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Korba
03-19-2009, 05:55 PM
In an attempt to learn more of the techniques here in the hope that will help me develop my own style i have just about got something ready to post after quite a bit of planning.

My main interest is getting a realistic layout for my maps based on fairly accurate geology and climate models so I'm going to create a world from scratch, follow the steps below and then pick particular continents/island/region and map them in more detail in a particular style depending on the tutorial I'm following at the time.

The world is called Calen Ndor which in my best pidgin Tolkien means "Green Land". Thanks for reading and if you spot any mistakes or have any pointers they will be gratefully received.

Steps I'm going to follow to get the world:
• Plate boundaries
Draw basic plate boundaries
Decide on plate movement at boundaries

• Major relief
Create rifts at divergent plate boundaries
Create mountains at convergent
Create fault lines at transform boundaries
Add island chains / atolls

• Temperature
Incoming solar radiation

• Wind patterns
Effect of Hadley cells
Add effect of Coriolis
Add effect of mountains blocking air currents

• Ocean currents
Temperate from hot to cold
Effect of wind
Effect of coastline
Wave direction strength on erosion

• Rainfall
Rainfall follows winds
Mountain ranges cause rain areas and rain shadows
Effect again of Hadley cells
Frequency and amount

• Vegetation
Combine frequency of rainfall, amount of rainfall and terrain to map vegetation.

• Rivers and lakes
Add depending on rainfall and relief

• Civilizations
Final stage to be decided

Korba
03-20-2009, 06:40 AM
I ran out of time last night to post the actual progress so far.

First stage the plates:
Using tectonic plates to draw a world map (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=2238) by dhalsimrocks is a very useful tutorial for this stage. I drew eight random plates.

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I picked one a jagged section of plates to run the whole length of the world moving apart. at the opposite boundary i had the plates coming together.

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The Green lines are where plates are spreading apart at constructive (divergent) plate margins and the blue lines at destructive (convergent) margins. The unmarked lines will either be transform faults or inactive.

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The next stage was a lot of trial and error creating a new layer and just sketching with a large soft green brush to get the land areas in the right places. to give a balance of land and sea.

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I wanted the land to cross the plate margins because that gives the more interesting features. I had in mind (very generally):
constructive margins at sea create mid ocean ridges
constructive margins on land create rift valleys

destructive margins at sea create island chains
destructive margins on land create large mountain chains
where ocean plates meet land plates it forms mountain chains

Based on this and my land and plates i could add the major relief features.
Brown are the mountain ranges and the light green rift valleys.

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I'm going to tweak the land masses slightly no doubt but these will do for the moment.

Lathorien
03-20-2009, 12:06 PM
I love building and watching a world built like this, Keep Going!

Korba
03-20-2009, 05:31 PM
Thanks for the support Lathorien :)

I used the very rough island outlines and RobA's Making Not So Random Coastlines in GIMP (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=874) in Photoshop to create a more realistic coastline. It was absolutely perfect for the island chains, i selected each one in turn with a lasso tool and used the threshold adjustment to get them nice and broken up.

The main island shapes need a bit of work but that will vary depending on river paths, mountains, deltas and ocean currents so they can stay as are for the time being. The island chains I'm very pleased with.

This gave me a slightly tidier version of my last map. Dark green will be mountains and light green rift valleys.

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To go onto the next section i needed to add the important latitude lines. From a climate point of view these are the equator (0), 30 and 60 degrees rather than the 23 and 66 degrees usually marked on a map (tropic of Capricorn, Cancer, the Arctic and Antarctic circles).

I'm going to ignore any axial tilt (which produces the seasons). these can be added later when needed to add spice to an individual map. Instead I'm going to assume all incoming solar radiation is equal. This is obviously greater at the equator at less towards the poles. This means ignoring all other factors the temperature map of Calen Ndor looks as below:

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The next stage gets into Atmospheric circulation and therefore much more complicated so I'm going back to my text books! :)

overlordchuck
03-21-2009, 09:16 AM
Very, very fancy.

Korba
03-22-2009, 01:33 PM
Thanks chuck.

Just about got my head around the next section.

The heat concentrated heat at the equator means hot air rises and sinks at the 30 degree mark, this is called the Hadley Cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadley_cell).

The Polar Cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_vortex) carries the (relatively) warm and moist air from the 60 degree region to the poles where is sinks as it cools.

The final mixing zone between 30 and 60 degrees is more complicated. The Ferrel Cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_circulation) relies on the air movements on the two other cells rather than solar radiation and as a result the weather here is much more unstable (as anyone British should be familiar with!).

