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Redstar
06-24-2008, 03:50 PM
Hey everyone,

I'm new to the community, but have always enjoyed the painstaking time and effort it takes to construct an amazing map for my D&D games. Here is the latest map I'm working on, which is an urban campaign that takes places exclusively on, below, above, under, and around the city.

I'm not sure about the colors yet, and I'm still thinking of ways to better convey the shallow waters. Also, if anyone has any tips for drawing a flooded cemetery I would be interested in hearing!

Thanks

jfrazierjr
06-24-2008, 04:06 PM
Hey everyone,

I'm new to the community, but have always enjoyed the painstaking time and effort it takes to construct an amazing map for my D&D games. Here is the latest map I'm working on, which is an urban campaign that takes places exclusively on, below, above, under, and around the city.

I'm not sure about the colors yet, and I'm still thinking of ways to better convey the shallow waters. Also, if anyone has any tips for drawing a flooded cemetery I would be interested in hearing!

Thanks

Welcome to the Guild Redstart! Interesting concept with the background.

Joe

ravells
06-24-2008, 07:50 PM
Hi Redstar - and welcome to the Guild!

The colours work fine for me (it's a tried and tested colour combination) - did you make the map with CC3? I really do like the way you've depicted the buildings - it works well to the perceived scale of the drawing. It's a really convincing map. Presumably there are more buildings to come?

If shallow waters are to be an important part of the map, you could contours, but I'd suggest not having them outlined in black and maybe feathering them a bit.

NeonKnight
06-25-2008, 02:49 AM
The map is very evocative of the Waterdeep map for Forgotten Realms around the 90's. My only suggestion (and it's only a suggestion based on my preference) is to make the buildings a different color than the ground, to give it a little contrast.

RobA
06-26-2008, 08:25 AM
Hi Redstar-

Thanks for joining up and showing us your work. I like the map colours, as well. As suggested, setting the building fill to something other than the ground would help them to stand out.

As to the cemetery - how about just drawing the usual items (crypts, large tombstones, paths, etc) then using water colours in the flooded areas? I might make it clearer, too, if you only make a portion of the cemetery flooded.

-Rob A>

Redstar
06-26-2008, 03:31 PM
Thanks for the feedback everyone!

On colors: I actually color selected them directly from the Waterdeep City of Splendor book. :D I have a bad eye for colors, so I wanted to start with something that i perceived as looking good. I was worried the water looked a little too sky-like. I might add a texture to it.

Production: I drew the outline by hand, scanned it, tweaked the contrasts and now am laying out all the buildings in Flash (the pen tool is easier for me to use). For the gradients I'm just going back and forth between photoshop and flash with outlines and then importing a background image in flash.

It's still a WIP for sure. The buildings will be colored in, maybe adding some shading in the alleys to draw a distinction from the streets. That's for the ideas for the cemetery. I'll dabble with it and see what I come up with.

Stay tuned.

Ghalev
07-01-2008, 02:00 PM
Excellent stuff. I agree with NeonKnight that the evocation of the Waterdeep style is very strong (in a good way); takes me back to FR1 in a heartbeat. I've always appreciated that style, and yours is looking to be a top-notch example of it.

Redstar
07-04-2008, 05:34 PM
Well, here is the latest. The buildings are coming slowly (argh! hand drawing!) but the largest area is almost done, which also contains the most small buildings (the slums). The other areas are smaller with larger buildings, so they should go quick.

I just went with white for the buildings to give them some contrast to the background. If I have time, I want to use a small palette of 3-4 colors for them. Any comments on the drop shadow? Keep it?

There is also a draft for the flooded abandoned docks/cemetery in the west.

Finally, I want to add ridges to the back side of the hills and perhaps some more elevation lives.

Any other comments would be greatly appreciated! :D

Ascension
07-04-2008, 07:12 PM
So far so good I say. Keep it up.

delgondahntelius
07-05-2008, 01:56 AM
Well, here is the latest. The buildings are coming slowly (argh! hand drawing!) but the largest area is almost done, which also contains the most small buildings (the slums). The other areas are smaller with larger buildings, so they should go quick.

I just went with white for the buildings to give them some contrast to the background. If I have time, I want to use a small palette of 3-4 colors for them. Any comments on the drop shadow? Keep it?

There is also a draft for the flooded abandoned docks/cemetery in the west.

