PDA

View Full Version : Silembria



Kurvstol
06-22-2008, 08:40 AM
First post by me on this forum :D

The attached map shows a coastal region bordered by two mountain chains in the east and north and a river to the west.

Working resolution was 2000x2000 and the map is made in Gimp and Inkscape. Thanks to RobA of this forum for inspiration and Andrew Law for his tutorial on mountains [http://hapimeses.com/tutorial.htm]

feedback and comments are greated with great thanks :idea:

Sigurd
06-22-2008, 11:08 AM
I like it. It feels free and unconstrained.

You might add some blue for the rivers and seas but the style is very pleasing. If the white ribbons are rivers you may want to disconnect the two systems where they join above the central forest. ROBA is the recognized river cop but I think the water in that joining section (right above the central forrest) would either go east or west towards one of the river mouths. I don't think it would stay continuous river across the middle.


Sigurd

Kurvstol
06-22-2008, 11:46 AM
thanks for your thoughts Sigurd :)

The white ribbons is supposed to depict the major rivers of the region, and as you say it could need some color to be better defined :)

Ascension
06-22-2008, 12:20 PM
I gotta agree with Sig on the crosspiece of the "H" shaped river system. If the river actually had hard enough rock or high enough ground to split it that way, then one of the forks would die off in favor of the path of least resistance. Overall though, it's very clean and right on target, look good, feels good.

Keep it up

Kurvstol
06-22-2008, 12:35 PM
I'm starting to agree with Sigurd aswell :) the "middle" river segment has for the better part become a pain when I started to mark the map with communities and so forth.

Thanks for bringing this to my attention ;)

Sigurd
06-22-2008, 01:48 PM
I'm starting to agree with Sigurd aswell :)



AH wonderful, that makes 2! Only 6,704,845,724 to go for world accord.


Sigurd

RobA
06-22-2008, 06:58 PM
Hi!

Nice map composition, over-all. As pointed out, the cross connected rivers are so unlikely, there is less than a handful of such cases in the real world. If, however, it is some form of man-made connection/canal, then keep it.

Also, were the rivers in Inkscape? I would be nice if they tapered, and got wider as they progressed. I can give some suggestion on how to accomplish that if so.

-Rob A>

Kurvstol
06-23-2008, 05:55 AM
The river was supposed to be natural in my original thought, so it is now gone :P
I'm uploading the revised map (with some additions as roads and communities)

With that said the map is finished on my part :)

Still, I would really like to hear your suggestions on the river-tapering in Inkscape RobA, since the map is the start of a D&D-campagin I intend to create and Silembria will have neighboring realms ;)

NeonKnight
06-23-2008, 05:57 AM
That is a very nice looking map.

Kurvstol
06-23-2008, 06:05 AM
thank u NeonKnight :)

jfrazierjr
06-23-2008, 08:58 AM
The river was supposed to be natural in my original thought, so it is now gone :P
I'm uploading the revised map (with some additions as roads and communities)

With that said the map is finished on my part :)

Still, I would really like to hear your suggestions on the river-tapering in Inkscape RobA, since the map is the start of a D&D-campagin I intend to create and Silembria will have neighboring realms ;)



Very nice Kurvstol! I have a couple comments.

* In the forests on the left (mainly) there is a section at the top that is very fuzzy and then in the middle gets more sharp lines as it goes down. Was this intended? If not, you may want to try to make all the forests bits more uniform. From what I see, that area seems to indicate deeper forests due to the number of lines compared to there sections of forests on the map, so you may indeed be trying something specific there.

* The two rivers on the right have a hard line where the river color meets the ocean, while the one on the left blends into the underlying white very nicely and makes it looks like the river is carved into the land mass. I know alot of this is due to the underlying parchment background, so you may want to try to smudge the area around the river mouths carefully. or erase some of the background layer around the mouths.

