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Karro
06-14-2008, 11:09 PM
Okay, so I'm playing a little with mountains, trying to find the right method. Like Joe before me, I'll offer a few pics and see what people's thoughts are.

4360

The traditional version of RobA's overland map tutorial.

4361

RobA's mountain tutorial.

4362

One way of combining the two

4363

And another...

Karro
06-14-2008, 11:12 PM
And three more way of combining.

4364

4365

4366

Sigurd
06-15-2008, 10:26 AM
They all look interesting, but none of the new methods break up the mountain ridges. Since the ridges are so isolated they look unique or unnatural. They'd make great mountains for something like the boarders of Mordor where some sort of magic threw them up :) They look like some sort of Ginormous Chinese character you could see from space.

What happens if you impose one image on the other after a rotation or flip? Something to spread out the ridges and make it seem more like an irregular mound.


Sigurd

RobA
06-16-2008, 03:11 PM
OK-

Here is something I am working on.... The steps are all the same. The only difference is the start point. And this required NO "artistic ability" or hand painting/touch-up. There are still a few artifacts I am trying to figure out how to eliminate...

4386

-Rob A>

dhalsimrocks
06-16-2008, 03:24 PM
OK-

Here is something I am working on.... The steps are all the same. The only difference is the start point. And this required NO "artistic ability" or hand painting/touch-up. There are still a few artifacts I am trying to figure out how to eliminate...

4386

-Rob A>

I'm liking that. Man, it's really inspiring to see how you guys work to develop these techniques.

jfrazierjr
06-16-2008, 04:03 PM
OK-

Here is something I am working on.... The steps are all the same. The only difference is the start point. And this required NO "artistic ability" or hand painting/touch-up. There are still a few artifacts I am trying to figure out how to eliminate...

4386

-Rob A>

hmm.. how about this. Note that I did this in about 8 minutes after seeing Rob's results. Also, I did NOT spend a lot of time blending everything in as I should if I was doing a full on map for presentation.

Joe

Karro
06-17-2008, 12:32 PM
They all look interesting, but none of the new methods break up the mountain ridges. Since the ridges are so isolated they look unique or unnatural. They'd make great mountains for something like the boarders of Mordor where some sort of magic threw them up :) They look like some sort of Ginormous Chinese character you could see from space.

What happens if you impose one image on the other after a rotation or flip? Something to spread out the ridges and make it seem more like an irregular mound.


Sigurd

Hmm. I'll have to keep working, it seems. I don't perfectly like any of the results, as yet. I guess it will just take more fiddling to find something that still looks good!


OK-

Here is something I am working on.... The steps are all the same. The only difference is the start point. And this required NO "artistic ability" or hand painting/touch-up. There are still a few artifacts I am trying to figure out how to eliminate...

4386

-Rob A>

Beautiful, naturally! You have real talent!


hmm.. how about this. Note that I did this in about 8 minutes after seeing Rob's results. Also, I did NOT spend a lot of time blending everything in as I should if I was doing a full on map for presentation.

Joe

I'm still not quite sure how you do those long snaking range ridgelines. They do bear somewhat of a resemblance to what they actually look like from sat-photos (although I also think sat photos of mountains look peculiar, but you capture that in a good way!)

jfrazierjr
06-17-2008, 01:45 PM
I'm still not quite sure how you do those long snaking range ridgelines. They do bear somewhat of a resemblance to what they actually look like from sat-photos (although I also think sat photos of mountains look peculiar, but you capture that in a good way!)

Hmm.. well, in this case, I just used the same technique you used based on RobA's tutorial. I am currently working on another variation of the samething, but in this one, I just(going off of memory):


create a transparent layer
filled a random selection with a 50% gray
using a med brush set to high jitter, draw some white very squiggly lines (these are going to be the valleys in the picture)
Noise around 20-30px
Blur perhaps 10-20 px. You want to maintain a small bit of the pixelation but not too much.
new transparent layer
using the same technique you used draw your mountains on the new layer in the mostly empty areas between the blurred white/gray lines of the layer below.
use the smudge tool to clean up some of the hard lines on the edges of your mountains will help it blend in below.
merge down and bump map the whole thing.


