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Jaxilon
08-20-2011, 05:04 PM
Anyone know if there is any issues with laying an LCD monitor flat on it's back...so long as you don't block up the vents of course?

I've recently been given an HP w2408h HDMI and was thinking about using it for a VTT next time I have friends over. I would put a sheet of glass over the face of it so as not to destroy the surface of the screen as well.

I can always try it....was free after all :)

reklaw
08-20-2011, 05:36 PM
I couldn't find anything on Google regarding it being bad. As long as you protect it with a sheet of glass or something similar you should be fine. I remember seeing monitors laid flat inside of those desks you look down on but IIRC they were CRTs.

Jaxilon
08-20-2011, 06:05 PM
I'm such a dough-head: Upon messing with it I realize that the stand it comes on actually allows you to maneuver it so that it is facing straight up....all I need now is the clear sheet to protect it and I'm cooking with gas!!! Woot!

jfrazierjr
08-20-2011, 06:20 PM
DON"T put anything covering the glass directly!!!! you need some buffer space and preferably with some airflow to help redistribute the heat.. remember... heat rises... so the top is going to get hot...

Jaxilon
08-20-2011, 07:20 PM
Hmm...well there is a gap between the actual LCD and the "frame" it sits in. In other words, if I placed a piece of plexi glass on top it would leave about 1/8 inch but I don't think there would be much air flow since the case or frame is pretty flat as well.

I'm sure some heat escapes through the face of a monitor but doesn't most of it go out the sides and back where all the vent slots are?

jfrazierjr
08-20-2011, 07:33 PM
Yea.. but where does that heat go when the heat when the back is down???? seriously... several people have done this over on the MapTool forum, so trust me on this.... of course, it may also be the difference between a larger LCD TV monitor vs a smaller plain computer monitor.... but typically, people have put a spacer of about 1/2 inch or so to keep the plexi above as well as some fans to move the air around(like say.. computer cooling fans)

Jaxilon
08-20-2011, 08:38 PM
ok...or maybe I'll just drop the minis altogether. I'm thinking 1/2 inch hovering above the actual map surface might look funky unless you are standing directly over the top.

On a side note, I just had a fun time with a "DVI - Out of range" message trying to set up dual monitors for the first time....Yay. I'm going to have to go find out how to do this right.

tilt
08-21-2011, 09:31 AM
sounds like a cool project - show some pics of the setup when you're done :)

Ascension
08-21-2011, 10:07 AM
The glass you get is important in case it breaks. There are 3 kinds: 1-annealed (regular old plate glass that breaks up into big chunks), 2- tempered (breaks up into millions of little chunks), 3- laminated (actually 2 pieces with a layer of double-back clear tape between so when it breaks the chunks stick to the tape like in car windshields). The next thing to consider is weight so if the size if pretty big then you might want to go with thinner glass like 1/16" or 1/8". If weight doesn't matter then 3/16" or 1/4" is fine and 1/4" is the thinnest size for laminate. I'd use some 1" posts (chunk of wood, folded papers, etc) to raise the glass off the surface or frame of the monitor. The price for 1/16" to 3/16" annealed is about 5 bucks per square foot depending on where you live, the 1/4" is about 10 bucks. Tempered or laminated doubles the price and tempered has to be ordered, the others can be cut and edges sanded while you wait in 5 minutes if they have it in stock.

Master TMO
08-21-2011, 10:56 AM
Lay the plexi directly on the LCD frame, but make sure to cut or drill some vent holes in it first. Never tried anythiing like this myself, but if the issue is that heat would get trapped under there, it seems like a logical fix to me. A few holes scattered regularly across it shouldn't interfere with minis and gameplay, but would still allow heat to escape. You'd want several holes so that it would be less likely to have each of them covered by a wrong configuration of pieces blocking all of them.

Jaxilon
08-21-2011, 11:15 AM
@Ascension - Wouldn't plexiglass be a better application here? It's lighter and so on, yes? I'm also not too worried about breakage since of all the folks who I play with I'm the most spastic :) LOL (You know the one most likely to bring my fist down on the table and startle everyone).

If I get this to work I will take a picture.

TMO - that sounds like a good idea, putting some holes to allow heat to escape.

Ascension
08-21-2011, 01:20 PM
The problem with plexiglass is that it turns yellow in time, how fast I never really tested but I know within a couple of years. But, yeah, safer than annealed or tempered glass but not sure about the price; I'm guessing 2 bucks per foot.

Redrobes
08-21-2011, 04:54 PM
You can usually buy plexiglass in up to 8x4 ft sheets. Theres two kinds - acrylic / perpsex or the other type is polycarbonate. The latter is tougher and more scratch resistant but for what you are doing I would say either would be ok. Personally I think glass is not such a good idea. To get the weight down you would have to use thin glass which is kinda fragile. You can get sheets of acrylic as part of some cheap picture frames tho I guess they are less cheap when you need one huge... But those usually use somewhere between 1 and 2mm sheet plastic. It might not be stiff enough to hold its form over a wide horizontal surface edge tho. I would think 3mm would tho.

Stuff like this:
http://www.framedestination.com/Picture_Frame_Acrylic.html

I think the heat might be an issue and I guess it depends on the monitor design. If it looks like it would get too hot then I think drilling a line of holes down one edge and mounting a fan on the other side would allow air to flow through the gap and out.

Should get a quick plug in here that my VTT has a table top monitor / projector mode option so that you lose the border for full screen display. I know Battlegrounds RPG has that too. Not sure about the others. With mine you can set the screen width and height in real mm and then it maintains its real world scaling as well.

jbgibson
08-25-2011, 05:41 PM
Random vent holes .... you might have to assign a die roll to "Timmy does / does not fall down the well" ...