Finally, I want to add ridges to the back side of the hills and perhaps some more elevation lives.

Any other comments would be greatly appreciated! :D

elevatioin lives .... oooooo what's that??? heh.

Looking good, and in this style of map, I personally wouldn't go with drop shadows..the buildings being so close together it might clutter it up too much. You might cut some time out of your day by using something like Illustrator or Inkscape... Xera also would probably work well to take some time off of use the pen too so much ... Photoshop has a pen tool as well, I find it works pretty good for something such as this... not quite as versatile as Illustrator, but it can get the job done...

awaiting the next wip :D

Redrobes
07-05-2008, 08:22 AM
Very nice map on an opening post. Welcome and have some 'rep' :)

Redstar
07-05-2008, 04:24 PM
elevatioin lives .... oooooo what's that??? heh.


ELEVATION LIVES! .... you get the idea. :)

Thanks everyone. Hopefully I'll get some more done this weekend.

Redstar
07-17-2008, 10:48 PM
So, here is WIP numero 3. I completely redid the colors, because I felt like the last few WIPs had more of a "tropical getaway" and not a "city of larceny and murder", which is what Fogdown is! 8) It's just just a piece of the city though. I need to finish penning out the buildings to the south.

A few thanks for this one: RPGMapmaker for his Brushes (when you need a compass on the rush!), RPMiller for inspiring style (the bandit camp rocks my socks), and Andy Law (who did Freeport's incredible map).

Of course all comments and critiques are welcome, a few things I'm particularly interested in hearing from others about:

1) I beveled the houses to try and give them a "roof" look. They looked too flat before and need a little pop. Any thoughts? Do they look like stones? any suggestions?

2) I put in a water texture I found and I thought it added a lot ot the map, but I wasn't sure if it was too texture-y for the other parts of the map

3) Mountains - do the elevation lines (LIVES!) work?

4) I green-shifted the "flooded cemetery" - does it just look like someone airbrushed a section of the city?

5) Are the roads too bland? They look like they are paved in vanilla icecream to me... like the off-white, "old fashion" kind they sell by the gallon.

EDIT: 6) And scale please :)

Thanks!

thebax2k
07-18-2008, 12:34 AM
Redstar, I must say, that is one nice looking map. I look forward to when the entire map is complete.

As to your points:

1. I like what you did with the houses. They are distinct without being so cg and "plasticy" that they draw attention away from the rest of the map.

2. The water looks nice. Although I suspect you'd be better keeping it as is, being a fan of the old Darlene Greyhawk maps, I'd recommend you experiment with different blue and green colors and hues to depict different water depths. The harbors will not have an extreme variation, but the depth will drop off as you get beyond the island. If you think that depicting water depth would make the map too kaleidescopic, just forget it.

3. I like the elevation lines, nothing needs to be changed.

4. The cemetery does look a bit weird. I don't know if you should use transparency or shading effects, but there's got to be a better way to denote that its flooded. Right now it looks like pools in a level ground area.

5. Just remember the KISS principle for roads and houses. They look fine as they are--don't try and get overly elaborate, it will just clutter up the map.

One set of structures that I would mention for the south part of the city (or at least in an area thats walled off and controlleable) are granaries. An island city the size of yours (I'm guessing the population is in the tens of thousands) would require an enormous amount of food to keep fed. Obviously, the food is going to be shipped in--but there should be a controlled place to store it besides the warehouses near the docks (as a safeguard against food riots).

In any event Redstar, your map is shaping up into one of the better city maps I've seen on the guild. Keep it up and good luck to you.

Ghalev
07-18-2008, 12:40 AM
1) I beveled the houses to try and give them a "roof" look. They looked too flat before and need a little pop. Any thoughts? Do they look like stones? any suggestions?

I thought the flat roofs fit the overall style just perfectly, but these bevels are very subtle and well-integrated.


2) I put in a water texture I found and I thought it added a lot ot the map, but I wasn't sure if it was too texture-y for the other parts of the map

Again, subtlety is the key to your success. The pattern is faint and suggestive and the colors sufficiently desaturated to make it evocative. The same pattern used more clumsily could be gaudy and distracting, but you sidestepped that trap, I think.


3) Mountains - do the elevation lines (LIVES!) work?

Given the Waterdeep-style inspiration, absolutely yes; they fit right in. That aside, I think they create a vague impression that the city is otherwise flat ... I'm not sure if that's the impression I should really be getting.