I am also working a lot with the smudge/airbrush tool to try to get some vertical ridgelines, clefts, etc. while maintaining the "point" of most of the ridges. In a few places, I intentionally smudge the white of the ridge line to make not all of the mountain tops pointy.

Joe

jfrazierjr
06-17-2008, 10:44 PM
hmm.. how about this. Note that I did this in about 8 minutes after seeing Rob's results. Also, I did NOT spend a lot of time blending everything in as I should if I was doing a full on map for presentation.

Joe

Ok, here is an example with a slightly different technique and a bit more blending along with some terrain. Not a full map, but close enough to get an idea of how the mountains might look.

Joe

RobA
06-18-2008, 07:52 AM
That definitely looks like satellite mountains to me!

-Rob A>

jfrazierjr
06-18-2008, 08:13 AM
I'm still not quite sure how you do those long snaking range ridgelines. They do bear somewhat of a resemblance to what they actually look like from sat-photos (although I also think sat photos of mountains look peculiar, but you capture that in a good way!)

Not quite sure what you mean by "long snaking ridgelines". I just follow RobA's video tutorial process (though I have started using white and gray instead of B/W in my gradient) and just make the mountains with plenty of twists, turns and shape variation. So far, I have been using the mouse most of the time for test stuff like this, so I could probably get a bit better results if I were to use my tablet instead. Once I have the mountain shape down, I start playing with various brushes for dodge/burn, then smudge, spread, and G. blur and then usually smudge again for the Gray/White layer used as the bump map. Takes a bit of time, but really helps sell the randomness on the "slopes" and also makes the ridges less uniform and unnatural looking by "flattening" them in a few places.

Joe

Karro
06-18-2008, 09:55 AM
Joe, there was just something about the way your mountains twist and wind over the ground. But... I think I'm beginning to crack it:

4448

4449

Just playing around with the order and blend type of layers. I didn't have time last night, but I have a few other styles and techniques I plan to try out. One thing I'm trying to do here is separate the bump layers from the color, so I can lay colors on top of the bump and add effects like snow caps or forest on top of the mountains and hills. I will be playing with this further to see if I can make it work.

I think I've also figured out a few ways to make canyonlands work: using black on the bump-map layer instead of white to represent depressions, or conversely by raising the water-level setting on the bump map filter dialog, or by clicking the "invert" check box in the filter dialog.

jfrazierjr
06-18-2008, 10:15 AM
Joe, there was just something about the way your mountains twist and wind over the ground. But... I think I'm beginning to crack it:

4448

4449

Just playing around with the order and blend type of layers. I didn't have time last night, but I have a few other styles and techniques I plan to try out.

IMO, you have way to much rockiness underneath the mountains and it makes them disappear. I will say, even my latest example is not right. I was playing around yesterday and had done a bunch of smudges done, took my laptop upstairs after saving and then left the house with it unplugged and on. So I lost all of my undo buffer stuff and did not feel like starting some of the steps over again to fix the bad places. One thing I end up doing to "check it" is to play at 100+% zoom and then zoom out to make the mountains take up 1/5 or less of my screen. A lot of the time, something that looks good or even ok zoomed in looks like crap at thumbnail size, so I kind of let that be my guide and play until I get something I think looks good at both sizes.



One thing I'm trying to do here is separate the bump layers from the color, so I can lay colors on top of the bump and add effects like snow caps or forest on top of the mountains and hills. I will be playing with this further to see if I can make it work./QUOTE]

Yep, separate layers is the way to go. I try to duplicate layers, add the bump map and then overlay and blend with a layer mask and the smudge tool.

I think my biggest problem is forgetting to duplicate layers before starting the next section of work (adding blur/spread/smudge/etc) so I always have the original unaltered to go back to in I royally screw up. I really need to start being more consistent about that.

[QUOTE=Karro;23332]
I think I've also figured out a few ways to make canyonlands work: using black on the bump-map layer instead of white to represent depressions, or conversely by raising the water-level setting on the bump map filter dialog, or by clicking the "invert" check box in the filter dialog.

Yep, I figured that out a few days ago also with the invert bumpmap. I had not tried the waterlevel thing though.