This means the worlds air pressure maps looks as follows:

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This air pressure is very important to the map because it will influence the wind directions on the map and the rainfall.

Winds travels from high pressure areas to low pressure areas. Coriolis Force (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect) means winds in the northern hemisphere bend to the right and to the left in the southern hemisphere. This means the predominant air flows of the world are:

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Even more important are the effects of pressure on rainfall. In very general (and simplified terms) low pressure areas have higher rainfall because the air is cooling and sinking. In high pressure areas the air is rising and generally rainfall is lower. The exception to the rule is the Equator where the air converges from the north and south and is characterized by heavy rainfall.

Looking at a World Climate Map (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ClimateMapWorld.png) you can see the 30 degree latitudes contain the worlds major deserts.

So for my world the following maps shows the wet and arid areas:

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All of the information so far hasn't been affected by any of my map features. The next stage is to add the effect of mountain ranges on atmospheric circulation and therefore rainfall and try to add simple ocean currents that will add a bit of randomness to the (eventual) climate type.

Korba
03-23-2009, 08:53 AM
Things start to get a bit more interesting now (and colorful).

The next task is to add the effect of the major mountain chains on rainfall. As the wind blows and encounters a mountain range it rises cools and any moisture falls as rain. on the other side of the mountains a rain shadow forms because all of the moisture from the air has already fallen.

So using the prevailing wind directions shown previously the rainfall map can be modified to show areas that would be drier than expected and wetter than expected (the black lines represent the mountain chains):

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Next stage is ocean currents. A bit of a dark art this one so I'm going to stick with the basic rules and fly by the seat of my pants. Been a while since i did any oceanography so if anyone in the know sees any glaring errors please let me know.

The first rule is warm water flows from the equator to the poles and vice versa. The ocean currents are affected by Coriolis Force and so bend to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the south. Obviously the shape of the land will affect flow so using these basic rules my worlds ocean currents look as below:

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Ocean currents are very important at distributing heat so i can modify the earlier heat map as the ocean currents shown above carry warm water to the poles and as cold water returns. This gives an ocean temperature map as below:

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Although its unlikely a fantasy map will never show ocean temperature this is very important on later land types. For example the warm ocean current flowing past the northern island arc means they will be much warmer than the latitude itself would suggest. The ocean also acts as a thermal blanket keeping costal areas milder while inland regions cool much faster. So using this and the ocean temperatures i have spread the effects onto the land to give the land average land temperature map:

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Just for the sakes of a pretty map i combined the two temperature maps:

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So now we have all the essential data i need to do the map. The next stage is producing a climate map showing how the tundra, desert, rain forest etc will be positioned.

Karro
03-23-2009, 12:50 PM
Bravo, bravo. I love the step-by-step logical world-building approach. I attempted to do this on my own map, but my own understanding of these facts was much to feeble to reach quite the level you are going to. In particular, I missed the consideration of how oceanic currents affect overall climate and temperature.

You're efforts are certainly commendable!

Korba
03-25-2009, 03:45 PM
Thanks Karro :)

I need to define the landscape now based on temperature and rainfall. I'm going to use the Köppen climate classification (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%B6ppen_climate_classification). The five major climate classifications are:


A - Moist Tropical Climates are known for their high temperatures year round and for their large amount of year round rain.

B - Dry Climates are characterized by little rain and a huge daily temperature range.

C - In Humid Middle Latitude Climates land/water differences play a large part. These climates have warm,dry summers and cool, wet winters.

D - Continental Climates can be found in the interior regions of large land masses. Total precipitation is not very high and seasonal temperatures vary widely.

E - Cold Climates describe this climate type perfectly. These climates are part of areas where permanent ice and tundra are always present. Only about four months of the year have above freezing temperatures.

From - http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/climate.htm

On my map this gives:

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The Wikki entry has a full set of climate types. I will use the sub groups when i map in more detail but for the moment i will be working on the following general guidelines:

A - Tropical Rainforest
B - Desert
C - 1 - Mediterranean
2 - Temperate Forest
D - 1 - Grassland
2 - Boreal Forest
E - Polar Ice and tundra

type 1 climates are from 0 - 30 degrees and type 2 60 - 90 degrees.

Of course these are very basic but allow me to map the background terrain of any area and then add in local climate effects and human influence more realistically.

The next stage is to actually try and make some pretty maps, but I'm happy that unlike all the previous maps i have tried to make i won't have to spend hours worrying about what the air and ocean currents, latitude and prevailing wind are doing.