4) I green-shifted the "flooded cemetery" - does it just look like someone airbrushed a section of the city?

Yes; I find that element calls attention to itself as more explicitly digital.


5) Are the roads too bland?

I don't think they are, no. The contrast is a goodly, valuable, legible and friendly contrast.


EDIT: 6) And scale please :)

The bar itself could use just the faintest whiff of character to bring it in line with your other typographical choices, IMO. As for the overall scale of the city, it seems modestly and very believably-scaled for a trad-fantasy medieval-type burg.

... and if you're looking for some recommended additions, it'd be nice to see some conspicuously large structures that suggest some local equivalent of arenas, cathedrals, etc.

delgondahntelius
07-18-2008, 04:22 AM
So, .....Condensed...... Thanks!

1. Swweeeeeeeet. I love that look, you've really nailed it and I don't even know what 'it' is.... but I love that look. You must teach me your ways sifu.

2. That water texture is nice. Very subtle and very greyhawk, which I'm a fan of. I like it, I like it a lot. Leave it BE! :)

3. In my eyes, Elevation lines need to die... I've never been a big fan of elevation lines, and in my minds eye, it does detract a bit from the overall 'city' map. This however is a personal observation, probably not the best advice I suppose. I think a subtle gradient might be more effective, a painterly version of topography lines.

4. I like the look, but I might not blur it quite as much. However I think it works the way it is... I like it.

5. The roads are fine. I know the urge to want to add something to it, I get that urge all the time. But you can step back and ask, does it accomplish what I need it too? ... if so, then your best bet is to leave it as is. Adding some grunge to the street might otherwise detract and clutter up an already beautiful map. The roads work for me! If you really don't like the vanilla flavor... try some shade toning for the background, maybe you'll find a more pleasing and less 'vanilla' color. Perhaps add a hue/saturation layer, colorized, and mess with the levels on it.... something subtle.

6. SCALE!!! I love scale.... lets me know how far I have to go before I can find a room at the Do Drop Inn. Or how many alley's there are and how far each one is away from the other when delivering a large sum of larcenous wealth from one fence to the other. It works for me.

Seriously tho, this is one excellent looking map, it is something I will benchmark any future city maps in this style.... most assuredly ... REPPED :D

Turgenev
07-19-2008, 05:38 PM
Love the map! Here's some rep to you for such great work. A couple minor points. Is that suppose to tbe the grave yard in the bottom left corner (of the last map)? I don't get a flooded feel to that section. I'm also wondering why there would be a series of large docks connected to the graveyard. Historically, ancient graveyards were often located outside of settlements (for superstitous and health reasons). Obviously, you're free to do as you wish for a fantasy based map. ;)

I do find the Fogdown (love the name BTW) logo a bit distracting from the map. I would either reduce the side and tone down the font a bit but that may be just me.

Over all, very nice work!

Ghalev
07-20-2008, 12:15 AM
Historically, ancient graveyards were often located outside of settlements (for superstitous and health reasons).

That's very broadly true in many cases, but it could be misleading to turn such a generalization into a design rule, especially in the present context (a trad-fantasy high-medieval-inspired city layout ... and one that has evidently grown to fill an island, no less).

Medieval urban cemeteries (and ossuaries, and crypts) are still present in towns and cities that survive from the medieval era (not just in Europe, but in other parts of the world as well). There are a raft of them that we know of, and more being discovered all the time (from small-time crypts of petty lords to full-scale finds like the one in Leicester just a couple of years ago -- a huge urban cemetery attached to the medieval-era church of St. Peters, with well over a thousand graves). Medieval cemeteries were church-driven affairs, and if we peek into church-law history of that time we notice all kinds of (in retrospect, amusing) references to the cemetery traditions ... they were so closely associated with settlements, large and small (especially on the grounds of the parish churches) that laws had to be written to prevent them from being trodden on during fairs, kept from the livestock, and so on. These didn't involve building them far from where people lived, though, only building walls around them and enforcing rules of civilized graveyard behavior (please don't let the kids dig up Bishop Michaels, plz). Secular law tells us a lot, too (medieval Paris had multiple urban cemeteries, and there were legal difficulties with crooks using them as hiding-and-skulking territory).

