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View Full Version : Players Map Handout - The Known Area



Chgowiz
01-22-2009, 09:14 AM
Map (click to enlarge)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_l4jb15kBpW8/SXf53FNvH0I/AAAAAAAAAJo/uVSZM-Sb7lY/s320/PlayersMapDaleDarkwoods2.png (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_l4jb15kBpW8/SXf53FNvH0I/AAAAAAAAAJo/uVSZM-Sb7lY/s1600-h/PlayersMapDaleDarkwoods2.png)

Artists Notes:

This map was created as a player handout for the kickoff of my "old school" OSRIC (http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/)/1st Edition D&D game - The Dark Ages (http://www.obsidianportal.com/campaign/the-dark-ages). The final product will be printed on cotton paper, then treated to a simple aging process (http://www.curbly.com/DIY-Maven/posts/863-How-to-Antique-Paper) and the edges torn to make it look realistic. I'm very pleased with the results.

The map was created using GIMP 2.6 - the initial document size was 3000x2250 at 300ppi. I work in Ubuntu and I use an old-school Wacom Intuos serial tablet. The map image shown above had the canvas resized so that it was square to be uploaded to the Obsidian Portal map manager. The actual document will fit on a 8.5x11 landscape page.

The hardest part was the trees. I've struggled with the ZombieNirvana method of making trees and I was never truly satisfied with the end results. After seeing this post about old Russian maps (http://makingmaps.wordpress.com/2009/01/13/map-symbols-trees-forests-on-old-russian-maps/) on the Making Maps DIY blog (http://makingmaps.wordpress.com/), I had found my answer and stole the concept.

I created two layers of tree pattern fills and tinkered with the layer masks. I had to go around each edge of the pine tree areas to properly masking the trees right so they looked natural. I then filled in the background color with a waterpaint brush.

The clip art was unashamedly used from openclipart.org (http://www.openclipart.org). I downloaded the SVG outline files, imported them into GIMP then traced over them to make them look more "rough" and hand drawn.

So that's about it. Thank you to those of you who've put up with my patient questions over the past 9 months or so. This map wouldn't be without your input and suggestions.

Gandwarf
01-22-2009, 11:16 AM
Chgowiz, nice map. It looks simple (only a few colors/symbols), but it's elegant and a great handout. Repped!

Bohunk
01-22-2009, 11:20 AM
Agree with Gandwarf, nice map. Repped as well.

joćo paulo
01-22-2009, 01:52 PM
I say...good thoo!

Chgowiz
01-23-2009, 10:56 PM
A quick followup - I printed this map and made a player prop with it. I have some photos at this blog post: http://oldguyrpg.blogspot.com/2009/01/map-prop-prep.html

Karro
01-30-2009, 09:47 AM
Nice process for aging the map.

I imagine, though, that I'd tear the edges first before doing some of the other steps to make sure that the torn edges don't look freshly torn, but worn with age as well.

Chgowiz
01-30-2009, 09:50 AM
Nice process for aging the map.

I imagine, though, that I'd tear the edges first before doing some of the other steps to make sure that the torn edges don't look freshly torn, but worn with age as well.

On this particular map, I didn't have enough space to tear it, and it ended up working out - as the players were buying this as a "fresh copy" straight from the man who had created it.

That's good advice about aging the tears. That part of the treasure map that's missing... :D

Karro
01-30-2009, 10:32 AM
That's what I'm talking about!

Glad it worked for your players!

jfrazierjr
01-30-2009, 10:42 AM
Now... anyone have any ideas about how you would do this with a map that was to large for a standard oven and sheet pan? Say, for example, one wanted to have GP print out a poster size map and then distress it after the mail drops it on our front door.

Chgowiz
01-30-2009, 01:41 PM
Now... anyone have any ideas about how you would do this with a map that was to large for a standard oven and sheet pan? Say, for example, one wanted to have GP print out a poster size map and then distress it after the mail drops it on our front door.

Get a bigger pan/oven? :P

How I would do it would be to lay out tin foil (ohgods, I just said "tin" foil.. jeez, how old am I? Aluminum foil!) and create a "drying pan" from it. I'd still do the hot coffee technique that I listed above (and possibly rip it prior to the coffee if you wanted that look).

Instead of the oven, I'd try a hair dryer on low (at first, until I got bored, impatient or figured out that high would not burn or ruin the paper) and try to dry it that way. If you're really patient, and your significant other doesn't mind, you could let it dry naturally, after mopping up the excess coffee. The trick is to have the aluminum foil "pan" be sealed at the edges/bottom so that you don't drip coffee through it. I'm not responsible for ruined carpets or tables.