Korba
03-31-2009, 08:03 AM
I have a had a little bit of time to start on one of the maps in more detail. I'm choosing the centre southern continent. It is about 550 miles East to West and 400 miles North to South making it similar in size to France.

As you can see from the previous map the northern area is desert similar to North Africa and then down to A Scandinavian climate in the South. The range of temperatures is large because my southern area doesn't have the Gulf Stream equivalent keeping it artificially warmer. So far i have only added the drainage pattern. I have put quite a bit of thought into this:

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The higher the number of rivers is obviously related to the amount of rain in the area. The shape of the rivers is related the the hills and mountains in the area (which will be clearer when i add them!)

Next stage is to add the mountains but I'm still deciding on the style of map to try.

overlordchuck
03-31-2009, 11:53 AM
Looks great as of yet, though obviously you'll need to remake that coastline to be less pixely. I don't remember if I've repped you or not for this post already. But who cares, have some anyway!

Karro
03-31-2009, 11:58 AM
I have a had a little bit of time to start on one of the maps in more detail. I'm choosing the centre southern continent. It is about 550 miles East to West and 400 miles North to South making it similar in size to France.



So, based on this, does this mean your planet is considerably smaller than Earth?

I ask because, given the size of your continent (which appears to stretch from the 30th to 60th parallels), if this planet were the same size as Earth, then this continent would appear to be much larger than France (which is about 211 sq. miles vs. 220 sq. miles roughly for this continent by your figures).

By my admittedly rough calculation, if your continent is about 550 miles across, then the circumference of your planet at the 60th parallel is somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 miles (based on my very rough finger-ruler measure of the number of times you can count the width of this continent across the 60th parallel). Mathematically, the circumference at the 60th parallel is 1/2 of the circumference of the planet at the equator, which gives you a planetary circumference of between 6,000 and 8,000 miles. The Earth, on the other hand, has a circumference of almost 25,000 miles.

Korba
03-31-2009, 02:22 PM
Thanks Chuck.

Thanks for pointing the scale problem out Karro, i was out by a factor of 10 :oops: The continent should be 5300 miles east to west and 3500 north to south so its more like the size of the US and Canada (very roughly).

Its the first time i have worked at such a large scale so I'm going to have to do some rethinking because as much as i like my drainage pattern I'm currently working at 3.5 miles per pixel.

The sizes (in miles) each continent are below, the image is 2500 by 1250 pixels. The circumference of the earth is roughly 25'000 miles so hopefully my measurements are right this time.

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Back to the drawing board :)

Karro
03-31-2009, 02:56 PM
Thanks Chuck.

Thanks for pointing the scale problem out Karro, i was out by a factor of 10 :oops: The continent should be 5300 miles east to west and 3500 north to south so its more like the size of the US and Canada (very roughly).

Its the first time i have worked at such a large scale so I'm going to have to do some rethinking because as much as i like my drainage pattern I'm currently working at 3.5 miles per pixel.

The sizes (in miles) each continent are below, the image is 2500 by 1250 pixels. The circumference of the earth is roughly 25'000 miles so hopefully my measurements are right this time.



You're welcome. It just felt wrong, scale-wise, so I had to dig into the figures, out of sheer curiosity, and then felt compelled to share my discovery.

And I had the 25,000 mile figure sitting in front of me when I wrote my response, and yet still wrote 220,000 when citing the earth's circumference. Of course, that's what I meant (I had just looked it up, and found the figure 24,901.55 miles or 40,075.16 km for the circumference).

Korba
03-31-2009, 04:45 PM
Well the help earns my rep so thanks :)

Seeing as i'm stuck with scale problems i'm going to carry on in the style i did in my post Test map of Otajom (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=4433). The hand drawn style i have been using for longest means i can ignore scale for the time being and leave the realism behind.

I have added the relief that influenced my drainage pattern. The mountains run in parallel (ish) lines reflecting the buckling that is usually seen in mountain building regions. I have tried to scale the mountains slightly to reflect the active mountain building at the plate margin, the syncline (buckle) mountains to the north and south and then the smaller mountain range running north west that is a relic mountain range when the island to the north east and this one were joined.

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If anyone has any tips how i can represent grassland (think Mongolia), Mediterranean climate, Boreal forest and tundra in a handrawn style i would really appreciate it.

Korba

Steel General
03-31-2009, 07:31 PM
You might look at some examples of the CC3 symbols for those types of terrain to get some inspiration.