Joe

Karro
06-18-2008, 01:06 PM
Yeah, I agree, these aren't perfect yet. I only had about 20 or thirty minutes last night to play around, so I had to settle for what I had after a bit.

My goal, I think, is to see if I can't come up with something a little like a cross between some of the mountains I've seen you put together combined with some like what RobA posted up thread--something with a nice looking ridgeline with occassionaly sharp looking peaks, and lots of rolling hills around it. My attempts on RobA's tutorial combined with some stuff I tried here and some ideas I have to try will hopefully get me around to that place. :)

Yeah, as for duplicating layers... I think I had two or three copies of every layer when I did these... I just wanted to make sure I still had the original in case, as like you suggested, I completely hosed it with whatever I was trying.

jfrazierjr
06-18-2008, 01:26 PM
Yeah, I agree, these aren't perfect yet. I only had about 20 or thirty minutes last night to play around, so I had to settle for what I had after a bit.

My goal, I think, is to see if I can't come up with something a little like a cross between some of the mountains I've seen you put together combined with some like what RobA posted up thread--something with a nice looking ridgeline with occassionaly sharp looking peaks, and lots of rolling hills around it. My attempts on RobA's tutorial combined with some stuff I tried here and some ideas I have to try will hopefully get me around to that place. :)

Yeah, as for duplicating layers... I think I had two or three copies of every layer when I did these... I just wanted to make sure I still had the original in case, as like you suggested, I completely hosed it with whatever I was trying.

Hmmm... I wonder how hard it would be to come up with some Script-Fu or Python-Fu to:


Duplicate a selected layer
Make the new layer invisible
Lock the new layer
Move the new layer to the bottom of the layer list.


Joe

RobA
06-19-2008, 09:04 AM
Here you go, Joe (not sure what you mean by "lock the layer"... link it's position, or lock its alpha (so I didn't include that). Just save it as a scm file in your scripts and assign it to a hot key:



(define (script-fu-joesaction img inLayer)
(let *
(
(new-layer (car (gimp-layer-copy inLayer TRUE))) ;create a duplicate
)

; it begins here
(gimp-image-undo-group-start img)

;copy the layer
(gimp-image-add-layer img new-layer -1) ; create the copy as a new layer
(gimp-drawable-set-visible new-layer FALSE) ; set invisible
(gimp-image-lower-layer-to-bottom img new-layer) ; move to bottom
(gimp-image-set-active-layer img inLayer); set active layer back to initial layer
;done
(gimp-image-undo-group-end img)
)
)

(script-fu-register "script-fu-joesaction"
"<Image>/Filters/Joe Action"
"4 steps."
"Rob A"
"Rob A"
"June 2008"
""
SF-IMAGE "image" 0
SF-DRAWABLE "drawable" 0
)

jfrazierjr
06-19-2008, 10:01 AM
Here you go, Joe (not sure what you mean by "lock the layer"... link it's position, or lock its alpha (so I didn't include that). Just save it as a scm file in your scripts and assign it to a hot key:


Damn... Thanks Rob! I owe you like 10 points of rep and counting now... I don't think I will ever be able to catch up.... heh...

Joe

RobA
06-19-2008, 10:11 AM
No problem. Little scripts like this are quite trivial to knock out.... and I don't really understand scheme... I just copy from existing scripts.

-Rob A>

jfrazierjr
06-19-2008, 10:27 AM
Ok, so just for the heck of it, I decided I would play with this map and actually try to get something completed. I deleted a few layers under the mountains and redid them to make them look a bit better.

Also, I kind of played with a new technique on the shoreline to indicate shallow water. Basically, I had a separate mask layer for the shore line. I selected and saved this as a path. Then, I set up the airbrush tool with a large fuzzy brush and a light blue color (almost white) and quite a lot of jitter. Select the paths tool, right click, stroke path, and select airbrush. Poof, a nice quick way to make some shallow water area. The jitter is used to make it somewhat more random distance from the actual shore line as it is drawn. Anyway, I kind of like the effect I got from it.

Joe

Karro
06-19-2008, 03:28 PM
So... we use, say, notepad, and throw that code into it and save it down as .scm instead of .txt and then put it in the scripts folder? Then it'll be listed in our scripts when we open GIMP again?

Cool...

