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View Full Version : Two New Worlds: Earth's Cousin and The Big Neighbor



jerriecan
04-07-2011, 08:14 PM
Hi. Been trying out sdome of the tutorials here to make more realistic planets - here's my latest attempts.

Earth's Cousin - My first try in a long time at making coastlines from scratch, and first ever at making city lights.

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The Big Neighbor - Very Endor-like, next to a Jupiter-style gas giant.

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Hope you like them!

Jerriecan

eViLe_eAgLe
04-07-2011, 09:09 PM
That's amazing..

Ryan K
04-07-2011, 09:26 PM
Just beautiful :) Excellent work!

bartmoss
04-07-2011, 10:55 PM
Very very beautiful. I only have one criticism, the lights of the cities ont he first one kind of look to me as if a starry background was shining through. I don't have any good sure-fire ways to fic this, but maybe push these lights a bit into the yellow, and make them of a less uniform size? On earth, some cities are much bigger than others, so the city lights sort of blot together in places instead of all being the same size.

jerriecan
04-08-2011, 12:01 AM
Thanks for the kind words!

Yeah, I know the lights didn't turn out very good. I need more practice and more patience. Hopefully I'll be posting more efforts soon. :) I appreciate the advice!

Jerriecan

cranerat
04-08-2011, 01:17 AM
If that's the results from the tutorials then I'm "SOLD".
Fantastik work!

Diamond
04-08-2011, 01:22 AM
Beautiful work. Color me impressed!

alaskanflyboy
04-08-2011, 12:20 PM
I like them. As for the lights, when I created a few of my planets, I had a layer I called "Atmosphere" that was a colored circle the same size as the planet. I seem to recall I used a multiply effect, but you'll have to play around with it. In any case, the layer gave a general atmospheric haze that would also tinge those lights a bit as if they're being diffused by the planet's atmosphere.

Hungry Donner
04-22-2011, 03:28 PM
I agree about the lights. If you look here (http://www.emich.edu/physics/sherzer/images/earthlts.jpg) you can see clusters, distinct coastlines, and even stripes along important rivers, rail lines, and roads. Generally on Earth people cluster around the coast and rivers so unless the society on your world is specifically more diffuse I think this would help bring out the night side of your planet.

wormspeaker
04-26-2011, 10:58 AM
Excellent work. As for the lights on the first planet, try to make them more "spidery" and you will have them look more "realistic." There's no particular reason that cities couldn't be circular on this other planet, but generally on Earth, as Hungry Donner stated, the population centers follow rivers, coastlines, and major transit routes.

RobA
04-28-2011, 04:33 PM
I agree about the lights. If you look here (http://www.emich.edu/physics/sherzer/images/earthlts.jpg) you can see clusters, distinct coastlines, and even stripes along important rivers, rail lines, and roads. Generally on Earth people cluster around the coast and rivers so unless the society on your world is specifically more diffuse I think this would help bring out the night side of your planet.

Not to be a killjoy, but AFAIK you can't actually see the lights from space the way this is depicted.

Article on how the image was made: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/Lights/

from page 2

The images were taken by a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). This network of satellites was originally designed to pick up on lunar illumination reflecting off of clouds at night in order to aid nighttime aircraft navigation. What the Air Force discovered is that on evenings when there was a new moon, the satellites were sensitive enough to record the illumination from city lights. Over a period of several new moons, the data the satellites retrieved could be pieced together to produce a global image of city lights.

So at best, take artistic license and just make it "look good".

-Rob A>

wormspeaker
04-29-2011, 12:01 PM
Not to be a killjoy

Killjoy. =)

rdanhenry
04-30-2011, 09:28 PM
The eye doesn't see things the same way the camera does, so you probably don't see the lights just like that (well, definitely not, since at least some would be obscured by weather patterns), but you can see them. People started taking pictures of the Earth's night lights because they could see them. The human eye is very sensitive to light.

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CitiesAtNight/ may be of interest.