Add to this the nature of town growth ... some churchyards (and their attendant cemeteries) would be located on (for example) a small hill just outside of a trading town in the later middle ages ... but then when that town grew, that small hill would find itself at the edge of town, and then somewhere in the middle, with the cemetery still there.

Quite a lot of medieval cemeteries were moved away from the towns in later (post-medieval) centuries (for example, all the medieval graves in Moscow were exhumed and moved out of town due to health concerns in the 18th century) but those were the result of later-period understanding of the health issues (coupled, it must be noted, with later period misunderstandings of the health issues).

It's true that some cemeteries were deliberately placed far from towns for superstitious reasons, but those were usually a case of ethnic, religious, or moral divisions (separating pagan burial from Christian, for example, or burying women judged "indecent" in unconsecrated graves away from "decent" folk as a kind of petty post-life punishment) ... but some of those traditions didn't really crystallize until (again) later periods, depending on the specifics.


Obviously, you're free to do as you wish for a fantasy based map.

We don't know the full extent of medieval urban burial practices because so much of this stuff has been lost/paved over/removed over the years (even some very famous medieval cemeteries - including the largest one in medieval Paris - are long-gone, existing only on old maps or in legal documents), but we do know it was, historically, a common practice to have urban cemeteries in medieval (and earlier) times, in Christian Europe and in the cultures of the Near East, Asia, etc. Given how many such cemeteries we do know of, though - either because we can visit them physically or read about them in religious and secular writings of the time - it seems a little unfair to imply that an urban cemetary is somehow a "fantasy based" element.

While there have been many cultures in history that have - at certain times - kept graves away from cities - there are plenty that haven't, so either choice is just as "historical" as any other; no general rule applies.

Given that the layout here is (A) obviously high-medieval-Europe inspired and (B) obviously an homage to Waterdeep on the visual level (a fantasy burgh which features a huge necropolis) and (C) at least apparently, a city that has grown to fill it's entire island space over time [meaning that even if that western edge was outside of town and hidden by trees long ago, it's swallowed up now], it would seem wrong for there not to be a graveyard.

IMO, of course.

No clue on the cemetery docks, though. Someone else will have to field that puppy :)

ETA: The romantic in me has chosen to temporarily suppose that the graveyard is the original structure on the island, a place to bury folk who were killed by some magical plague, or maybe to bury pirates or something else badass ... and that the docks are old rotted things that were used by the earliest folk to land here, before there was a town of any kind ... but of course I'd be much more interested to know the real tale, especially if there's treasure or a few hit point-losses to be had in it.

Edits: Various small repairs to sentences, augmented structure, etc. As long as I'm going to ramble on at length it may as well amount to a presentable mini-article ;)

Turgenev
07-20-2008, 02:51 AM
That's very broadly true in many cases, but it could be misleading to turn such a generalization into a design rule, especially in the present context (a trad-fantasy high-medieval-inspired city layout ... and one that has evidently grown to fill an island, no less).

You make some good points and I was thinking specifically of bronze age sites (mainly Bronze age Greek/Mycenaean sites - that's my personal specialty) which really doesn't fit this type of medieval city. I guess my brain was stuck in Classics mode (I was checking out some interesting archaeological sites just before I posted). It really does depend on the specific culture and time period so anything is possible (especially once you add the fantasy element).

I also got thinking about the docks at the grave yard and I thought that maybe the local clergy (of a sea god?) maybe offer burial at sea. This religious service may need to be offered separate from the commercial docks, hence the docks at the graveyard. It could also be used by smugglers or slavers looking for a backdoor entrance into the city. Anything is possible with the right idea. :idea:

It is such a cool map, I can wait to see the finish product.

Ghalev
07-20-2008, 03:14 AM
I also got thinking about the docks at the grave yard and I thought that maybe the local clergy (of a sea god?) maybe offer burial at sea. This religious service may need to be offered separate from the commercial docks, hence the docks at the graveyard.

Oooh, I like that one.

Something like that might make for a fun contest for the forum: post a map with a feature that seems at first glance to be out of place or inexplicable, then hold a contest for the coolest / most campaign-juicing explanation :)

You could call the contest "a map never tells the whole story" :)

Midgardsormr
07-20-2008, 07:45 PM
I have one: The docks are provided for a mythical soulship, which is said to take the spirits of the departed across the sea to the land of the dead.

Ghalev
07-21-2008, 02:18 AM
I have one: The docks are provided for a mythical soulship, which is said to take the spirits of the departed across the sea to the land of the dead.