I would probably experiment with this first before doing this on a real life poster sized map. Any chance you could get a blank sheet or two for practice?

jfrazierjr
01-30-2009, 02:14 PM
Get a bigger pan/oven? :P

How I would do it would be to lay out tin foil (ohgods, I just said "tin" foil.. jeez, how old am I? Aluminum foil!) and create a "drying pan" from it. I'd still do the hot coffee technique that I listed above (and possibly rip it prior to the coffee if you wanted that look).

Instead of the oven, I'd try a hair dryer on low (at first, until I got bored, impatient or figured out that high would not burn or ruin the paper) and try to dry it that way. If you're really patient, and your significant other doesn't mind, you could let it dry naturally, after mopping up the excess coffee. The trick is to have the aluminum foil "pan" be sealed at the edges/bottom so that you don't drip coffee through it. I'm not responsible for ruined carpets or tables.

I would probably experiment with this first before doing this on a real life poster sized map. Any chance you could get a blank sheet or two for practice?


Hmmm now that I think about it, something like a washing machine/air conditioner drip pan would be close to the right size, but that might be a bit expensive. I think my thought was more along the lines of the quick drying part since thats really what i think "burns" the stain into the paper itself. I would think that natural drying or even a hair dryer would work, but would not look anywhere near as good as if you could dry it really fast. Also, the natural curls would proably not be anywhere as good with slow drying as with an oven method.

Chgowiz
01-30-2009, 02:25 PM
Hmmm now that I think about it, something like a washing machine/air conditioner drip pan would be close to the right size, but that might be a bit expensive. I think my thought was more along the lines of the quick drying part since thats really what i think "burns" the stain into the paper itself. I would think that natural drying or even a hair dryer would work, but would not look anywhere near as good as if you could dry it really fast. Also, the natural curls would proably not be anywhere as good with slow drying as with an oven method.

You're probably right about that, unless you had a couple of hair dryers cranking away. Although... if you're going for stained/weathered - the fact that it wasn't baked might lend some interesting effects. My paper "hardened" a bit from the drying and coffee, although I don't know if it was because of the heat or the wet/drying.

That's why I was suggesting some experimentation might help. Unless you know someone with a pizza oven...

jfrazierjr
01-30-2009, 02:47 PM
Hmmm now that I think about it, something like a washing machine/air conditioner drip pan would be close to the right size, but that might be a bit expensive. I think my thought was more along the lines of the quick drying part since thats really what i think "burns" the stain into the paper itself. I would think that natural drying or even a hair dryer would work, but would not look anywhere near as good as if you could dry it really fast. Also, the natural curls would proably not be anywhere as good with slow drying as with an oven method.

You're probably right about that, unless you had a couple of hair dryers cranking away. Although... if you're going for stained/weathered - the fact that it wasn't baked might lend some interesting effects. My paper "hardened" a bit from the drying and coffee, although I don't know if it was because of the heat or the wet/drying.

That's why I was suggesting some experimentation might help. Unless you know someone with a pizza oven...


The problem I have with a hair drying is the "wind' I would want something more like radiant heating method so that the "pooled" liquid evaporates rather than blowing away.

Funny thing is that 15 years ago, I worked at a pizza place and we had very large sheet pans... but that does not help me now... I guess i would have to actually come up with some large pan and some type of enclosed box system with a heating element below it to really get what I am thinking of, but that would be bulky and expensive..

Steel General
01-30-2009, 02:50 PM
Funny thing is that 15 years ago, I worked at a pizza place and we had very large sheet pans... but that does not help me now...

I was just thinking that a sheet tray and a pizza oven would be perfect (if you can convince them to let you use it). I also worked at a pizza place (many moons ago) - we had 24x36" pans we used for tray pizza's (roughly equivalent to 2x16" pies)

Chgowiz
01-30-2009, 03:05 PM
I guess i would have to actually come up with some large pan and some type of enclosed box system with a heating element below it to really get what I am thinking of, but that would be bulky and expensive..

You are in my head. Get out. LOL...

Seriously, I have one of those old fashioned radiant heaters with the wire elements. If you rigged up a reflector out of aluminum foil (here we go with the foil again..) and had it pointed at your previously created foil "pan", you might get more bake than evap. Or a heat lamp, those things can get seriously hot. I had a mechanic's light that had a large aluminum disc 'reflector' and that thing would put out some serious heat. Just some thoughts. I'm tryin' here... >:)

Ascension
01-30-2009, 04:22 PM
I just use the tea and candle method...soak it in tea (for how long is up to you), blow dry, then hold the edges over a candle flame. Here are some other ideas: http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~roy/magictalk-wisdom/discussions/aging_paper.html