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Midgardsormr
06-10-2008, 03:34 PM
I have a piece of terrain I've been working on, and I'm not certain what kind of scale I should give it. So, please take a look at this image and tell me how much territory do you think you're looking at?

Torq
06-10-2008, 04:06 PM
Just at a glance I would say it looks about 40 miles x 40 miles. I may be biased though because I know where it comes from.

Torq

ravells
06-10-2008, 05:23 PM
For me it's impossible to say. I can't see a 'scale clue'

waldronate
06-10-2008, 06:19 PM
Probably a few hundred thousand light years across. Unless it's not a gas density field for a galactic jet.

torstan
06-10-2008, 06:40 PM
I'd say 5-10 miles to a side - the end of a decent sized mountain or small range.

Sigurd
06-10-2008, 08:57 PM
No more than a millimeter across, corner to corner, but I'd get it treated before it grows. It looks like that white bit is dying.


- :)


Sigurd

RobA
06-10-2008, 11:51 PM
hehe-

I'd love to turn these answers into a poll!

-Rob A>

Midgardsormr
06-11-2008, 01:54 AM
Alright, so since I'm getting serious answers anywhere from 5 to 40 miles across, I'm probably safe in calling it ten miles.

Although once the suggestion that its a cosmological event got in my head, I'm having a hard time seeing something other than nebula in it. (I think, though, it's safe to say that I wouldn't describe a gas density field as "terrain.")

Thanks for the input, everyone. The lack of a scale clue was deliberate; I didn't want to influence the evaluation with anything other than the mountain itself.

Sigurd
06-11-2008, 09:10 AM
The picture obviously highlights the center. My tendency is to treat the dark area as a big obscure element. I would determine the scale based on the size of the flat bit on the middle hill\mountain. Marked with an X on the map.

What the scale is would depend on what we're looking at. I think the hills are really steep if we are looking at something beyond a dozen miles, but not impossible. How you draw trees etc would be a better indicator for scale. They could also cover up elements that look out of place at a large scale.


The attached jpg has my thoughts.

Sigurd

delgondahntelius
06-11-2008, 12:32 PM
Is that a Kermit the Frog hand puppet??

RobA
06-11-2008, 12:50 PM
Now I see it -

A fish!

-Rob A>

Sigurd
06-12-2008, 08:33 PM
Looks more like a cthulhu crocodile....


.

Robbie
06-12-2008, 10:53 PM
Oh look, a sailboat!

(Name that movie)

GlassSphere
06-12-2008, 11:20 PM
Well looking at it it depends, to me it can have two scales.

The dark green area has a nice varied texture that can make it two things

1: it's the natural texturing of a forest casting shadows on itself from above, the scale would be about 2 miles across.

2: It's the natural texturing of a mountain/hill casting shows on itself, the scale would be about 12 miles.