PDA

View Full Version : Monks writing room - WIP



Tony.m.meijer
07-31-2011, 10:40 AM
Hello,
I have just started a small project, namely a floorplan for a writing room for a group of monks, that you can find here (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1419307/skrivrum.png).

Now, my problem is this, the writing pulpits looks like someone with photoshop have made them, while the rest of the image is a little bit more worn and rough. Does anyone have a suggestion on how to make scribbly lines?

Cheers.

Tony.m.meijer
07-31-2011, 01:46 PM
Hello,
I'm trying to develop a floor plan for a writing room and I'm having a spot of trouble, namely with the furniture, here (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1419307/skrivrum.png) is an image of the state I am in.

What I'm looking for is a tutorial or an example on how to draw furniture from a top-down perspective, does anyone have any suggestions?

Subcreator
07-31-2011, 03:14 PM
To me, it just seems that the pulpits were made with a ruler, which would make sense for a floor plan. My question is how big is the monastery? It would seem that a scriptorium would be larger if there are more monks present, or is this more of a private scriptorium for monks of a higher order?

Grits
07-31-2011, 04:30 PM
What a fun project. I really enjoy drawing floor plans.

The best way to see what people that do drafting for a living use would be to do a search for the 3 words: drafting furniture blocks. This will bring up some that are free downloadable blocks in CAD format, which you may not be able to use, depending on what file formats you have access to. But, there are some images of the top view on some of the pages I just looked at, which would help you get an idea of what other people use.

That said, there is no rule that I know of that furniture has to look an exact certain way, but of course you want it recognizable as a sofa, chair, etc.

I also tried using the word template to search, and it brings up some useful information, but the majority was for the plastic templates you could buy to draw outlines of furniture on paper. Which I don't believe would be any help to you.

When I make floor plans, and I already have the piece of furniture, I try & make it the real world size, and what the piece of furniture would really look like if looked down upon.

When it comes to showing that a drawer exists in a desk, or the way a door swings, there are basic "rules" that are followed. Not sure that you would be going into that much detail though.

Most importantly, **Check the creator's/owner's permissions for anything you download or copy to make sure that your type of use is permitted.**

Good luck to you. It looks great so far.

ravells
07-31-2011, 07:42 PM
To make scribbly lines, try playing with the scatter jitter settings in Photoshop.

P.S. Hope you don't mind, I merged the other thread you started with this one as they seem to concern questions about the same map.

About drawing the top down furniture, do you have an example of what you want it to look like? Are you looking for something which is forced perspective or just a plain top down view?

Tony.m.meijer
08-01-2011, 03:33 AM
To me, it just seems that the pulpits were made with a ruler, which would make sense for a floor plan. My question is how big is the monastery? It would seem that a scriptorium would be larger if there are more monks present, or is this more of a private scriptorium for monks of a higher order?

In all honesty the map is a test made for a couple of friends who is into rpg-writing and where curious on how much of a room description they could push into a map instead. At the moment there are three more things that I plan on including in the map, that is monks with a small moon/sun next to them (to show when they are in the room), some more furniture to show what kind of a room it is (book-press, stuff like that) and a legend.

So, to answer your question regarding the size of the monastery, I have no idea ;), I got a description of the scriptorium and thats it.

Tony.m.meijer
08-01-2011, 03:39 AM
The best way to see what people that do drafting for a living use would be to do a search for the 3 words: drafting furniture blocks. This will bring up some that are free downloadable blocks in CAD format, which you may not be able to use, depending on what file formats you have access to. But, there are some images of the top view on some of the pages I just looked at, which would help you get an idea of what other people use.

I have no problem using CAD drawings, my job is basically the development similar applications. The problem with those drawings are that they do not really conform to the aged look I'm trying to get. I want it to look like its an old map basically and the super straight lines does not really help me unfortunately :(



When it comes to showing that a drawer exists in a desk, or the way a door swings, there are basic "rules" that are followed. Not sure that you would be going into that much detail though.

Pleas do, give me a couple of pointers, I'm not against using common techniques as long as I can make them look old ;)



Good luck to you. It looks great so far.

Thank you and thank you for the massive post, brilliant ;)

Tony.m.meijer
08-01-2011, 03:48 AM
To make scribbly lines, try playing with the scatter jitter settings in Photoshop.

Thanks, I will try that ;)


P.S. Hope you don't mind, I merged the other thread you started with this one as they seem to concern questions about the same map.

Certainly not, It was a mistake on my part that I realized a bit to late yesterday (I missed the new thread or did not reload the page so I thought it was lost and when I saw that there where two threads they had already been separately answered).


About drawing the top down furniture, do you have an example of what you want it to look like? Are you looking for something which is forced perspective or just a plain top down view?

Specifically I'm looking for something that have three requirements in descending order of importance (the first is most important), the first is that it should be as intuitive as possible what the furniture is, the second is that it should be correct size wise and lastly it should not clash stylistically with what I have got.

In my mind a plain top-down view would follow that and I'm open to suggestions on the contrary ;)

ravells
08-01-2011, 04:22 AM
Have you tried the Dunjinni forums? They have a lot of top down symbols there. Might give you some ideas.

Tony.m.meijer
08-01-2011, 09:36 AM
Have you tried the Dunjinni forums? They have a lot of top down symbols there. Might give you some ideas.

That seems to have hit the spot, I found a couple of good tables that I think highlights the problem. There is basically nothing wrong with the design of the thing, but rather that it looks too clean. I will try to make a thing thats a bit more worn on the way home.

If that does not work then I downloaded this (http://dspace.mit.edu/bitstream/handle/1721.1/33024/1/62083896.pdf) article that discusses architectural drawings from the middle ages, and I shall see if I can do something from that. I'l try to post something this evening...

Tony.m.meijer
08-01-2011, 01:33 PM
Here (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1419307/skrivrum4.png) is a couple of variations, but they do not seem to turn out very well unfortunately...

Tony.m.meijer
08-03-2011, 01:13 PM
Here (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1419307/skrivrum6.png) is the latest update, it turned out quiet nice, although I will have to add a little bit o randomness to the stuff on the tables. I will need some more stuff as well, two bookcases and a table and a bookpress but after that we are done.

ravells
08-03-2011, 01:18 PM
That looks great! As you say, a bit of randomness for the stuff on the tables and I think you're there!

Subcreator
08-03-2011, 01:21 PM
Great work! As for getting a hand-drawn appearance, what I did with my city map is I separated the lines onto a different layer and used Oilify in GIMP. I'm not sure what the similar tool in Photoshop would be, though.

Tony.m.meijer
08-04-2011, 04:59 AM
That looks great! As you say, a bit of randomness for the stuff on the tables and I think you're there!

Thanks, I will push out some more furniture on it and post it, we shall se how it ends. It would be interesting to hear from you on how you think I could go about taking the map to the proverbial next level so to speak... Scale is one obvious route (more than one room would be a good start I assume ;). Any other?

Regards,
Tony Meijer.

Tony.m.meijer
08-04-2011, 05:03 AM
Great work! As for getting a hand-drawn appearance, what I did with my city map is I separated the lines onto a different layer and used Oilify in GIMP. I'm not sure what the similar tool in Photoshop would be, though.

Hmm, does it work well quality wise? Is it easy to put warps along crumbled parts in the paper?