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Klaus van der Kroft
02-28-2012, 01:16 AM
(I'm not sure if I should keep all my related maps in the same topic or use different ones when they are parallel works. If I should join them up, just give me a heads-up and I'll delete the topic, merge them together and spend some good minutes thinking about what I've done!)

Hello again!

Some weeks ago, I made a map for a new setting I'm working on (directly related with this one: http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?17775-WIP-World-of-Flammarion-The-Holy-Empire). Initially it was supposed to be a quick thing intended for a roleplaying campaign I'm currently running, but as ideas started to pile up, I started thinking about making a more detailed version.

So today I had some spare hours and pressed the "Image Size: 500%" button and started working on it.

It is still on a very early stage, and I have to admit I'm really new at making properly detailed maps on Photoshop, so any advise or criticism is more than welcomed.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2nqb56s.jpg (http://www.wupload.com/file/2668378427/Flammarion_-_Known_World_-_WIP.jpg)

(click on the image to download the full map. 5mb)

So far I got the landmasses and some labbels for islands and some important water bodies. The plan is to use an abstract symbology for the features (such as drawing the mountains and key landmarks rather than using a more realistic look), although I'm not sure what would a proper balance be to avoid the map becoming too overloaded/hard to read. Should I draw only the larger features (mountains, hills, forests, etc) and leave stuff such as towns as symbols (dots, stars, etc), or would it be proper to draw some important towns as miniature icons (tiny castles and such) while leaving less important ones as tiny dots? I'm torn between trying to do a very detailed map in terms of information (with every single location labbeled and marked) and testing my hand at doing something more artistic.

What's your opinion?

Thanks beforehand for taking your time to check the map!

Latest Updated Version:

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Eilathen
02-28-2012, 07:11 AM
I like your continent shape a lot. And i for one am more for "towns as symbols" but i definitely want to see where the mountains, forests and rivers go etc. . Be that as it may, i am very much looking forward to what you will come up with.

miinstrel
02-28-2012, 12:19 PM
The continent does look nice. I think it depends on how many forests, mountains, etc there are in this region. If those are only going to cover 50% of the map then sure, go ahead and hand draw all the towns. Personally I would probably draw at least the larger cities as castles or something else to denote their prominence.

cereth
02-28-2012, 12:35 PM
Those are some nice landmasses you have there. (Hey, that would make a good pickup line ;) )

Seriously though, I like the colors and the shape of the continent so far.

Klaus van der Kroft
03-02-2012, 05:46 PM
Thanks for all the kind words. Much appreciated!

I just finished a climate overlay, intended to assist in the future drawing (since a lot of the world is yet to be developed!). I'm not very knowledgeable in weather patterns and such, so any help on improving it is more than welcomed.

The reason the climates run from left to right rather than up and down is because the world is flat and the sun is a burning disk being hauled by flaming titans. It used to traverse the sky across the diametre of the world, but after an ancient civilization attempted to catch it and accidentally dropped one of the titans onto the ground, the sun changed its course and now runs sort of tangentially across the right side of the map. Hope it ended up reasonably adapted!

You can click on the map to download the full-size version.

http://i44.tinypic.com/1zqd2td.jpg (http://www.wupload.com/file/2669997627/Flammarion_-_Climas.jpg)



Those are some nice landmasses you have there. (Hey, that would make a good pickup line ;) )

Let's get some subduction going on your tectonic plates, honk honk! <Gets thoroughly slapped>

Veldehar
03-08-2012, 11:13 PM
Nothing like a little tectonic innuendo to drag a conversation into the gutter!

Love the shape detail of the landmass and look forward to the future on this project. I torment myself with climate so I'm of little help in this case, LOL.

Klaus van der Kroft
03-09-2012, 08:45 AM
Thank you very much, Veldehar.

Please accept my apologies for the slow updates. It has been a crazy time at work (although of the good kind of crazy), and not having a fixed work schedule means *all* my hours are work schedule.

I'll hopefully get some progress done this weekend!

Lukc
03-09-2012, 03:28 PM
It looks good, and shaping up well. I'd just mention that I don't think the capital K's on your font are very well kerned and would benefit from some manual manipulation. Cough cough.

Klaus van der Kroft
03-09-2012, 05:41 PM
It looks good, and shaping up well. I'd just mention that I don't think the capital K's on your font are very well kerned and would benefit from some manual manipulation. Cough cough.