Very nice!

Here's another (sadly, pretty dull) one: this cemetery wasn't built slowly over time, it was constructed rapidly (possibly because of a mass death, possibly because it's been moved from another location) so the docks were constructed for all the barges carrying the stonework for the crypts and markers.

Sigurd
07-21-2008, 02:33 AM
Here's another (sadly, pretty dull) one: this cemetery wasn't built slowly over time, it was constructed rapidly (possibly because of a mass death, possibly because it's been moved from another location) so the docks were constructed for all the barges carrying the stonework for the crypts and markers.


Sepulcher Island

Perhaps the docks were constructed to haul barges of the dead away to a sacrificial island on the horizon. From that island the spirits are closer to the sky and carried away by the rising sun.

The island may only be visited by the anointed few. Not all bodies dumped on this island are dead however owing to misdiagnosis or ????. Horrifically, the island has a small ragged population of ghouls and scavengers who loot the bodies of the slain and try to survive on an inhospitable rock.

The anointed kill this rabble on site as pirates or worse.....


Sigurd

Redstar
08-04-2008, 12:26 AM
Just finished up WIP number 4 and thought I would put it up before bed. I think it's coming along. Just a few things left to do I would say. I'll post some other comments and what not tomorrow. As always CC's are welcome.

Cheers!

PS: I have to say those ideas for the cemetery are great! I originally had just thought maybe it was an old dock, was in disuse, the land was cheap and they needed it for the bodies so they converted it into a cemetery but after a fairly nasty hurricane the area became permanently flooded. I hope you guys don't mind if I incorporate some of your ideas! :D

loogie
08-04-2008, 01:39 AM
mmmmmmm drown zombies.

love the map... looks great

the little circle thingy... i don't even know what it is at the top... its a bit odd, if you explained it, or its part of your campaign, then its all good.. i'm just curious as to what its is (mostly cause i think it looks so cool :P)

Redrobes
08-04-2008, 04:51 AM
This is very sweet - my vote for a featured map ! I like a lot of things about it. Sensible fortifications, sand banks, houses grouped, color - actually havent anything bad to say about it. Well done.

Ascension
08-04-2008, 06:21 PM
Looks very nice, I like the color scheme and the layout. I tend to suspend my own logic when it comes to looking at maps so I don't even care that there isn't any real farmland to feed a city of that size. With such an extensive network of docks I'm assuming that this is very much a maritime culture with a huge navy and commerce...sorta like the Minoans. That lil thingy at the top looks sorta like a minimap and I think I like that idea...might have to try it myself.

Ghalev
08-04-2008, 06:30 PM
Looks very nice, I like the color scheme and the layout. I tend to suspend my own logic when it comes to looking at maps so I don't even care that there isn't any real farmland to feed a city of that size. With such an extensive network of docks I'm assuming that this is very much a maritime culture with a huge navy and commerce...sorta like the Minoans.

There are many other examples, too ... really, only in stock fantasy worlds are cities required to be surrounded by farmland :) Early Novgorod had no outside-the-walls farmland at all, for just one example ... but heavy river-traffic (and a bit of cart-traffic) did the trick. And that's without any handwaving or magic to ease the strain. A cool climate helps, of course!

Edited to Add: I think it's kinda cool that most of the threads on WIPs tend to branch off into unrelated worldbuilding matters in addition to cartographic matters, but is there a site etiquette for requesting cartography-only critiques with no worldbuilding tangents?

Redstar
08-04-2008, 07:23 PM
There are many other examples, too ... really, only in stock fantasy worlds are cities required to be surrounded by farmland :) Early Novgorod had no outside-the-walls farmland at all, for just one example ... but heavy river-traffic (and a bit of cart-traffic) did the trick. And that's without any handwaving or magic to ease the strain. A cool climate helps, of course!

Edited to Add: I think it's kinda cool that most of the threads on WIPs tend to branch off into unrelated worldbuilding matters in addition to cartographic matters, but is there a site etiquette for requesting cartography-only critiques with no worldbuilding tangents?

I agree it is pretty cool to have a lively discussion about general world building. I would say if the OP has questions specifically about mapping, then those should be the focus, else, it's all good :) The comments have really sparked my imagination about issues and features of the city.