I'm going to have to learn this. It looks like pretty simple code, but it's been 5 years since I've done any kind of coding but HTML and CSS.

That's looking cool, Joe!

Hopefully, I'll get a chance after a few days to play around again. Been really busy, and look to be busy for the foreseeable future. I'm in hard job-search mode, at the moment, so pretty much all my free time that isn't used up with the fiancee is spent looking for a new job... and that's cutting into my mapping time. :(

RobA
06-19-2008, 04:39 PM
So... we use, say, notepad, and throw that code into it and save it down as .scm instead of .txt and then put it in the scripts folder? Then it'll be listed in our scripts when we open GIMP again?

Yep. Or just Xtns->Script-fu->Refresh Scripts from the main Gimp window.

-Rob A>

jfrazierjr
06-19-2008, 08:44 PM
A bit more....

Joe

jfrazierjr
06-20-2008, 03:45 PM
Ok, played with swamps and then added rivers. Ran out of time after I had messed up my rivers, so will go back and redo that later tonight when I get home.

Joe

Karro
06-21-2008, 03:07 PM
Okay.... Some changes and updates to the style. This here's going to be an image dump, and some of these are only subtly different than the others.

4519

4520

4521

4522

4523

Karro
06-21-2008, 03:10 PM
And a couple few more.

4524

4525

4526

So... I think I'm getting close. I think the second, seventh, and to some degree the eighth are really getting close to what I want.

I need to test out if I can have a forest rolling over the hills and how that will look.

jfrazierjr
06-21-2008, 04:36 PM
And a couple few more.

4524

4525

4526

So... I think I'm getting close. I think the second, seventh, and to some degree the eighth are really getting close to what I want.

I need to test out if I can have a forest rolling over the hills and how that will look.

I actually like 5,6 and 8 the best. The others just don't have enough black to give an illusion of depth and look like my first tries in that they look like they just have texture over top.

8 without the underlying hills stuff is the best, you just have to get a good method of getting the hills represented to make it a bit more believable. I really think now that using RobA's method of making mountains with the angular gradient is the basis for the right way to do this for the actual ridgelines. It just needs some extra love and care to make it not quite so "plasticy" and then a good transition to the "hills". I think I ended up using 5 or 6 layers total to get something I liked for my previous posts. I really think that once you get the mountain ridges right and looking somewhat beleivable, then the blending is going to come with some playing.

Joe

Karro
06-22-2008, 12:17 AM
I actually like 5,6 and 8 the best. The others just don't have enough black to give an illusion of depth and look like my first tries in that they look like they just have texture over top.

8 without the underlying hills stuff is the best, you just have to get a good method of getting the hills represented to make it a bit more believable. I really think now that using RobA's method of making mountains with the angular gradient is the basis for the right way to do this for the actual ridgelines. It just needs some extra love and care to make it not quite so "plasticy" and then a good transition to the "hills". I think I ended up using 5 or 6 layers total to get something I liked for my previous posts. I really think that once you get the mountain ridges right and looking somewhat beleivable, then the blending is going to come with some playing.

Joe

Yeah, I'm using between eight and ten layers on most of these. I've got a wide, noise bumpmap layer, then a middle-range ridge layer (or two in most cases) that I think is pulling from some of the techniques you described, then I used RobA's angular gradient for the highest peaks. In some cases, I used duplicate bumpmaps with the duplicate on a lower opacity. Then there were a three color layers--a base color layer that's a color gradient on the same noise layer used to make the noise bumpmap, then a color gradient on the base gradient that became the ridges, then a color layer with some faint white where the highest peaks go to represent the perpetual snowline.

I was thinking that 5 and 6 had a little too much black, but I think I can find one that's midway between less black and more black. How's this?

4534

Karro
06-25-2008, 07:07 PM
Well... I tried this map technique out with a forest rolling over part of the mountains.

It didn't turn out as well as I'd like. The mountains by themselves look okay, I think. the forest by itself also looks fine. The two together, though, don't seem to work.

4630

then with the color layers in a different order:

4631

Any thoughts on how this might be done better?

Finis
06-25-2008, 07:37 PM
What has been working fairly well for me (at least, I like the result) is to use Ascension's technique for trees and kind of brush them on a layer over my base or mid range mountain layer.