RobA
03-31-2009, 09:24 PM
Two I have worked with (iso sketched) are here:

http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=1990&highlight=ascadia&page=4

(with a big discussion on depicting forest on page 3)

and:
http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=2423&highlight=ascadia&page=6

-Rob A>

Naeddyr
04-01-2009, 02:09 AM
Looks very nice.

Hrm. For grasslands, maybe small tufts of grass every now and then, with long, low hills (Mongolia isn't all flat). Fir shaped trees for northern climates, which can be dithered with lollipop style trees where they overlap.

Korba
04-02-2009, 03:30 PM
Thanks for the suggestions and links :)

I have made a very rough pattern for the two forest types, added some dunes, some grassland and some swamp. Nothing is final yet but i'm just trying things out and building it up so it looks a bit of a mess at the moment i'm afraid.

11993

Naeddyr
04-02-2009, 04:23 PM
Are you going to adjust the borders of those trees? The pattern clipping there bugs me. Some dodge brushing to burn off the gray bits, and then just paint pure white to adjust the outlines... yeeeees. And then we could draw a small compass here, maybe a small navy to fill up the sea here, an army here. Conscripts from every city flowing into our irregulars, an army so huge it lends legitimacy to itself through might-is-right, under our command! Yes! Then, as I stand before them, and lift my hand, a hundred thousand boots will stomp down in unison, and the armies of Conquest will roll out and cover the world under its feet!

oh and one of your rivers is tapered assbackwards

Korba
04-03-2009, 10:08 AM
Are you going to adjust the borders of those trees? The pattern clipping there bugs me.

Yes definitely, but at this stage making a quick pattern lets me see how things are coming along. I'm going to be redrawing the mountains so I'm not finalising things yet, hence the warning its a bit of a mess at the moment :)


oh and one of your rivers is tapered assbackwards

Really? Can you point out where please because i can't spot it.

Korba

Naeddyr
04-03-2009, 11:34 AM
The small twice-brancher in the southwest corner, and a couple of river branches in the two rivers to the west from that one.

Korba
04-05-2009, 04:10 PM
The small twice-brancher in the southwest corner, and a couple of river branches in the two rivers to the west from that one.

Thanks for that :)

I have redone the rivers so they taper properly and have redrawn the mountains. I'm part way through shading them. The North West line are how the rest should look when I'm finished. Hopefully there is enough variety in the shape and shadows this time.

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Girltron
04-06-2009, 11:27 AM
Wow, this stuff is brilliant. You’ve given me lots to think about in my own attempt. Hope you carry on adding to this thread!

I’m noticing one thing about coastline; I think that technique for generating random coastline would work better for smaller geographic areas. The larger the continent, the lesser the variations are to my eye, producing very blocky continents. Maybe a similar technique using different tools could be applied first, to get large outlines of continental areas, then the coastal areas could be refined by the current method.

In terms of routing rivers, did you use any specific functions or did you just sketch them freely based on educated guesses?

Korba
04-06-2009, 03:52 PM
Thank you Girltron.

This is my first world map and scale has been an issue for me. Only having done regional type maps before this is a learning process for me as i go. Looking back i would have changed my coastal outlines but there is no way I'm doing that tectonics again for a while so they stay :)

Latest progress, rivers tweaked and the mountains are finished (crosses fingers).

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Next to come is the forests, i think i have some ideas how I'm going to do them to represent boreal -> deciduous -> semi arid -> scrub

overlordchuck
04-07-2009, 12:13 AM
I applaud your work so far. The only thing that irks me is that the rivers are darker than the coastline, which should probably be retraced anyway to get some details on the little islands. Anyways, I've been following this thread since the beginning, and I'm really looking forward to future developments.

Karro
04-07-2009, 09:42 AM
I applaud your work so far. The only thing that irks me is that the rivers are darker than the coastline, which should probably be retraced anyway to get some details on the little islands. Anyways, I've been following this thread since the beginning, and I'm really looking forward to future developments.

I have to agree about the lightness of the coastline and add that overall the map is a little light to me. It shouldn't be too difficult to darken up your lines a tad, unless there's a reason why you have them so light.

Korba
11-08-2011, 06:14 PM
Shockingly it's been over two years since my last update. Life has been very hectic but this project was never totally forgotten. Unfortunately I have lost all my original files but I'm not going through all that climate work again ;)

So, comments about the dark coastline taken into account, I have pretty much traced the coast and river outlines and will be starting again with the other stuff which I was never totally happy with anyway.

