick reference for the characters as well, including spells, special abilities (feats) and the like. There is no way to be 100 percent prepared for any possibility in the gaming session, but every little bit helps, and it sounds like you've already got a couple good ideas in the basket. The best thing I can suggest, in the long run, is to think of those things that were time consuming (at the table) when you were a player, and try to prepare for them.

GW

Xyll
07-01-2010, 11:58 AM
Do not forget a list of random names and if possible short descriptions. Also remember to go with the flow and have fun if they want to do something crazy then give them a chance. Players will either follow the plot like sheep or blow up the whole thing just remember to have fun doing either.

tilt
07-01-2010, 12:33 PM
yep.. pre-generated stuff is a must. I usually index the monsters manual for relevant monsters, or plain print the monsters stat on paper for easy reference. The same goes for NPC's, and the really complex NPC's I generate in Wizards Character generator and print them with powers and all (I play 4e).
The treasure is always written up in advance too - cause I don't want to slow down the game by starting to roll on tables. AND sometimes you want your players to find neat stuff. Remember placing a cool bow on a npc some sessions ago - unfortunatly for the Ranger in the group - he got away *lol*
A DM screen can also be a nice thing - and you can make your own if you haven't bought one - just write up important info and print those and use a binder or two for the screen. And of course nice battle maps and tokens for traps and ALL the monsters (with pictures) that makes the game so much more fun :)

good luck from a 30 year GM'ing guy :)

Midgardsormr
07-01-2010, 01:13 PM
I highly recommend subscribing to Johnn Four's e-zine Roleplaying Tips (http://www.roleplayingtips.com) and the yahoogroup that goes along with it. And spend some time in the archives occasionally—there are literally hundreds of great tips on game prep and organization.

I have a notecard for each combatant I anticipate needing in a game. The card has all of the relevant combat data, a space to mark initiative, and a space for keeping track of hit points and conditions on one side. If it's an antagonist, the reverse side has the experience point value of the NPC/creature and a list of its belongings. If it's a PC's card, it has my notes about what treasure I've given to that PC so far (in order to keep rewards level for all PCs). When a battle begins, I put the notecards in order by initiative and simply go down through the stack as the combat progresses. As the baddies are defeated, I hand the cards to whoever is tracking rewards. I also make cards for each magic item, treasure cache, and formal quest. If it has a reward attached to it, it gets a card. This (almost) completely eliminates my need to track treasure or experience during game time. The less paperwork I have to do at the table, the faster and more fun things tend to be. These notecards are stored in a small notecard box with internal dividers. PCs go in a section by themselves, and the other cards are divided into encounter sets.

I do all of my map and visual aid management on a notebook computer attached via HDMI to the television. I use MapTool to display the map and character tokens, allowing the players to see an obscured map and me to see the full map on the notebook's screen. This allows me to use good, full color maps without the cost of having them printed or buying minis, plus I get MapTool's fog-of-war and line-of-sight tools, which are much better than trying to cover the parts of a physical map that haven't been visited yet.

I preroll initiative for every monster and NPC, so the only cards I have to put in order at the start of combat are the PCs'. Let's see… I have two large 3-ring binders for each campaign. One is for the players' use, where they can take their notes and I can pass them world and rules information. The other is my GM's binder, which has the following sections:

PC Record sheets. I have a slash pocket where I store all of the original character records. If the players want to keep their sheet, they get a scanned copy. This ensures that I have the most up-to-date information on each character and there is no doctoring going on between sessions. (I haven't had a problem with that, ever, but I've gamed with people who have.)
The current session's script. Here's where I keep the meat of my plot. All of the relevant factions' likely actions are listed here, along with whatever events I have planned and scripts and characterization notes for NPC dialogue. I also have a list of planned encounters with a potential reward tally so that I can make sure I'm on track with XP and treasure rewards. If I'm running a module, I list the changes I have made to each of the module's encounters.
Session notes. Everything that I want to remember for the future goes into this section as it happens. No organization, just quick notes and details that I'll organize later in my post-game time (no more than a day or two after the session, while it's all still fresh in my mind). I keep this information in the binder until prep time for the next game, when I look it over then discard it.
Story notes. My relationship map for all NPCs and factions goes in this section, along with notes on long-range plots. Only things that are fact—histories, goals, and current events—go in this section. Potentialities go in my planning section.
NPCs. Every NPC the PCs encounter gets an entry, with personality notes at the very least. Important characters may get an entire page. A throwaway shopkeeper gets a single line.
Locations. Every location the PCs go to or hear of gets an entry. I'll list the filenames for any maps I use, the location key (if I have one), NPCs at this location, and any other pertinent data. Usually each location gets a page of its own to leave plenty of room for expansion from later visits.
PCs. Backstory and character history, along with my notes for personal sub-plots.
Treasure. I keep a page for each character to track what treasure they've been awarded and any items on their wishlists. I also have a few sessions' worth of treasure to be handed out, where I've seeded it, and who it's intended for. In addition, I keep notes on any legendary equipment that I've alluded to in here, along with random objects the PCs might encounter. This can be very helpful when it comes time to improvise.
Rules. Complete house rules, if I'm running with them. Also, reference charts for things that come up but I don't necessarily want to delve into the books for—conditions, diseases, poisons, suggested difficulty ratings for various endeavours, experience charts, and the like. These are things that are handy to have at my fingertips but not necessary to have in front of me at all times.
Planning. This section is for long-range planning. Things that I want to have happen but aren't likely to occur in the next session will go here. The overall plot of the campaign, along with notes on how to keep it on track in light of whatever unexpected things the PCs have been doing. World events outside of the PCs' control. Other potential story arcs and sub-plots. Worldbuilding information that hasn't been revealed yet (so it can still be changed if necessary). This section is likely to be the most chaotic, but it's also the place I'm likely to spend most of my time when I'm not prepping for an immediate game. This is the meat and potatoes of my personal gaming experience—the part that I enjoy the most as a gamemaster.
Supplies. Notebook paper, graph paper, empty sheet protectors, a couple of empty slash pockets, and a pouch containing enough pencils for all of my players and myself, a set of dice, and some blank note cards.


Yes, I spend a lot of time on my prep work, but it's the part of the game I enjoy the most, so that's okay.

tilt
07-01-2010, 02:18 PM
thats damn impressive... I'm more of the improvise and adapt type GM *lol*

NeonKnight
07-01-2010, 03:07 PM
Well, first question: What Version are we talking here?

1rst & 2nd D&D, Stat Blocks were sooooooooooooooooo easy (Orc: AC 7; HP 8; #AT 1; THACO 19; DMG 1d8+1) Sooooooooooooo Easy.

Then Came 3rd Edition with it's BIG ASS TAKE UP THREE PAGES FOR SOME MONSTERS STAT BLOCKS!

ORC; War1, Med Humanoid (Orc)
HD 1d8+1 (5hp); Init +1; Speed 30
AC 13 (+3 studded leather armor), touch 10, flat-footed 13
Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+4
Attack: Falchion +4 melee (2d4+4/18-20) or javelin +1 ranged (1d6+3)
Full Attack: Falchion +4 melee (2d4+4/18-20) or javelin +1 ranged (1d6+3)
Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft.
SA—; SQ: Darkvision 60 ft., light sensitivity
Saves: Fort +3, Ref +0, Will -2
Abilities: Str 17, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 8, Wis 7, Cha 6
Skills: Listen +1, Spot +1; Feats: Alertness

*Phew!!*

Finally in 4th Edition Stat blocks are again, somewhat large, but not the huge monstrosities of the previous edition:

Orc Raider
Medium natural humanoid, orc
Level 3 Skirmisher XP 150
Initiative +5 Senses Perception +1; low-light vision
HP 46; Bloodied 23
AC 17; Fortitude 15, Reflex 14, Will 12
Speed 6 (8 while charging)
Basic Melee: Greataxe (standard, at-will) Weapon
+8 vs AC; 1d12+3 damage (crit 1d12+15).
Ranged Handaxe (standard, at-will) Weapon
Ranged 5/10; +7 vs AC; 1d6+3 damage.
Melee Warrior's Surge (standard, usable only while bloodied, encounter) Healing, Weapon
The orc raider makes a melee basic attack, spends a healing surge, and regains 10 hit points..
Killer’s Eye
When making a ranged attack, the orc raider ignores cover and concealment (but not total concealment) if the target is within 5 squares of it.
Alignment Chaotic evil Languages Common, Giant
Skills Endurance +8, Intimidate +5
Str 17 (+4) Dex 15 (+3) Wis 10 (+1)
Con 14 (+3) Int 8 (0) Cha 9 (0)
Equipment: greataxe , handaxe x4, leather armor .

Still a bit big compared to 1rst/2nd but.....for some monsters a lot more controllable.

With that known, Most encounters in 4th can be written on a single sheet of Letter (A4) paper, double sided at times, with all the relevant info (stats, monsters, encounter map, etc).

But then I am a bit of a control freak when it comes to my games. With the new minis from WotC, they all come with little cards with all their stats on them. Speaking of which I am SOooooooooooooooo glad I got my hands on this bad boy:)

http://www.shopofmagic.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=173:new-dad-miniatures-huge-figure-in-june&catid=39:product-spotlight&Itemid=58

Fuse
07-01-2010, 03:11 PM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I do have another slight issue though.
I am without a DM's guide or screen.. which isn't really that big a deal I suppose, but to make the game run smoother it would surely help.
Haha, it's funny because the books I do have - don't match. I have a 3e monster manual and a 2e players handbook. Meh, go figure. I haven't played enough 3e to be comfortable enough to DM a 3e game.

Long story short, along the way all the other books I acquired have been stolen or lost.

Anyway, I'm not sure if it's an issue, but if someone knows of a place where I can get a printable DM screen for 2e that would be great. I don't even care if it's some home-brew thing. Otherwise it's time to hit up ebay for some books :D

Thank you, fellow dungeon crawlers.

Midgardsormr
07-01-2010, 03:45 PM
thats damn impressive... I'm more of the improvise and adapt type GM *lol*

Well that's just the thing: With the style of prep that I use, I can wing it much more successfully if the players do something unexpected. Although my anticipated session is very tightly scripted, I have enough information available that if the PCs go off the rails, I can adapt and keep the game running with a minimum of fuss. Since I started this system, I've only had to halt the game for planning a couple of times. At least one of those was because I was using an experimental home-brew system that wasn't working the way I had intended (and it never did—near total failure), so it shouldn't even really count.

Prior to making my binders, I was always having to scramble to keep up with sudden changes, and I sometimes really flubbed the difficulty level of an encounter. Also, I handed out far too much treasure because I wasn't accurately tracking what I was doing. However, my style isn't for everybody. I happen to really love the prep part of gamemastering, so it's not really much of a burden to do it this way.

tilt
07-01-2010, 04:49 PM
yeah.. its all that preptime that'll take it out of me :)

@fuse - nope... looked around and couldn't find any downloads for 2e any longer... not even on wizards page with free old stuff, so you'd better photocopy some pages instead :)

Iapetus
07-02-2010, 01:59 AM
http://www.wizards.com/dnd/Tools.aspx

That's a link to Wizard's tools section of the site. There's a monster builder available to download free (it's a beta version), and I have it and it's really helpful to me as a new DM. Of course, this is for 4e, so if you're doing 2e I'm not sure how helpful it would be.

tilt
07-02-2010, 02:22 AM
the monster builder is really cool and so is the character builder - but as Iapetus says for a 4e game :) ... but the good old monster manuals are great too :) Although you'll have some conversion to do if you have a 3e monster and a 2e players book ... I'd think about upgrading your game to 3.5e or Pathfinder (also 3.5 as far as I know) or 4e. Then again - when I started gamemastering I just made my own rules based on old wargames - that worked fine - its the setting/mood/etc that is the important part anyway :)

Xyll
07-02-2010, 11:28 AM
Well you can do one of many things you can use the books you have and make do or. http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/ you could use this which is a revamped 1st edition, or you could use this http://www.d20srd.org/ which is 3.5 or you could use this http://paizo.com/pathfinderRPG/prd/ which is pathfinder basic rules. or you could spend some money on the actual books but if you are just getting in to it and restarting then one of those options may be a good choice. I prefer having the books over digital copies but whatever works in a pinch. hope it helps.

