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View Full Version : Alien life - Finally



ravells
03-07-2011, 02:08 PM
It looks like we may have discovered alien life.

Link here (http://news.yahoo.com/s/digitaltrend...nceofalienlife)

moutarde
03-07-2011, 02:30 PM
404'd for me, but I think this is the same article you were referring to Ravs:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/digitaltrends/20110305/tc_digitaltrends/nasascientistfindsevidenceofalienlife

ravells
03-07-2011, 02:32 PM
Yeah that's the one...I must have pasted the wrong link or not all of it or something. Thanks moutarde!

Ascension
03-07-2011, 06:16 PM
Does it have a mothership? :)

LS-Jebus
03-07-2011, 07:54 PM
According to some theories, meteors may be the motherships of planet-populating microorganisms. No one knows whether life started on earth, or came from meteors from a far away solar system, or both.

I was watching a documentary about the creation of Earth on the Discovery Channel last night, and I was disappointed that they didn't touch on how life started. It jumped from creating conditions needed to sustain life and the prescence of amino acids, to single celled organisms. The story between those points is extremely important. How did it go from simple amino acids to a self-replicating acid that is contained within the complex structure of a cell?

Anyway, I really want this finding to be true, because I want there to be other planets with life, but I'll have to wait on that.

rdanhenry
03-07-2011, 09:07 PM
This is likely another false alarm.

As to how life started, there is very little evidence available on the specifics. Before you get the first cells -- and single-celled organisms don't fossilize well -- you've got loose alliances of free-floating molecules. I've no idea how that could possibly fossilize in any identifiable form.

LonewandererD
03-09-2011, 09:19 PM
I've read this article before and I have to say that I'm a bit sceptical, mainly because I just don't see life growing in the cold void of space, my understanding of chemistry and biology is somewhat limited but what I know is that heat is the catalyst for most development and chemical reactions.

-D-

Gidde
03-10-2011, 10:07 AM
Growing in the vacuum and intense cold of space isn't likely, but if I remember correctly there was an experiment in NEO where they hung a container of bacteria on the outside of the spacecraft for a while then brought it back inside and it grew again. Microorganisms in stasis are quite plausible in an asteroid/comet.

Ascension
03-10-2011, 05:05 PM
Stasis is very possible. There are some fish and frogs that grow in mud puddles over in Africa and these mud puddles only appear like every dozen or so years. I saw that on one of those Nat Geo shows. If you watched Dirty Jobs last week you saw them do something like that with termites as well...all they need is water and they come back to life.