Hopefully the next update will be a bit quicker!

39790

Korba
11-11-2011, 06:16 AM
Another restart. I think I must have been working at a much larger scale and then reducing for posts here. So back into Photoshop.

I have made a start on the rivers, a tiny section of forest and marked the main terrain types. I'm going to leave shading and colouring until much later I think.

Once again one of Ascension's maps is providing the inspiration, this time the early stages of Regional Practise (http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?13962-Regional-practice).

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Korba

ravells
11-11-2011, 06:27 AM
That's looking really sweet. I like the rivers.

Lukc
11-11-2011, 11:25 AM
I'd just point out that you need some really weird microclimate effects to have tundras both in the north and south of your region and that a cold desert in the far northeast, north of the tundra region, is also going to need an explanation. :)

Korba
11-13-2011, 11:02 AM
Thanks ravells. :)


I'd just point out that you need some really weird microclimate effects to have tundras both in the north and south of your region and that a cold desert in the far northeast, north of the tundra region, is also going to need an explanation. :)

Thanks for your comment Lukc. It was worth making me look at the climate maps again. Detail for the whole "world" is pretty well covered on the first couple of pages but it was a little tricky to see the detail for the part I'm working on so I agree they should be clearer. I have picked the important details from this part and combined it all onto a single map.

I'm using the Köppen climate classification. The five major climate classifications are:

A - Moist Tropical Climates are known for their high temperatures year round and for their large amount of year round rain. - None on this map
B - Dry Climates are characterized by little rain and a huge daily temperature range. - The North East of the map comes under B although the temperature means it will be more like the steppes than sand dunes.
C - In Humid Middle Latitude Climates land/water differences play a large part. These climates have warm,dry summers and cool, wet winters. - Given the lattitude C will mostly be temperate forest.
D - Continental Climates can be found in the interior regions of large land masses. Total precipitation is not very high and seasonal temperatures vary widely. - Complicated but I have choosen to interprate the either grassland or boreal forest depending on the terrain.
E - Cold Climates describe this climate type perfectly. These climates are part of areas where permanent ice and tundra are always present. Only about four months of the year have above freezing temperatures. - Not much but the extreme south and island chain will be icebound during the winter.
Type 1 climates are from 0 - 30 degrees and type 2 60 - 90 degrees.

As always any comments and pointers gratefully received. Making this map has really refocused my mind on what should be where.

[EDIT] Actually i have enjoyed making this map so much I might go through and try and make a 'pretty' climate map before carrying on with the arty one.

Korba

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Korba
11-15-2011, 01:03 PM
So just for a bit of fun and clearly mark the terrains, I have done a prettier version of the previous map.

Back onto the proper one now!

Korba

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Korba
11-17-2011, 05:57 PM
I have managed to make a bit of progress with the mountains and forest. Seem I made a mistake very early on and the mountain range should be a relic rift valley so thats the currently odd looking thing in the north west of the map.

Korba

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Diamond
11-17-2011, 09:41 PM
This is looking pretty nifty. For some reason, the tilted lat/long lines really make it pop.

Korba
11-21-2011, 05:50 PM
This is looking pretty nifty. For some reason, the tilted lat/long lines really make it pop.

Cheers Diamond :)

Been doing a bit of work on the forest, rift and mountains. I can't quite get the rift to sit right in the terrain though. If anyone could point me towards an example I would be very grateful.

Need to extend the mountain range and work on tundra, grassland and swamp effects now.

Korba

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Korba
02-05-2014, 09:14 AM
After much lurking (and slacking!) I'm going to make yet another attempt to progress with this map. However in a slight change of direction I'm going to follow the excellent tutorial posted by Tear (http://www.cartographersguild.com/tutorials-how/8086-%5Baward-winner%5D-saderan-%96-tutorial.html). I have a had a very quick follow through and think it's a style that fits the map well and might even let me get some of it finished! WIP's to come soon.

Korba

Korba
02-05-2014, 12:39 PM
Coast and ocean progressing :)

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Jalyha
02-05-2014, 12:49 PM
I like that color choice :)

It's REALLY bright around the land, though... maybe will not be as bad with the land filled in, but atm it hurts my eyes D:

Korba
02-05-2014, 05:17 PM
I like that color choice :)

It's REALLY bright around the land, though... maybe will not be as bad with the land filled in, but atm it hurts my eyes D:

Thanks and interesting about the colors, on my screen it's muted and not bright, anyone else think it's over bright? (I did run a monitor calibration to check)

I have added some mountains / hills as an experiment. I like their style but not the positions but a pleasing first attempt, and one river also as a test.