However, I kind of reverse the order he shows in his tutorial. first I apply the layer styles to the trees and reduce the fill to zero, then I use the splatter brush to very carefully stroke them on. This gives kind of 'instant feedback' when applying them, rather than painting a bunch on, applying the styles and finding out you went way over board

thats what I did in these (crops from my larger map in my Intro thread)

torstan
06-26-2008, 03:21 AM
Karro, you need to have the trees stop half way up the mountain side. There's a tree-line on mountains, above which they don't grow. So it's going to look strange if there's a forest right over the top of your mountain.

Karro
06-26-2008, 11:34 AM
What has been working fairly well for me (at least, I like the result) is to use Ascension's technique for trees and kind of brush them on a layer over my base or mid range mountain layer.

However, I kind of reverse the order he shows in his tutorial. first I apply the layer styles to the trees and reduce the fill to zero, then I use the splatter brush to very carefully stroke them on. This gives kind of 'instant feedback' when applying them, rather than painting a bunch on, applying the styles and finding out you went way over board

thats what I did in these (crops from my larger map in my Intro thread)

Is that in Photoshop or GIMP? Either way, I need to go back and look up Ascension's technique!


Karro, you need to have the trees stop half way up the mountain side. There's a tree-line on mountains, above which they don't grow. So it's going to look strange if there's a forest right over the top of your mountain.

Yeah, I thought about that, but I also thought about the mountains in the Appalachians, and how they're mostly covered in trees... There, I've been to above 4,000 feet and had trees around me. So... how high to trees normally reach?

Anyway, I was going to try to go back and blank out the trees primarily around the ridgeline.

jfrazierjr
06-26-2008, 11:38 AM
Is that in Photoshop or GIMP? Either way, I need to go back and look up Ascension's technique!



Yeah, I thought about that, but I also thought about the mountains in the Appalachians, and how they're mostly covered in trees... There, I've been to above 4,000 feet and had trees around me. So... how high to trees normally reach?

Anyway, I was going to try to go back and blank out the trees primarily around the ridgeline.


Though I am by no means an expert, I seem to recall hearing something around 5000-7000 feet is where most treelines top out on average

Of course, I could be remembering something totally different such as the approximate number of feet in a mile... My brain is a sponge for information, keeping it slotted in the right spot... that's a different story...

Joe

Karro
06-26-2008, 11:41 AM
Though I am by no means an expert, I seem to recall hearing something around 5000-7000 feet is where most treelines top out on average

Of course, I could be remembering something totally different such as the approximate number of feet in a mile... My brain is a sponge for information, keeping it slotted in the right spot... that's a different story...

Joe

I feel your pain... I truly do. I think I have the exact same condition.

That's probably about right, though.

torstan
06-26-2008, 12:07 PM
Yep, I thought about that too. It may be more that trees can't grow on the windswept mountain tops than there being a hard altitude limit. The tops of all the Scottish mountains I've climbed have been treeless and they are only 1000m or so. Also, the steeper the cliff, the less likely there will be trees on it, so the sharp ridges on those mountains are going to be relatively tree free no matter what.

waldronate
06-26-2008, 02:54 PM
Tree line is one of those things that it determined by both altitude and altitude (or, if you prefer, by soil depth, temperature and water mobility). So there are places in the warmer latitudes where tree line is 12000+ feet and places where tree line is at sea level (these are arctic steppes). http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2003.01043.x has measurements in the middle of the document.

Karro
06-26-2008, 03:32 PM
So much complexity...

Well, here's another go:

4658

I just used a jittery brush to clear out the forest mask along the ridgeline. The hard part was going back and trying to add a bumpmap on the new edge of the forest....

jfrazierjr
06-26-2008, 03:43 PM
So much complexity...

Well, here's another go:

4658

I just used a jittery brush to clear out the forest mask along the ridgeline. The hard part was going back and trying to add a bumpmap on the new edge of the forest....

Yea, and now your mountain has a green tinge....:(

Karro
06-26-2008, 04:40 PM
Yea, and now your mountain has a green tinge....:(

Yeah, I thought that, too... which was strange because I had masked out the ridge on the color layers, too.