* If you feel like spending the time, you may want to try using the smudge tool on the mountains a bit. The ones at the top have a nice bland to them and the lines get sharper the closer you get to the bottom. Also, some of your larger mountains might be made better with a few very thin white lines carefully blended (again, using the smudge tool) into the shadow sides) Now, this may be what you are after, and if so, ignore this. Heck, ignore the whole post if you want since this is just an opinion.

With that said, for me, the river mouths is the only thing I would really suggest changing if nothing else.

Joe

Kurvstol
06-23-2008, 11:37 AM
Thanks for the comments Joe :)

I agree on the forest and the river-issue. Unfortunately I've been somewhat sloppy regarding saving the map layers so it will be to much tideous work to fix this :P

The last tip/comment will most likely be tested and integrated in my future maps ;)

jfrazierjr
06-23-2008, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the comments Joe :)

I agree on the forest and the river-issue. Unfortunately I've been somewhat sloppy regarding saving the map layers so it will be to much tideous work to fix this :P

*sigh* I know how you feel. In many of my "play maps" I have been pretty darn loose with layer management and then got screwed when I wanted to tweak something later. Thanks a ton goes to RobA who built a quick script for GIMP that will duplicate a layer, make the original invisible, and move the old layer to the bottom. That way, I have a quick way to get back to the "source" layer in case I do stupid stuff.



The last tip/comment will most likely be tested and integrated in my future maps ;)

Umm,, which comment was that?

Kurvstol
06-23-2008, 02:52 PM
Ah! the tip considering smudge-tech on the mountains:



* If you feel like spending the time, you may want to try using the smudge tool on the mountains a bit. The ones at the top have a nice bland to them and the lines get sharper the closer you get to the bottom. Also, some of your larger mountains might be made better with a few very thin white lines carefully blended (again, using the smudge tool) into the shadow sides)


Will test that in my next map containing mountains :)

jfrazierjr
06-23-2008, 03:27 PM
Ah! the tip considering smudge-tech on the mountains:



Will test that in my next map containing mountains :)



Ah yea... I can't take credit for it though. If you want to see more and get some good instructions, go to the Featured Maps and find the Manthria map here:http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=499 by Sir Alain.

And here is a direct link to his tutorial. Note that his tutorial assumes (instructs) you to do this in B/W, but the process can be used in any event in color, you just have be a bit more careful. http://www.santharia.com/workshop/maps_1.htm Page 6 is where he does the mountains.

I played with it and now the smudge tool is my new favorite toy! I seem to be trying to do do everything with it now.... What I did the first time I was playing with this was to smudge the original mountain lines. While this looked ok, I was a bit sloppy and some of the hard lines were blurred when they should not have been (ie, the mountain shape). After a second play, what I did was to do my upside down 'V's on their own layer, with NOTHING else. Duplicate and add the various shading colors and smudge and then move the original back over top to get my hard line back in case I messed up the working layer. VERY NICE technique. If anyone's interested, I will post up a few different types of samples from what I played with.


Joe

Joe

Midgardsormr
06-23-2008, 04:36 PM
If anyone's interested, I will post up a few different types of samples from what I played with.


I'm interested! Manthria is one of my favourites, too, and any variations and commentary on that style are quite welcome.

jfrazierjr
06-23-2008, 10:37 PM
I'm interested! Manthria is one of my favourites, too, and any variations and commentary on that style are quite welcome.



Here are a few examples of the same mountains with different backgrounds. One is a png so you can get the transparency, the others are just jpg to keep the file size down a bit.

I also played around several weeks ago with more of a "craggy" random line mountains with lots of hooks and crags and stuff, but that was much more of a 90 degree from the side view. I loved the look, but don't really have something I can use and unfortunately, I did not save my samples.