Juggernaut1981
07-11-2010, 11:51 PM
Pathfinder is nicknamed D&D3.75... it's a rebuild of some features of D&D3.5.

As far as prep goes, I kept everything on my laptop. I did have to run fairly linear, scripted and not too much free-roaming in sessions (mostly because of the convention-style of the meeting...)

For more free-flowing games, with a lot of "free-scope" for the players I tend to prepare a number of 'random encounters' of various levels (e.g. Orc Raid, Kobold Trapper Ambushes, Attack by animals X, Y & Z). Preplaned Villages (random name generators are EXCELLENT. I'd suggest you use the DonJon Name Generator http://donjon.bin.sh/name/) you include a local bailiff/mayor, an innkeeper, general store owner, a few commoners, maybe a trapper/skinner or a lumberjack or a miner. Having four or five of them pre-generated AT ALL TIMES is step #1. Step #2 is to remember to give it a location when you "give it a location"... e.g. if the PCs drop into the village outside the Cave of Alexandre... you better remember that is where the village is.

Extra stuff prepped is always your friend. If you want a more free-flowing mission, I'd suggest you should prepare a LOT of extra information (but you don't always use all of it). It changes how you plan missions, campaigns and the rest of it all. Basically you prepare clusters of useful information around a BBEG. Also, you still plan out the usual Tomb of DeadRichGuy and the Valley of AncientBattle and the Tower of the Wizard BigBoom....

For example:
Lord Killey (the BBEG) is the Lord of County BLAH. He owns Castle BLAH, has a personal armed guard of 10 Guards, 2 Sergeants and 1 Lieutenant. He has a spy network throughout the County of approximately 5 proper spies, 1 assassin and a large number of information sources from across society. His standing army consists of 30 swordsman, 30 archers, 10 cavalry, 1 engineer, and for every 5 common soldiers, there is a Sergeant, for every 10 soldiers there is 1 Lieutenant commanding 2 Sergeants each. There is a Captain of the Guard who oversees all soldiers except for Killey's personal guard. He also has a number of local criminals he bribes to undertake tasks for him, but also finds it reduces general crime.

Then you have to identify what Lord Killey would use each of the various options at his disposal. It's a bit of extra setup but then you can completely wing-it from that point onwards.
e.g. Players cause problems, get them arrested by the guard
or have some of his "goons" mug the PCs
or have them quietly killed in a tavern by the assassin....

arsheesh
07-12-2010, 12:20 AM
Organizing Combat

Hm, some really great ideas here! I think I'll join the fun. Regarding organization during combat encounters, I created my own "Battle Chart" in Word (though if you have access to Excel, even better). In this battle chart, I drew up tables for the party and all of the baddies that listed initiative order, and some quick info on the combat stats of the party and the monsters (see the attachment below). Whenever combat begins, I record the initiative order on the chart. Likewise, whenever HP are lost, or other combat modifiers are applied, these can quickly be recorded in the table. This has helped me immensely in speeding up combat.

Organizing Your Campaign

On another note, if your are not already familiar with the Obsidian Portal (http://www.obsidianportal.com/), you should do yourself a favor and check it out. Basically it's a web hosting site that allows you to create and maintain your own wiki based site. I can't tell you how helpful a resource this has been for me and my players. You can keep virtually all of your campaign and world info all in one centralized location that is accessible to all of your players. You can even create DM only pages, or append DM only sections to public pages for you to create your own notes. They also have a feature that allows you to upload your maps, though sadly, the resolution is quite limited. If you want to get a sense of what can be done with this site, I'd invite you to check out my Age of Legends (http://www.obsidianportal.com/campaign/age-of-legends) campaign (it was last month's Featured Campaign of the month).