Korba

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Jalyha
02-05-2014, 06:42 PM
Actually, adding the land fixed it... must have been the white that was making it so bright..

It's still kind of glow-y :P

(Does anyone else see this or just me???)

Sometimes I see things funny :/


Anyway I like your mountains! :)

Korba
02-06-2014, 09:38 AM
Thanks Jalyha, glad it doesn't look so bright now.

Redone the mountains and changed the base color to match my climate map, also added rivers back in. Much happier how it's looking this time :)

Korba

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Caenwyr
02-06-2014, 12:08 PM
concerning your climates: keep in mind that mountains tend to block influx and outflow of heat, moisture etc. Two regions on the same latitude on different sides of a mountain range can (and often do) have very different climates. Climate zones tend to gradually flow into one another when the terrain permits it, and have sharp borders when there's mountain ridges involved.

If I read your map correctly, the southern regions are covered in snow. I don't think the climate would get any warmer as you move North, since the mountains should normally block any heat from pouring in. Both southwestern valleys would be Arctic throughout, even their northern tips.

Same goes for water, by the way: the narrower of those valleys is landlocked on 3 sides, and the southern sea seems to cold for much evapotranspiration. The river in that valley should therefore be far smaller than it is now, or disappear altogether.

That said, I must say I love the general shape of your continent, and your colour scheme is pretty awesome too!

Caenwyr
02-06-2014, 12:15 PM
Also, mountain ranges are seldom perpendicular to the coast. At least, there are very few examples of that in the real world. And those that do, usually shape the coastline in the form of lovely pointy extrusions ( think Kamchatka). Those two parallel mountain ranges in the northwest end in bays, and that's very, very peculiar indeed.

Jalyha
02-06-2014, 12:16 PM
Uh... huh?

This is where I get confused... wouldn't the mountains on 3 sides form like... a bowl shape, and catch the rainfall in the center? The rain falls from the sky *above* the mountains, right? So it should fall equally on any side? Someone tried to explain that once, but I didn't get it >.<

Caenwyr
02-06-2014, 12:21 PM
Well simply put rain comes from clouds, which in turn are created when water vapour rises up from the earth's surface (usually the ocean, but some humongous forests are also large enough to create rain). Rain clouds might seem pretty far up to the human eye, but they're hanging far lower than the upper reaches of a mountain range. In order to be able to surpass that obstacle, rain clouds drop the only ballast they have: water. So by the time they reach the other side, they've typically lost all their rain already, and you're left with nothing but dry air. That's why the lands east of the Rocky Mountains are so dry, for example.

Jalyha
02-06-2014, 12:32 PM
Ohhhhhhhhhhh


It makes more sense as ballast :P

So occasional rain, maybe, but never enough to create a mighty river or even a big ole' lake.

??

Caenwyr
02-06-2014, 01:02 PM
Ohhhhhhhhhhh


It makes more sense as ballast :P

So occasional rain, maybe, but never enough to create a mighty river or even a big ole' lake.

??

That's exact!

Korba
02-06-2014, 01:27 PM
Lots of things to reply to :)

Before I do here;'s the latest WIP with vegetation:

61095

Caenwyr:
My mountains are blocking the air current but due to the size of the continent its actually covering over 30 degrees, as a result the South has a low pressure, cold and wet climate with winds from the South East. The North is high pressure, warm and dry with North Westerly winds.

I agree the bottom valleys are are arctic (I had subarctic). The land color and trees are supposed to represent the steppe climate and boreal forest of Northern Siberia. Rain for the rivers would come from glacier / snow melt. I will remove some of the smaller tributaries to try and show better all the water is coming from the rivers and not picking up any more once it leaves the mountains.

There are different types of mountain on the map. The main u shaped mountain range follows the plate margin, the island chains are continuations of the range, I agree a big headland would be better, I might change that :) The other mountain ranges are relics of earlier tectonics (hence the rift valley) or caused by stress folds from the main mountain building (like the Downs in SE England formed as the Alps got 'pushed up')

I'm sure I made mistakes in all my initial climate sketch outs but I think the climate is plausible, it's the colors could improve the clarity I'm sure.

Thanks for the comments though.

Korba

Korba
02-10-2014, 05:54 AM
Done some tidying on textures and added some ice, rivers should better reflect their origin / climate.

Very pleased so far, not quite sure what to do next without starting over on the land shape.

Korba

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