While I think the results are great, this is not something where you would want to do 100s of mountains manually. This would KILL your wrist unless you have enough patience to do a few and the come back later and repeat this process(which I just don't have). If I was to want make a large number of mountains for a map of this type, I would probably figure out how to make 5-10 base template brushes or something like that in GIMP and carefully brush them into a picture with alternating brushes. This is also exactly what the creator of the Manthria map suggests also. Hmmm.... anyone know if GIMP has a way to create a "brush set" and have it alternate between the various brushes as you stroke on the map? I assume the answer is no, but it never hurts to ask eh...

Start to finish, this took me around 30-40 minutes or so to build up the mountains and then blend in with the smudge tool before I saved the results. Hope you enjoy.

Joe

Kurvstol
06-24-2008, 09:38 AM
Decided to post a black and white version of the map :)

Please tell me which version you think looks the best ;)

RobA
06-24-2008, 09:43 AM
anyone know if GIMP has a way to create a "brush set" and have it alternate between the various brushes as you stroke on the map? I assume the answer is no, but it never hurts to ask eh...

Actually, Yes.

It is called an image pipe, or tube, or hose, or animated brush. (The file extension is .GIH for "Gimp Image Hose")

The easiest way (in this case) is to make each image its own layer. Set them all to visible, then save the file as whatever.gih to you brushes folder. The save options can be confusing, but there is a good (if old) reference here (http://adrian.gimp.org/gimppipe/). Refresh the brush list and you can use it.

If the image is colour with alpha, it will only paint in colour (like the ivy brush that comes with Gimp). If it is B&W, then it will use the foreground colour, with the greyscale level being the transparency.

If you make up such a brush please post it in the resource section!

-Rob A>

jfrazierjr
06-24-2008, 12:03 PM
Actually, Yes.

It is called an image pipe, or tube, or hose, or animated brush. (The file extension is .GIH for "Gimp Image Hose")

The easiest way (in this case) is to make each image its own layer. Set them all to visible, then save the file as whatever.gih to you brushes folder. The save options can be confusing, but there is a good (if old) reference here (http://adrian.gimp.org/gimppipe/). Refresh the brush list and you can use it.

If the image is colour with alpha, it will only paint in colour (like the ivy brush that comes with Gimp). If it is B&W, then it will use the foreground colour, with the greyscale level being the transparency.

If you make up such a brush please post it in the resource section!

-Rob A>

Might get around to that in the future. I realized AFTER I posted the above (figured out how to make a regular brush) that since I had alpha on the brush, when I painted some of the lines intersected from one brush to another and it looked rather bad. What I will probably do is create 4-5 mountain templates as bases, make copies of those with a few different color schemes (light brown, gray, dark brown, etc) and then save as a big pill of brushes grouped by the "background color".

What does everyone think of the actual mountains themselves though? I tried to make the "dark" side have enough variation and with the smudges, I think it looks very nice. I also smudged the "V"s just a bit, especially at the bottoms to try to get them to blend into whatever is underneath instead of just being a solid black end to a line.

Joe

jfrazierjr
06-24-2008, 12:08 PM
Decided to post a black and white version of the map :)

Please tell me which version you think looks the best ;)

I have to say that I really prefer the color one because with the shapes of your trees, without color, it is hard to know for sure that they are supposed to be forests, ESPECIALLY the pointy ones at the top and right side (where you might mistake them for pointy hills or small mountains. Now, if you did B/W and had a different style of trees, then that might be a different story.

Also, with the B/W for a base, you could always copy it and come back in with a color wash(like a lite/muted water color) to give it just a tinge of colors and that might look good, but not sure as it's an idea that just popped into my head.

RobA
06-24-2008, 03:02 PM
Still, I would really like to hear your suggestions on the river-tapering in Inkscape RobA, since the map is the start of a D&D-campagin I intend to create and Silembria will have neighboring realms ;)

Here is a quick how-to I wrote up in the tutorial forum. (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?p=23901)

-Rob A>

Midgardsormr
06-24-2008, 07:34 PM
What does everyone think of the actual mountains themselves though?

I think they look great!

jfrazierjr
06-24-2008, 11:19 PM
I think they look great!

Thank ye!

Joe