PDA

View Full Version : Which Software to Use?



voidgere
02-06-2009, 12:24 AM
I got a rough map, but I want to make it better.

I have an old copy of CC, Photoshop and Fireworks. I want to take the map, import it, and draw over it. Then begin to add terrain and other objects.

Does anyone have any suggestions what software I might use to accomplish this?

Bohunk
02-06-2009, 08:11 AM
My main software is photoshop elements. I create the worlds in Fractal Terrains then make them into maps using pse 7. For your question I would use pse. Welcome to the guild!

edit: oh and lets see the rough map!

Steel General
02-06-2009, 08:14 AM
First off... Welcome Aboard! Drop a post in the introductory froum (if you haven't already).

I use photoshop for nearly everything I do mapping wise, for what you are wanting to do I agree with Bohunk that PS (or GIMP) would probably be best.

voidgere
02-08-2009, 06:04 PM
What is the difference between PS and Elements? I cant see the difference?

Steel General
02-08-2009, 06:05 PM
Not exactly sure, but I would guess the Elements doesn't have some of the functionality that a full-blown version of PS would have.

Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will be along shortly to better answer your question.

ravells
02-08-2009, 06:11 PM
There is a comparison here (http://graphicssoft.about.com/cs/photoshop/f/elementscompare.htm) between the two. Of all the differences from the point of view of mapping, not having layer masks in elements is a pretty big drawback IMO. Having said that Bohunk produces some of the nicest maps around, and has just won two monthly contests back to back, so it can't be that much of a disadvantage!

Welcome to the Guild, btw!

voidgere
02-08-2009, 06:14 PM
Then I will uninstall elements and keep photoshop. I would rather have tools that i might not need then not have tools i find out I need.

bartmoss
02-10-2009, 03:46 PM
I do my mapping in Inkscape. Free, and you can't beat it at that price. ;)

NeonKnight
02-10-2009, 05:09 PM
Well, I know CC (which version are you using exactly? CC2?) will allow for importing as a BMP or PNG for drawing over and what not.

WhiteRabbit
02-11-2009, 01:27 PM
Not exactly sure, but I would guess the Elements doesn't have some of the functionality that a full-blown version of PS would have.

Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will be along shortly to better answer your question.
The difference, apart from the layer masks, is the absence of the CYMK color correction module - which is what makes Photoshop a 1st class professional product for the printing and graphics industry.

Adobe has finally figured out that no one else on the planet needs/wants that feature unless you work in printing/graphics industry.

In other words, stripped down versions of Photoshop are just fine for 99.9% of the public and will never even know what features are missing from the main professional product.

Asharad
02-11-2009, 08:27 PM
layer masks are very important to me :)

jfrazierjr
02-11-2009, 09:17 PM
layer masks are very important to me :)

layer masks are VITAL to me. Would spend way to much time screwing with changing things without them.

Bohunk
02-11-2009, 09:25 PM
layer masks are very important to me :)


layer masks are VITAL to me. Would spend way to much time screwing with changing things without them.

This works fine for me.

http://www.photoshopessentials.com/basics/elements/fake-layer-mask/page-2.php

I toyed with the idea of getting ps for the $700 ($400 on ebay, but that makes me nervous), but in the end I decided that I really didn't need all that. Getting pse and premier elements (combined on bestbuy.com) for $80 was fine. If you buy ps for maps that is like using a hand grenade to kill a bee.

voidgere
02-11-2009, 11:05 PM
...i like hand grenades.

And a friend of mine (who is a professional photographer), gave me his copy of PS 7 when he upgraded recently.

So I got 700 dollar software for free? hmmm, maybe a case of beer wasn't payment enough....next stop, liquor store!!

layer masks, ive seen them but never toyed with them. CYKM? never even heard of that but i might have seen that in the same menu that i use to change between RGB and Indexed colors.

jfrazierjr
02-11-2009, 11:47 PM
layer masks, ive seen them but never toyed with them.

That should be your first goal to learn then. It just so happens that I have a GIMP tutorial that goes over the basics of layer masks and pretty much all of the ideas can be transferred to PS. Also, Del. made one just for PS since it has some layer mask options GIMP does not have. Check my sig for the link to mine...

voidgere
02-11-2009, 11:59 PM
Holy smokes!!!

That is the damnedest tutorial ive read so far. It gave me several ideas alone. I think with a few more days of these tutorials, I will have enough to actually begin my first map.

jfrazierjr
02-12-2009, 10:15 AM
Holy smokes!!!

That is the damnedest tutorial ive read so far. It gave me several ideas alone. I think with a few more days of these tutorials, I will have enough to actually begin my first map.

ummmm is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Midgardsormr
02-12-2009, 02:20 PM
CYKM? never even heard of that but i might have seen that in the same menu that i use to change between RGB and Indexed colors.

CMYK stands for Cyan Magenta Yellow and Black. Those are what are known as the process colors and are used for subtractive color mixing, like paint or ink. Yellow and Blue make Green.

Since your monitor works in the RGB additive color space, most of the time there is no reason to work on a document in CMYK. The only time you'd need to do that is if you had print samples you were working from and wanted to precisely match colors. Otherwise, even if you're working toward print, most printers can easily convert from RGB to CMYK. The colors won't match precisely, but they never will unless you use a colorimeter to calibrate your monitor. The only reason to need that, though, is if you're doing serious professional graphic design work.

Ahem. /color theory lesson.

voidgere
02-12-2009, 06:27 PM
ummmm is that a good thing or a bad thing?
That is a very good thing. Thank you for the information. And the same to you, Midgardsormr. I like knowledge for the sake of knowing.

CRasterImage
02-13-2009, 11:10 AM
The colors won't match precisely, but they never will unless you use a colorimeter to calibrate your monitor.

Actually, CMYK has a smaller color range than RGB. Meaning, RGB can depict some colors that CMYK cannot. Notably the vibrant edges of the RGB range near pure red, pure blue and pure green. When those colors are reproduced in ink, they are not as vibrant. They have to allow some white to show through, (low K) in order to get the brightness needed. Which tends to make the color more pastel. Rather than vibrant. (vibrant = high saturation + brightness)

Redrobes
02-13-2009, 07:17 PM
Lots of tech info about bitmaps and color spaces on my tut...
http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=2596