Cheers,
-Arsheesh

Wolf63
09-09-2010, 06:19 AM
What I'm interested in is organization. Say for instance.. encounters, treasure, and events. I was thinking of making notecards with encounters/groups written on them so that when an encounter happens I can pull from my pre-made list of critters instead of thumbing through the monster manual to find something.. or coming up with something on the fly.

Does this sound like the way to go? I really want to be on top of things, because in many.. MANY games that I have played, there were long delays and pauses for the DM to 'figure things out'. If I get a new player interested.. I don't want them to fall asleep of boredom haha.

So basically I was thinking of doing the same thing for treasures, and events too. Treasures aren't that big a deal.. I can come up with that easily on the fly. It'd be nice I suppose to have some pre-gen stuff though just to be prepared. Also traps - it would be nice to mark my map with a symbol to denote a trap and just be able to pull a trap card from my notecards instead of devising something on the spot.


I've been playing RPGs since the mid 80s and been a GM since almost as long and my mantra has always been INDEX CARDS ARE YOUR FRIENDS. I hold them as a priority tool right below the game books and the character sheet.

The NPC Cards.
I glue or tape two or more index cards either back to back or accordian style. On one side, I write the NPC's name down and game stats. On the other card, I write the NPC's description in SSNPC format.

1; Occupation and History
2; Physical Description
3; Distinguishing Features
4; Attributes and Skills
5; Values and Motives
6, Interaction With Others
7; Useful Knowledge

I have literally thousands of these cards filled out, which I've been doing since the early 90s, for several different games

PC Experience and Treasure Card
I use a card for each PC and everytime experience is gained, I make a scratch mark which is worth 25 points. When a pc claims a magic item, DONT TELL HIM WHAT IT IS, write it down on the bottom of the card

I also use cards for magic items, locations and encounters

Wolf63
09-09-2010, 06:49 AM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I do have another slight issue though.
I am without a DM's guide or screen.. which isn't really that big a deal I suppose, but to make the game run smoother it would surely help.
Haha, it's funny because the books I do have - don't match. I have a 3e monster manual and a 2e players handbook. Meh, go figure. I haven't played enough 3e to be comfortable enough to DM a 3e game.

Long story short, along the way all the other books I acquired have been stolen or lost.

Anyway, I'm not sure if it's an issue, but if someone knows of a place where I can get a printable DM screen for 2e that would be great. I don't even care if it's some home-brew thing. Otherwise it's time to hit up ebay for some books :D


GM Screen
I've made my own by grabbing 6 clip boards and assembling them with three of the clips face you, for your notes and charts, and three clips face the players for the player maps or pictures

As for combining D&D 2nd and 3rd material, DON'T. In my opinion, running D&D 3rd is a lot easier then running 2nd and the rules are essentually free if you grab the SRD. And another bonus to D&D 3rd is that it uses the D20 core mechanics which is used for other franchises.

For example, I'm running a Stargate X campaign which fuses Stargate, Babylon 5, Star Wars and Starship Troopers. I've been running this campaign for almost 6 years and it's still going strong.

I also run a Mystic West campaign involving gunfighters, martial arts, and a heavy dose of magic

Did I have to come up with any rules? No. They're all available as d20 rules, which is the same rules D&D 3rd uses. One ruleset, many games

Midgardsormr
09-09-2010, 10:31 PM
On the topic of GM's screens, I picked up a used restaurant menu holder a while back for that purpose. If you happen to know anyone who's a waiter or otherwise involved with a reasonably nice restaurant, you might ask if they can get you one.

I haven't used mine in quite a while. Having the computer handy renders it unnecessary, particularly since I prefer to make my die rolls in the open.

Aval Penworth
09-10-2010, 10:47 AM
particularly since I prefer to make my die rolls in the open.

Whaaaaaat? Why would you do that? Experienced players can work out the opponents stats in a few rounds with open rolls.


@wolf63 I think NPC cards/ sheets are very valuable. You need to have a lot of prepared NPCs. Excellent advice.

