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Surveyor
08-15-2011, 11:39 PM
Last year I made a touring map of Auralia. I found an 19th century map of an area which is very similar to that corner of Auralia.
I now wish to use my modern Auralia map to faithfully reconstruct a map of the same area as it might have looked in 1886.
The inset map is of Australia , South Western Victoria. In fact I live in the lower right hand corner.
The map got my interest because so much has changed in over a hundred years. A lot of places are no longer there, names have changed and most of the railways have gone.
The different coloured sections are old shires, some of which no longer exist or have merged with other shires.

Australian map --------------Last Years Auralia Map ------ My work in progress

37829 37830 37831

I welcome any help and criticism.

Cheers Surveyor

Coyotemax
08-16-2011, 04:30 AM
a bit early for constructive criticism as yet, but i like what you're trying to do.

Surveyor
08-20-2011, 07:54 AM
I have done some more research and it now seems that halftone mapping techniques would be very unlikely to have been used as early as 1886.
Yet the moire pattern from the supposedly original map very much suggested this to be the case, so I suspect that my old map may be a later halftone reprint of the original map. I spent many hours trying to emulate the halftone colours with a combination of the newsprint filter and various overlayed colours. (I am using Gimp). I found this a very difficult task. I tried also in PS but found the halftone filter there to be very limited. Enlarging the inset shows the simulated halftone attempt.
Here is a progress report for your criticism and comment.
37917

ravells
08-20-2011, 08:07 AM
Not sure if this will help, but there is a second way of getting a halftone effect in PS. If you turn the drawing into a bitmap (image/mode/bitmap), you may have to go grayscale first to get the bitmap option to become active, it opens up more halftone choices (but obviously in pure black and white only), but you can make the b/w halftone image a new layer over your colour one and use a multiply blend and play with the opacity.

Surveyor
08-20-2011, 09:01 AM
Not sure if this will help, but there is a second way of getting a halftone effect in PS. If you turn the drawing into a bitmap (image/mode/bitmap), you may have to go grayscale first to get the bitmap option to become active, it opens up more halftone choices (but obviously in pure black and white only), but you can make the b/w halftone image a new layer over your colour one and use a multiply blend and play with the opacity.
Thank You , I wish I had known about your method. I will definitely give that a try later. I think I am too far into this to start again. I find that the help files for Ps very complicated and confusing.
Cheers Surveyor

Surveyor
08-22-2011, 12:01 PM
Ravells, I played with both Ps and Gimp and I came up with this. Still done with Gimp. starting to put in detail.
37973

ravells
08-23-2011, 09:20 AM
That looks pretty good! It's hard to tell what sort of half tone process was used on the original map because of the resolution, but on my monitor anyway you've got very close.

Surveyor
08-31-2011, 02:17 AM
Ok , I think I have done as much as I can. I am reasonably pleased with what I tried to achieve, but I feel that I failed to make it an interesting map.
In the end it was a blend of Gimp and Ps . It is great that Gimp can save and read PSD files. This enabled me to make and use Hose brushes in Gimp utilise Ps.'s use of layer groups and other stuff.

38173

Coyotemax
08-31-2011, 03:02 AM
yow, that looks it was scanned from one of the atlases I used back in grade school ;)

Ascension
08-31-2011, 03:32 AM
Yeah, kudos for authenticity.

cantab
08-31-2011, 04:12 AM
I can't fault anything about this map.

Surveyor
08-31-2011, 11:47 AM
Coyotemax
yow, that looks it was scanned from one of the atlases I used back in grade school
That was my intention and I also remember those atlases used in school in the late 50's and early 60's.
Ascension and Cantab thank you for your comments!
It was a nice project and I have learned a lot.

zbeeblebrox
08-31-2011, 05:01 PM
That's really convincing. How did you simulate the aged print? It looks like all the locations were placed on the page with an old press.

Coyotemax
09-01-2011, 06:07 AM
My first thought had been that the text looked a little more blurry than I would expect, but then I thought back and I think it's actually pretty close, especially if it was cheap ink that was used (mass produced school atlases for the win!). What really sold it for me was 2 things - the fonts themselves, those are TOTALLY authentic looking, and the way there's so much stuff crammed onto the page, everything overlapping each other. that more than anything prompted the atlas comment.

I know I commented already but I couldn't help saying something again, I found myself thinking about this map at the oddest times today while I was at work. It left a surprising impression on me..

tilt
09-01-2011, 10:29 AM
nice going... a little to blurry in my opinion but cool project :)

Surveyor
09-01-2011, 10:55 AM
Coyotemax The font I used was Century Schoolbook, this font I found was used in other stuff of that era and it is characterised by the deep curly tongue on the Capital R slope. You are right about the fuzziness of the font. I deliberately put a small blur on all the fonts to emulate the lousy printing that was done in those cheap atlases and maps of that era.
I tried to put in more info ( marsh and terrain ) but it just became a blurry mess, so I left it out. The printing process of those days was obviously done with separate plates as the mis-registration is often quite evident.

jbgibson
09-04-2011, 05:54 PM
"failed to make it an interesting map"... false.
"failed to properly describe map as fascinating" .... truth :-)

I like it.

gilgamec
09-04-2011, 08:55 PM
Hmm.... I already commented here, but it seems the site swallowed my post. So:

It looks great!
I find that the fonts on old maps aren't so much fuzzy as inconsistent. I think it's because the ink used to print them blobs up, so two strokes which should be the same are wildly different. Look at the northwest corner of the original map: the ascenders in the E in Edenhope and the H in Harrow should be the same width, but the former is at least twice as thick as the latter. The horizontal line in the first e in "Tea Tree L." is completely missing!
But it still looks great!
That said, the fuzziness might work in your map if it wasn't so inconsistent itself. Look, for instance, at "Warrabool" versus "Warrabool Bay"; the former is much darker than the latter! This is the biggest problem I have with your map: on old maps, the black text is in the same color of ink, so you don't get one bit of text less dark than another.
It looks great! How did you do the shading in the ocean? On my own attempt to create a map of about the same era (here (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?9711-Procedural-mapping-style-experiments&p=105962&viewfull=1#post105962)), that was my biggest problem.

I think that was everything. (Phew!)

RevGunn
09-07-2011, 12:42 AM
This is an awesome map! I'm doing something similar, I just went a different way. As far as halftones, yes, I've seen North American maps form as early as 1850 with halftones on them in my research. Really hard to read on a monitor sometimes. I like it.