In regards to food: scarcity is actually one of the defining features of Fogdown, thus the reason why the city is divided into districts by walls and its large thief population. It's in an effort by the Lawful Neutral/Evil rulers to contain poverty (and the rampant crime that comes with it) to the north. Think: Johannesburg - industrialized (and in Fogdown, also magical), but ruthlessly class divided in a neo-apartheid fashion.

On the "mini-map": actually it's the beginnings of a compass/rose :)

Ghalev
08-04-2008, 07:29 PM
I agree it is pretty cool to have a lively discussion about general world building. I would say if the OP has questions specifically about mapping, then those should be the focus, else, it's all good :) The comments have really sparked my imagination about issues and features of the city.

Yeah, this has been a good thread ... but I'm just wondering if there's a polite way to say "worldbuilding questions and comments are inappropriate for this thread" without ruffling any feathers, for those of us who might want (in our own WIP threads) to focus 100% on cartography. If it's just a matter of politely asking, that would be cool ... but since I'm still a n00b here I'm just curious if there's a specific etiquette or tag for it.

Midgardsormr
08-04-2008, 07:31 PM
Usually a gentle, "yeah, but what about the map?" suffices to get folks back on topic. To be honest, I find it rather extraordinary that we stay on topic as much as we do, rather than wandering off into discussions of hadron collanders.

Back to the point... the flooded cemetery looks much better. Though now I'm having images of corpses floating off and washing up on beaches elsewhere around the island.

Ghalev
08-04-2008, 07:35 PM
Back to the point... the flooded cemetery looks much better. Though now I'm having images of corpses floating off and washing up on beaches elsewhere around the island.

Well, given that food is scarce anyway ...

[eww!] :)

Midgardsormr
08-04-2008, 07:59 PM
Now I'm wishing I could give negative rep...

Just kidding.

Turgenev
08-04-2008, 10:02 PM
I'm thinking that the flooded graveyard may bring in scavengers from the sea to feed on the bodies so it might be a good place to fish. Course there could be social/religious constraints about eating any of these fish/sea creatures. Who wants to eat a fish that might have been feeding on one's dead relatives. ;)

I've also been thinking about the mountains. Perhaps the poorest of the poor can't afford a sea burial and are forced to bury their dead in holes dug into the mountain. Perhaps an area of the mountain would hold a pauper's grave where the dead are dropped into deep pits.

Just some ideas to mull over. Great map, Redstar. Keep up the great work.

Redstar
08-05-2008, 09:28 AM
I've also been thinking about the mountains. Perhaps the poorest of the poor can't afford a sea burial and are forced to bury their dead in holes dug into the mountain. Perhaps an area of the mountain would hold a pauper's grave where the dead are dropped into deep pits.
.

Well, that's what the crematorium is for, outside the cometary :) They couldn't bury anyone else there once it was flooded so... but mass cannibalism sounds like an interesting twist as well. :idea:

EDIT: I think just including "no world building comments please" would be fine. You usually see "comments and criticisms" or "CC's". Not much different I think. Then again, I'm also a n00b on the boards so feel free just to ignore me :)

Mulliman
08-09-2008, 04:25 PM
There are many other examples, too ... really, only in stock fantasy worlds are cities required to be surrounded by farmland :) Early Novgorod had no outside-the-walls farmland at all, for just one example ... but heavy river-traffic (and a bit of cart-traffic) did the trick. And that's without any handwaving or magic to ease the strain. A cool climate helps, of course!
The city of Venice had as its main problem to secure safe trade routes for grain shipping for the entirety of its existence. This, and to procure wood for the fleet, was a strong reason for its hold over Dalmatia. The rest of the maritime empire always came second.


Edited to Add: I think it's kinda cool that most of the threads on WIPs tend to branch off into unrelated worldbuilding matters in addition to cartographic matters, but is there a site etiquette for requesting cartography-only critiques with no worldbuilding tangents?

Since the absolute majority of the maps on here have fantastical origins, wouldnt it be awfully dull not to be able to discuss the thought-process that preceeded the map creation? :)

Sagenlicht
09-22-2008, 08:05 AM
It's a great map Redstar :)

Hoping for a new WiP soon :)

mmmmmpig
09-25-2008, 03:30 PM
I like the thought process involved with generating the map and all of its pieces, but I am left wondering about your choice of compass rose in the upper left hand corner. It seems to be of a completely different style than the rest of the piece both in style and placement. Just my 2 cents