I am but a man, and such understanding escapes me!

How do I fix that? (the font is not of my authoring by the way. The name is Blackadder ITC).

Lukc
03-09-2012, 06:43 PM
Well ... fixing the font is hard. Fortunately fixing the individual instances is a bit easier. The problem is with the font itself. "kerning" is basically the spacing of the individual glyphs and the capital "K" glyph has a long, descending right leg, which leaves an empty looking space between it and the next glyph. It would look far better if it was tucked closer to the next letter.

For example, it looks like it says K_arganat and K_inshar.

Unfortunately, aside from fiddling with the letter spacing settings in photoshop or gimp for the individual K glyphs, it's probably a waste of time worrying about it just for a map :)

Lalaithion
03-11-2012, 03:12 PM
First: what I am about to say is a generalization and there are exceptions. but generally...

Generally, mountains affect climate. Clouds and rain are carried by winds that tend to blow in the same patterns. When clouds hit mountains, they dump their rain, causing lush forests. But on the other half of the ridge, there is no rain and a desert is created. a wonderful example of this is Northern California vs Nevada. As you go over those mountains you go from forests, strawberry farms, and wineries to slat flats and cacti.

Certain general worldwide patters (caused by the earths rotation) are shown on this map:
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Exceptions are common, for example this is how winds generally are:
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Now, because your world is flat, your winds can follow any pattern you want, or they can just blow randomly, but if they blow randomly, then the entire planet should have more or less the same rainfall. My suggestion would be to make a wind direction chart and mountain ranges that fit with the climates you already have.

These rainfall areas will affect multitudes of other things as well. Winds coming off deserts will be warm; one of the reasons for the warmth of europe is the wind from the sahara.

Here, for reference, is a map of Europe's Topography:
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And here, a map of the Rainfall, with a strong correlation between changes in altitude and a massive dumping of rain.
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Once again, there are exceptions, but just think about this before placing major mountain ranges.

silverhead
03-12-2012, 04:21 PM
The reason the climates run from left to right rather than up and down is because the world is flat and the sun is a burning disk being hauled by flaming titans. It used to traverse the sky across the diametre of the world, but after an ancient civilization attempted to catch it and accidentally dropped one of the titans onto the ground, the sun changed its course and now runs sort of tangentially across the right side of the map. Hope it ended up reasonably adapted!


Whoa. A flat world ... a burning disk ... flaming titans ... That's a quirky setting you're working at :-)

First of all: I'm not a climate expert, just had to deal with the same issues than everyone when making maps. So take everything I say with a grain of salt. You've been warned :-)

I'd start placing mountains before climate. Whatever the wind patterns, mountains are very important in defining the climate of a region, and you should start there. Of course, maybe you already have a few ideas of what climates you want; and if so, you should just put the mountains in the places that would favor those climates.

A tricky thing will be winds. Winds on earth are caused by difference of pressure and the coriolis effect, which has no meaning in your world because it doesn't rotate. Random winds are not, in my humble opinion, very cool. So I'd just go for some pattern, any pattern, using whatever motive fits into your world.

Having winds and mountains, climate will follow.

Klaus van der Kroft
03-12-2012, 05:00 PM
Thanks a lot for the excellent input, guys. Much appreciated!

Regarding mountains and climates: Aye, I'm trying to aim toward something along those lines, where mountains act like humidity walls creating strikingly different weathers on both sides. After all, I come from a country which is nothing but 5.000 kilometres of mountain, and we have a very marked effect on those lines (ie, southern Chile is a cold, lush, rainy region of green forests, while the exact same latitude on the Argentinian side is an endless field of dry steppes).

The winds, however, now that is something I need to work in further detail. Without boring you with the details, various things in Flammarion have to work through artificial means upkept by the Mundificial Church ever since God apparently abandoned the world, including the winds themselves, which are drawn through a majestic structure called the Gates of Zephyr and made to blow all across the world. These gates are located near the coast of the Ocean of Katergat (lower-left corner of the map), atop the mountains, and were built some centuries ago when the natural winds began to falter and caused widespread famine and distress due to the sudden climate change that followed.

So I was thinking that the winds would, thus, blow across the oceans and from there into the continental landmasses, carrying lots of water from their trip across the seas and concentrating humid zones across the coastal regions. Those areas where mountains rise beyond the coast are greener and enjoy increased rain activity, while the further inland you go the less humid it gets, with "returning winds" devoid of moisture turning vast tracks of land into deserts and steppes. As the winds circle back into the Gates of Zephyr, those currents that pass over the warm waters of the inner seas, they pick up moisture again and pour it as heavy rain in the inner lands of the Empire region before climing up the mountains again into the structure to be blow back into the oceans beyond (hence the humid zones in the lower-left area of the map).

Would that make any sense -considering the already impossible proportions of the world, of course- as a consistent climatic pattern?

mythus
03-15-2012, 12:30 PM
Had to up your rep after reading this post.

I am a huge fan of creating histories and mythologies when world creating, using them as a guide to create your world. You seemingly have done a good job with that! Very cleaver, very interesting, making me want to know more! It will likely serve as a great source of campaign material, so good job!

Lyandra
06-09-2012, 07:20 PM
This looks really good. I like your coastlines especially. I hope you will come back to mapping it real soon. ;)

Klaus van der Kroft
06-17-2012, 09:44 PM
Well, well, well! Seems I can't catch a break this year; work's getting pretty time consuming (no complaints, though. We're making real progress and it's getting real fun. I work in at olive-oil producer/exporter company I created with my dad). However, I'm finally with some extra time to dedicate to drawing. While I couldn't go strides ahead, I did manage to get some mountains going on, as well as adding some basic portolan lines. Here's what I got so far (I cropped the rest of the map, since I've only drawn mountains on this part). You can click on it for a bigger version:

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Since this is the first map I ever draw using a tablet, I'm kind of improvising most of the stuff as I go along, such as the way I drew the mountains. While I usually draw cleaner ones, this particular way has grown on me lately. It's like drawing hundreds of tiny moustaches! What do you guys think? Since I've never been really much of an artist, I tend to have difficulties in keeping my style consistent, so I'd rather ask your opinion.



Had to up your rep after reading this post.

I am a huge fan of creating histories and mythologies when world creating, using them as a guide to create your world. You seemingly have done a good job with that! Very cleaver, very interesting, making me want to know more! It will likely serve as a great source of campaign material, so good job!

Much appreciated! Flammarion is a setting I've always wanted to work with. The ideas have been tumbling around in my head for years, but time and again I kept shelving them, because they were mostly a disparrage bunch of concepts without a connecting line. So this particular campaign, and the cartographic drive caused by this forum, have made me to finally start turning it into something more solid. No idea if it is really original or even worthwhile to read, but I've really had a fun time working on it.


This looks really good. I like your coastlines especially. I hope you will come back to mapping it real soon. ;)

Why thank you very much!

jbgibson
06-18-2012, 12:18 PM
The mountains are delightful, and the coastlines do have a nice shape. There's a little disconnect between the two though, just in the look of the line. The mountains are so sharply lined that they make the thicker coast look a bit blurry.

Do please persevere, even if life puts gaps in your available time - what you have going is a good look, and yay! for putting thought into causes for climate effects.

vorropohaiah
06-18-2012, 12:59 PM
Love the landmass and the overall shape of the continent you made, as well as the colours. the mountains are nice though make me feel a bit dizzy, like theyre somewhat blurred... not sure if thats because the image has been resized?

great work

Klaus van der Kroft
06-18-2012, 06:20 PM
Thank you both very much.

I do agree: The coastline clashes with the mountains, and these in turn do look a bit blurry for some reason.

I'll try to fix those issues when I get home. I'm thinking less blurr on the coastline and perhaps a stroke on the mountain layer to make it clearer. I'll see what I can do.

Thanks for the sharp eye!

Klaus van der Kroft
06-18-2012, 11:40 PM
Alright, took your guys much-valued comments into consideration and I could no longer shake off the indeed-out-of-focus feel of many of the lines!

So I tried remaking the coastlines by using thiner strokes and threw in some Sharpen on the mountain layer, tryng to better match the focus on both.

What do you guys think? I want to find a proper level before moving onto the rest of the mountaineering.

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Lyandra
06-19-2012, 07:59 AM
This looks certainly better than the previous image, especially mountains. I'm not so sure about the coastline though, it looks too sharp to me now, I can see individual pixels and it irritates me. Sorry for not being satisfied, I'don't know, maybe it's just me, but if I were you I would soften the coastline a bit... Not much, just a little, to make the lines smoother. I think that the softness of the previous coastline was annoying mainly due to its thickness.

Good luck with the rest of mountaineering! Love the term btw. ;)

necrominog
06-19-2012, 10:19 AM
I like the style of the map. Not sure of your influence but it has the look of the venerable Old World map from Warhammer FRP. I'm currently looking at it in my iPad and the details looked blurred. I'll have to look back when I get in front of my desktop.

Nice start :)

Klaus van der Kroft
06-19-2012, 10:38 AM
This looks certainly better than the previous image, especially mountains. I'm not so sure about the coastline though, it looks too sharp to me now, I can see individual pixels and it irritates me. Sorry for not being satisfied, I'don't know, maybe it's just me, but if I were you I would soften the coastline a bit... Not much, just a little, to make the lines smoother. I think that the softness of the previous coastline was annoying mainly due to its thickness.

Good luck with the rest of mountaineering! Love the term btw. ;)

Hm, you are correct. I didn't notice the pixels last night, but they are quite clear today. I'll try with a slightly thicker stroke when I get back home. Thanks!


I like the style of the map. Not sure of your influence but it has the look of the venerable Old World map from Warhammer FRP. I'm currently looking at it in my iPad and the details looked blurred. I'll have to look back when I get in front of my desktop.

Nice start :)

Indeed! While I'm not exactly using the old WHF map as a base directly, that particular piece of work has been ingrained in my memory as one of my all-time favourites ever since I first saw it many years ago. Pretty much every map I have made since has had some kind of influence, particularly when it comes to the colours involved.

Scott Prevett
06-20-2012, 04:38 PM
I'll echo what the above posters said; the style of the map is very appealing. The layered glow around the continents, the subtle texture backgrounds on both sea and land, and the simplicity of uniform color are all great touches. I can't wait to see it when it's finished.

Klaus van der Kroft
06-26-2012, 12:49 AM
Got me some work done in that there 'ere. Figured I'd take the oportunity to add lakes and experiment with rivers too, as well as trying to find a better balance with the edges. Hope it be more pleasin' to the eye now!

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Speaking of cows, I'm on a pondersome ponderation: I really like the font I've been using so far (Blackadder), but I've noticed it doesn't read well for small names, and tends to look odd when distorted to fit in smaller spaces (such as tiny bays or around rivers). Do you guys know of a nice font that would fit the style and at the same time extend the eye-life of the viewer a few more years?

Thanks beforehand!




I'll echo what the above posters said; the style of the map is very appealing. The layered glow around the continents, the subtle texture backgrounds on both sea and land, and the simplicity of uniform color are all great touches. I can't wait to see it when it's finished.

Much appreciated, Scott!

arsheesh
06-26-2012, 01:51 AM
Now that is just lovely! I really like what you've done with the mountains. Looking forward to seeing this finished.

Cheers,
-Arsheesh

Lyandra
06-27-2012, 06:49 PM
This is starting to look awesome! Can't help you with the font. Though on old maps for example, the place names were usually written in such an elaborate way that to a "modern eye" they look illegible. So I guess at some point you have to choose between beauty and legibility...

Klaus van der Kroft
07-06-2012, 03:02 PM
Now that is just lovely! I really like what you've done with the mountains. Looking forward to seeing this finished.

Cheers,
-Arsheesh

Thank you very much, Arsheesh! This weekend I expect to get more work done. I've been experimenting with some forest-drawing styles and I'll try to get them to work (since this is the first time I draw a map using a digital tablet, I'm kind of improvising the whole drawing thing as I go!).


This is starting to look awesome! Can't help you with the font. Though on old maps for example, the place names were usually written in such an elaborate way that to a "modern eye" they look illegible. So I guess at some point you have to choose between beauty and legibility...

You have my thanks, Lyandra. And aye, it seems I'll have to do some compromises with the fonts soon; I did some testing with cities and territories, and I really need somethings readable at very small sizes. This part of the world in particular is extremely atomized in terms of territories, very much like the Holy Roman Empire during the 1500-1600, and having so many tiny states gets really confusing with the current font I'm using.

Perhaps I'll keep it for the very large names (such as water bodies and lands), and use a different one for geopolitical naming.

Klaus van der Kroft
09-11-2012, 08:38 PM
Hello, lads and lasses! Long time no see.

I finally got around experimenting with forests, and ended up with this. What do you guys think? Do they look like forests to you, or does the map look like it needs some shaving?

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In any case, it is great to be back to the drawing board. I've been away from mapping for several months and my fingers are itching!

Carbus
09-11-2012, 10:18 PM
Hello, lads and lasses! Long time no see.

I finally got around experimenting with forests, and ended up with this. What do you guys think? Do they look like forests to you, or does the map look like it needs some shaving?

48158

In any case, it is great to be back to the drawing board. I've been away from mapping for several months and my fingers are itching!

I really like your style, your landmass, mountains and forest really have that "epic" feeling of a good map! :)
Congratulations, cant wait to see more of this.

Klaus van der Kroft
09-12-2012, 10:26 AM
I really like your style, your landmass, mountains and forest really have that "epic" feeling of a good map! :)
Congratulations, cant wait to see more of this.

Thank you very much, Carbus. I'm thoroughly glad you enjoy it. I'm kind of making the style up as I go, so I keep getting this nagging feel that the map lacks drawing consistency (for instance, you can notice how the mountains in the upper-left, which were the first ones I drew in this style, are darker than the ones on the right). Still, I'm having a lot of fun drawing this piece.

Thanks again!

Eilathen
09-12-2012, 02:01 PM
Hmm...i'd say shaving ;)

More seriously, i would not see this as forest, it looks more like steppe/grasland to my eyes.

Diamond
09-12-2012, 02:53 PM
I like the forest; it's dense enough to show what it is even without labels, and then when you add those in, it'll be totally obvious what they are.

And this is a really gorgeous map, by the way.

Schwarzkreuz
09-12-2012, 03:38 PM
I agree with Diamond, i realy enjoy to watch your progress on the map, and i wouldnt the the inconsitency as something bad, its also nice to see and rethinking your process within the map.

Klaus van der Kroft
06-29-2013, 03:43 AM
Hey guys! Long time no see. I hope you've been doing great. As for myself, I just ate some amazing ribs.

Cartographically speaking, It's been a while since I've managed to dedicate proper time to map-related shenanigans, but I'm finally getting some sort of progress done with this thing.

I've been mostly experimenting with ways to get the geopolitical landscape drawn, but kept hitting a wall. Trial and error led me to this current model which, although I'm still tinkering with, is finally starting to look like what I'm after. The byzantine complexity of the various societies in Flammarion is proving to be a challenge to map, but God-willing I'll get there eventually.

Getting the names to stand out properly without breaking with the overall style of the map has also been an arduous task. I'm still not entirely convinced with what I'm using, but should work for the time being.

Here's a thumbnail version of the full map and a zoomed-in version of the area I've been focusing on so far.

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About the Graticule: Flammarion is a flat world (a disk), so I figured I should use a polar graticule to represent its diskness. Now, I'm making stuff up as I go here, so maybe I'm using the wrong one. The reason I put it in such an odd place is because I'm trying to get the map drawn from the perspective of the local civilizations (which treat the city of Mesantos as the centre of the world; cities are not pictured yet, but said metropolis would be precisely where the graticule is centred), but I'm still left wondering if it looks appropriate. What do you think?

Credits: I used one of Gilgamec's fantastic blank graticules to get the one in the map. You can find them here: http://www.cartographersguild.com/mapping-elements/19251-blank-graticules.html

EDIT: Fixed the zoomed attachment. I forgot to pass the mountains through a sharpen filter before uploading (I draw using one of those hairy brushes in Photoshop, so it needs a bit of sharpening or it looks kind of blurry).

vorropohaiah
06-29-2013, 04:39 AM
looking very nice!

Viking
06-29-2013, 12:04 PM
I really like this Klaus! I hope to see it finished :)

Klaus van der Kroft
06-29-2013, 03:14 PM
Thanks lads, much appreciated.

- Max -
06-29-2013, 04:39 PM
Looks nice though I have some comments:
The fonts used don't really match together imho. The oes on the lads looks very fine but the ones used for seas kinda clashed with the first ones (and to be honest I think it'an overseen font on mapsé and not the best legible one, especially at small size). Also I'm wondering why you need some rhumb lines since you're using some graticules. using bith are quite confusing for me on the map.
Keep up the good job :)

Klaus van der Kroft
07-01-2013, 12:11 PM
Looks nice though I have some comments:
The fonts used don't really match together imho. The oes on the lads looks very fine but the ones used for seas kinda clashed with the first ones (and to be honest I think it'an overseen font on mapsé and not the best legible one, especially at small size). Also I'm wondering why you need some rhumb lines since you're using some graticules. using bith are quite confusing for me on the map.
Keep up the good job :)

Thank you very much, Max.

About your comments:

-Fonts: Aye, I'm inclined to agree. Though I like Blackadder a lot as a font, as the time has progressed I've been growing less favourable of it, as it is very difficult to read in small size (and since I want to have every inlet and spit of land named in this thing eventually, it might end up looking bad). As for the difference in styles, I'm still not entirely decided on which fonts to use for the geopolitical landscape; the current ones are mostly placeholders to help me give shape to it, but they might end up changing soon.

-Lines: Well, technically they are not rhumb lines, as they are not following any specific geometrical orientation. They are more like referential portolan diagrams, I suppose. As for why together, on one hand there is the stylish aspect (I enjoy how they look), and on the other a practical aspect: Since Flammarion is flat and the centre depicted in this map is entirely subjective (anchored in an important cultural and political metropolis, but which is not exactly on the geographical axis of the disk), I figured the graticule alone would not be enough for navigation. After all, graticules and rhumb lines/portolan charts kept being used together for a while because the latter were still a popular method of navigations.

- Max -
07-01-2013, 12:28 PM
You're welcome :) Aren't portolan diagrams supposed to be connected? It seems they're not on the map ;)

Klaus van der Kroft
07-04-2013, 12:51 PM
Ah, yes. That was a mistake I made when I first put them in, and I was supposed to fix it eventually!

I'll try to make that "eventually" turn into a "very soon" promptly.

Klaus van der Kroft
07-10-2013, 11:39 PM
Got some more work done this evening. Went on with the main mountain ranges on the Outremer/Cyclopean-Berberati region (the lower part of the continent on the left of the map). I have decided to call my mountain-drawing process "Moustaching", since it feels like I'm painting hundreds of tiny moustaches everywhere!

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Hopefully I'll get the rivers and forested areas done this weekend, though this part of the world is pretty dry so there should be less of that, as the sun rides pretty much exactly above the main mountain range. Those oddly-shaped vertical mountains were early attempts by the cyclops of Ordobaracg to catch the sun, carving the tallest mountains in the region and then shooting harpoons the size of ships or launching themselves in alchemical balloons. They failed everytime, so every once in a while a new leader promised to get the task done and orded a new mountain carved, or in one specific case an entire mountain disasembled/reasembled on top of another mountain, which came crumbling down, was rebuilt and once again crumbled down. Eventually, they got beat to it by the more resourceful cyclops of Dhyr in the north, who built a huge spire that actually reached the sun, which stopped moving for 3 days and messed up almost every calendar in Flammarion. One of the titans hauling the sun got killed in the process and the solar disk changed its original route, which caused quite a few problems everywhere in the world.

Those cyclops were really obsessed with the sun (later guys even built their own. Their grandchildren are still trying to turn it off). On the good side, that same obsession is what in the end drove them to explore beyond the boundaries of the world and sail across the cloudy seas extending after the edges of the disk, finding new worlds in the process.

Viking
07-11-2013, 12:33 AM
Nice progress. That is a crazy story Klaus! :) This world is pretty fantastic/mythical then eh?

Klaus van der Kroft
07-11-2013, 11:42 PM
Thanks, Viking.

Yes, it's on the more trippy side of fantasy, I think, what with seas made of wine, island fishes, talking ships, clockwork people, wandering mountains, and all that. It's somewhere between 7th Sea and the Adventures of the Baron of Münchhausen, I suppose.

Freodin
07-12-2013, 07:20 AM
A great story for a great map.

There is just one thing that I really don't like about this map: the font you used for the geographical landmarks. While it looks rather good overall and in small scale, the irregular grungy look does not work in larger scales, like in the ocean names.

Klaus van der Kroft
07-12-2013, 10:55 AM
Thank you very much, Freodin.

And yes, I agree. I've been growing increasingly less happy with that font over time (it's a very nice one, don't get me wrong, but as you and others have pointed out, has several issues in this particular way I'm using it), so I'm on the lookout for an alternative. I haven't changed it yet mostly because I still haven't found a proper replacement, but its very high on the to-do list.

- Max -
07-12-2013, 11:13 AM
Looks pretty nice overall...Though, while watching it, I'm wondering if the drawing style of mountains and forests really fits with the more "political" look with colored borders.