So... I went backwards, hiding each of the forest layers in turn, watching the ridge where the forest surrounds it, just to make sure. In actuality, there was no change to the ridge... The green was there all along, even in the original mountains.

I figured it must look greener because of the surrounding forest, sort of an optical illusion.

Anyway, it's still not working for me, but this represents only about 15 minutes of additional effort over the previous attempts.

Karro
06-27-2008, 10:53 AM
What has been working fairly well for me (at least, I like the result) is to use Ascension's technique for trees and kind of brush them on a layer over my base or mid range mountain layer.



I went back and looked at Ascension's tutorial on Photoshop Trees...

Really, I can't follow it. Not the tut's fault, but it very quickly starts making references to features I'm not sure GIMP has. Can GIMP, for instance, do size jitter? I would use such a thing if I had it... :( And that's a fairly basic one... most are more complicated than that and I can't figure out how to achieve the same effect in GIMP...

Guess I'm going to have to start playing on my own in GIMP...

RobA
06-27-2008, 11:18 AM
I went back and looked at Ascension's tutorial on Photoshop Trees...

Really, I can't follow it. Not the tut's fault, but it very quickly starts making references to features I'm not sure GIMP has. Can GIMP, for instance, do size jitter? I would use such a thing if I had it... :( And that's a fairly basic one... most are more complicated than that and I can't figure out how to achieve the same effect in GIMP...

Guess I'm going to have to start playing on my own in GIMP...


Nope- no size jitter, no rotation jitter. Brush dynamics in GIMP are quite a bit behind photoshop (at least in some areas). Size jitter doesn't bother my that much, as you can tie size to tablet pressure, but no help if using a mouse.

It is pretty easy, however to create a custom brush that provides random size and rotation jitters...Just not as flexible.

-Rob A>

Karro
06-27-2008, 03:21 PM
Nope- no size jitter, no rotation jitter. Brush dynamics in GIMP are quite a bit behind photoshop (at least in some areas). Size jitter doesn't bother my that much, as you can tie size to tablet pressure, but no help if using a mouse.

It is pretty easy, however to create a custom brush that provides random size and rotation jitters...Just not as flexible.

-Rob A>

Does it have to be done via an animated brush? I haven't tried my hand at that, yet...

jfrazierjr
06-27-2008, 03:47 PM
Does it have to be done via an animated brush? I haven't tried my hand at that, yet...

I would believe anything the GIMP guru says. RobA kind of told me how to do this in another post just a few days ago, and he used some of the same techniques in his post today to make the palm trees. From what I understand, you make 1 layer for each individual thing. So, if you want 10 squares at different sizes you make one per layer, set them all visible and save it as a GIMP pipe brush (or whatever). Then, when you select the brush, pencil, or airbrush tool and that "brush" as you stroke, it will cycle between the layers to spit out the image on said layer. Not easy, but it's once and done. If you want to test it, just to two layers with drastically different shapes or colored thingies and then give it a try. I hope to make a few copies with different colors of my hand drawn mountains in the next few days and post them up for everyone to use(assuming I get it done and assuming it looks ok).

Joe

torstan
06-27-2008, 03:54 PM
One thing that is worth noting is that if the images in the brush are greyscale then they will draw the given image with the colour you pick for the brush. So a black circle will actually draw a red line if red is picked. Shades of grey going to white correspond to transparency for these brushes. Therefore you could create a greyscale mountain brush with different mountains in it. Then the user could paint with it with whatever colour they wanted - or even check the use colour from gradient button and pick a nice mountain gradient (say the default Gimp browns gradient) to draw mountains with a nice variation in colour.

Karro
06-27-2008, 03:58 PM
I would believe anything the GIMP guru says. RobA kind of told me how to do this in another post just a few days ago, and he used some of the same techniques in his post today to make the palm trees. From what I understand, you make 1 layer for each individual thing. So, if you want 10 squares at different sizes you make one per layer, set them all visible and save it as a GIMP pipe brush (or whatever). Then, when you select the brush, pencil, or airbrush tool and that "brush" as you stroke, it will cycle between the layers to spit out the image on said layer. Not easy, but it's once and done. If you want to test it, just to two layers with drastically different shapes or colored thingies and then give it a try. I hope to make a few copies with different colors of my hand drawn mountains in the next few days and post them up for everyone to use(assuming I get it done and assuming it looks ok).