Plus Juggers really knows what he is taliking about. Sage advice.

mearrin69
09-10-2010, 11:19 AM
I tried the NPC/enemy index card thing and found it cumbersome (and I don't like to write and don't want to try to set them up to print) BUT one thing I really like doing is putting items found (at least magical/unique ones) on small cards with a "serial number" and hand them out as appropriate. When the PCs identify the item they can take notes on it. It's an easy way for me to keep track of stuff and the players seem to like getting something to hold on to when they find something. Plus, if they lose the card they lose the item...so it's easier on me since I don't have to look back and try to figure what they got off of Drow #43. I just have to keep a list noting the stats of the item on card #x. Paizo's item cards are cool but I don't want to write on them so they're kind of limiting for me (and I don't want to buy 100 packs).

I also make color NPC cards with non-metagame information on them so I can hand them out to players for reference.

BTW, I make (most of) my rolls in the open too. Yeah, the players figure out enemy stats but, believe me, they'll do it anyway. I'm pretty strict on metagaming during interactions and such but I allow some during combat.
M

Midgardsormr
09-10-2010, 11:55 AM
Whaaaaaat? Why would you do that? Experienced players can work out the opponents stats in a few rounds with open rolls.


Because it eliminates my temptation to fudge rolls to save the party.
Because my players don't really metagame all that much.
Because I keep things moving quickly enough that they don't have time to do a whole lot of calculations before their turns come 'round again.
Because even if they do figure out the enemy's stats, that's not all that unrealistic. Most experienced fighters can manage to gauge an opponent's skills after fighting them for a short time.
And because it doesn't spoil anything if they do figure it out.

NeonKnight
09-10-2010, 06:20 PM
I too roll my dice in the open. I find it makes the game 'tense' and the players LOVE IT when the dice god turns against them :D

Aval Penworth
09-10-2010, 07:11 PM
@midgardsormr.. Well if your players are able to avoid metagaming, okay. I have a couple of players who would completely change their tactics depending on how many damage dice I rolled.

I do agree that some open rolls add to the excitement of the game, however.

I actually use an electronic database rather than actual cards...but I still think cards are a good idea. I also have sketches of key NPCs which I display while the characters are interacting with them.

mearrin69
09-14-2010, 09:12 AM
I tend to use a lot of images to immerse my players. I'm running a Call of Cthulhu game for my "Three DMs" gaming group and it's set in modern Portland so I'm loving Google's image search right now and things like Google maps and Yelp are really helping me add to the realism. Last night they met up with a priest at a doughnut shop (sounds like the beginning of a joke) and I was able to show them the site and pictures of their doughnuts from their menu. That's fun stuff. One of the PCs is an "online investigator" so she's always looking for stuff on the Internet...it's nice to be able to dig up actual web pages to show during play. Of course, you can't believe everything you read on the Internet, can you? Everybody knows that Snopes is operated by the Men in Black to hide the activities of the Old Ones from the unsuspecting populace...
M

BTW: Right now there's a pretty deep-rooted cult devoted to Hastur that's trying to offer up Portland as a sacrifice, culminating in the shifting of the entire city to Carcosa once they manage to get The King in Yellow performed. Right now they're sacrificing people around the city, outlining a pentagram as seen from above, and engaged in an insidious campaign to slip the Yellow Sign and other K.I.Y. items into the popular culture. Here's their patsy band's flyer (kludged together in Photoshop from stuff found on Google Images - bah...have to post it in a bit as it's not on my laptop as I had thought).

mearrin69
09-14-2010, 01:20 PM
Ah. Here it is.
M

Steel General
09-14-2010, 03:43 PM
The band looks like Marty Casey & the Lovehammers

mearrin69
09-14-2010, 04:12 PM
That sounds familiar. I just pulled a band photo off of the Internet and combined it with some other stuff. In my world they're Nathaniel (Nate), Leander, Scott, and Lawrence (Larry).
M

Jaxilon
09-19-2010, 10:25 PM
That is totally Marty Casey and the Lovehammers. I like that guy. :)