Joe


One thing that is worth noting is that if the images in the brush are greyscale then they will draw the given image with the colour you pick for the brush. So a black circle will actually draw a red line if red is picked. Shades of grey going to white correspond to transparency for these brushes. Therefore you could create a greyscale mountain brush with different mountains in it. Then the user could paint with it with whatever colour they wanted - or even check the use colour from gradient button and pick a nice mountain gradient (say the default Gimp browns gradient) to draw mountains with a nice variation in colour.

Cool. I will be trying this asap.

jfrazierjr
06-27-2008, 04:07 PM
One thing that is worth noting is that if the images in the brush are greyscale then they will draw the given image with the colour you pick for the brush. So a black circle will actually draw a red line if red is picked. Shades of grey going to white correspond to transparency for these brushes. Therefore you could create a greyscale mountain brush with different mountains in it. Then the user could paint with it with whatever colour they wanted - or even check the use colour from gradient button and pick a nice mountain gradient (say the default Gimp browns gradient) to draw mountains with a nice variation in colour.

Oh DAMN! Rob told me this the other day when I was doing my hand drawn "V" mountains with the whole smudge thing and asked how to get it to pick a random series of images to paint, but it did not sink in what he said about the whole grayscale aspect.

Thanks for the follow up clarification Torstan!

Joe

RobA
06-27-2008, 04:08 PM
Here is a tutorial (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=1124) I made a while back back on setting up a rotating brush (so it angles in the direction you paint). The exact same process for random, just pick "random" rather than "angular" in the Ranks section of the save dialog.

-Rob A>

Ascension
06-27-2008, 04:36 PM
From what I've gathered about GIMP is that you can paint with those tubes where you can use a series of different images as the brush tip shape...Photopshop can not do that, to my great chagrin. If it did my map making would not take so long. Paint Shop Pro uses tubes as well but I can't make it work right for me. I have GIMP but can't wrap my brain around it, sort of like PS when I first started that. So I would think that tubes would be the work-around for my PS techniques...I think it was RobA who just posted a palm tree tube today so that would be a good place to start. In the end, it was because I didn't have tubes to use that I made up my own technique...I love to fiddle. If anyone could adapt my techniques for GIMP they could get themself insta-rep for the tutorial. Hrm, maybe I should learn how to use GIMP more proficiently :)

Edit: Dang, 5 replies while I was typing all of this...maybe I should learn how to type more proficiently.

jfrazierjr
10-14-2008, 12:58 PM
OK-

Here is something I am working on.... The steps are all the same. The only difference is the start point. And this required NO "artistic ability" or hand painting/touch-up. There are still a few artifacts I am trying to figure out how to eliminate...

4386

-Rob A>


Ummm you never showed us how to do this!!!! Please YodA, please???

Karro
10-14-2008, 01:07 PM
Ummm you never showed us how to do this!!!! Please YodA, please???

I thought the same thing as I went back through these posts a few minutes ago for heathan666's post.

jfrazierjr
10-14-2008, 01:26 PM
I thought the same thing as I went back through these posts a few minutes ago for heathan666's post.


Heh... while I am happy with my existing technique for mountains, I would still love to see any alternate methods, cause sometimes, you just feel like something different will work better for a particular map. Hopefully, YodA will show us the ways of the force....;)

Karro
10-14-2008, 01:31 PM
Heh... while I am happy with my existing technique for mountains, I would still love to see any alternate methods, cause sometimes, you just feel like something different will work better for a particular map. Hopefully, YodA will show us the ways of the force....;)

Right you are... sometimes you just need something different.

However... I fear we will have to unlearn what we have learned.

RobA
10-14-2008, 02:44 PM
LAWKS!

For the life of me I can't remember where I was going with that teaser....

-Rob A>

jfrazierjr
10-14-2008, 02:57 PM
LAWKS!

For the life of me I can't remember where I was going with that teaser....

-Rob A>

ROFL... you must be getting old. That should teach you to post the tutorial as soon as you have the sample ready so you don't forget about it!:roll: