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Duvik
07-24-2007, 11:44 PM
Creating a quick and easy dungeon floorplan ((View this thread for a work in progress with images that illustrate this method http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?p=5763#post5763 ))

This quick tutorial will show you how to create a quick and easy dungeon floorplan. I'll be using and referencing photoshop but, the technique should work just fine in Gimp.

Step 1: Decide on your overall map and grid size and open your file. I'll be using a 45px grid on a 20x20 square map. ((900x900 px for image dimensions))

see the Grid Tutorial for making a transparent grid layer

Step 2: Create a new layer. fill it with your grid pattern, and reduce it's opacity to about 10-20%... just enough to see it while you draw your floorplan.

Step 3: Create a layer 'under' the grid layer and name it 'floor'

Step 4: On your 'floor' layer, you have a few options for drawing but... for beginner's, we're going to use the rectangular Marquee selection tool (see Appendix 1 for method to draw natural looking cave systems). Using this tool, start drawing your rooms and connect them with hallways and corridors. The gridlines will serve as an easy guide for judging measurements and placing doors.

Step 5: Once you have your floors shape all filled in... use the magic wand tool and select the entire floor.

Step 6: Set your brush size to 5px and a hard stroke.

Step 7: Create a new layer, name this one 'walls'

Step 8: On your walls layer, choose the marquee tool again, your previous selection of the floor layer should still be visible. Right click the image and select, Stroke (position: outside)

You now have a nice wall surrounding your floor

Step 8: Switch focus to the 'floors' layer and then use your magic wand again. This time, once you select the floor area, right click the image and choose, 'Select Inverse' This will select everything 'outside' of the floor.

Step 9: Switch to the Grid layer and click the ol' Cntrl-X... this will erase all the grid lines that are outside the floor and allow you to add texture, title, map key, or whatever you wish on the external area of the map.

Step 10: Switch back to the 'floor' layer and apply a nice texture to it... stone, marble, whatever you wish. If you want to add different textures to separate rooms... you'll need select each room area on that layer and 'Layer via Cut/Copy' to another layer.

Step 11: Here's where it'll start to look nice... Give the wall a bit of drop shadow, bevel, and texture. Play with the settings a bit and find a style you like.

Step 12: Create a new layer and name it 'doors'

Step 13: Draw yerself a little door symbol that is one grid space wide and about a 1/5th grid space wide or so. Play with the bevel and emboss, texture, and color until you get the look of whatever sort of door you are placing in that area.

Step 14: Copy the door you make and paste it where ever you need using new layers for each door, and eventually merging all doors to one layer.

Step 15: Optional -- you can play with drop shadows and strokes on the grid layer to achieve some nice grout lines on tile that double as grid markers. Also try changing color of grid and transparency... some folk like saving maps with grids, some don't... If you just wan't groutlines for tiled floors to match up, you can always just cut out the room area from the grid layer and tweak it or hide it for each section.

You should now have a passable looking map for use in your online or tabletop games. There are a lot of neat effects you can add to a map like this.

Appendix 1: Alternate method for creating winding caverns... instead of using the Marquee tool to draw your lines, just freehand them with brush tool... ends up coming out very natural looking.

Appendix 2: Adding flavor... building furniture and rugs and such is beyond scope of this tutorial. I will add a nice trick for lighting effects at a future date I hope.

no time for images now... please post your experiments using this method if you try it out. I'd like to see how well i convey my thoughts

on second thought, here are some finished images at least. I created these three maps using this method.

please note that some of them aren't perfect and doors don't align with grids on one or two whilse the grids extend over walls a bit in another... these were my learning maps... fergive me

http://www.thetangledweb.net/home/images/rsgallery/original/temple1.jpg
http://www.thetangledweb.net/home/images/rsgallery/original/shmoes.jpg
http://www.thetangledweb.net/home/images/rsgallery/original/belzebubs.jpg
http://www.thetangledweb.net/home/images/rsgallery/original/pentMaze.jpg

kalmarjan
07-25-2007, 01:02 AM
Good progress overall! A few comments if I may:

Watch the drop shadows. I am not sure which program you used, but sometimes your shadows make the walls look like they are floating over the ground. This can be fixed by adjusting the placement of the drop shadow. In photoshop it is the distance and the spread markers that will fix this for you.
In the first map, the spot marked 1 looks as if your dias goes beyond the walls. If that is the look you are after, disregard this comment. Otherwise, if you place the dias layer(s) below the wall layer, it will take care of this problem.
The altar needs some loving as well. With the shadows you have, it sort of looks like it is floating.
THe spot marked 2 on the second map presents a little problem. Again, it is interpretation of the map, but logic states that if this is a dungeon, the pillars in the middle of the dungeon would be as tall as the wall, so the drop shadow would/should match the wall's. Otherwise, it appears that there is no ceiling in this dungeon. Also, the spread of the drop shadow needs to be fixed (see the first list item above.
The spot marked 3 on the second map is another interpretation. Again, this probably goes towards layering, but if the pillar does actually glow, the corners of the walls in this area would have no shadows. See, that is the problem sometimes with using layer effects, they just do not work. Try this: Make a new layer above the walls, then press ctrl+alt+g. This will clip the layer to the walls. Fill this with 50% gray, then set the opacity mode to soft light. Then use the dodge and burn brushes to make your shadows. A soft brush will do the trick

All in all, a good tut. A few minor points, and you are on your way to mapping masterdom!

Sandeman

pyrandon
07-25-2007, 01:46 AM
Duvik! You rock! Thanks so much for this--especially since it's on subterranean mapping (which is for some reason only lightly treated in our forum).

If you ever feel reallly crazy, you may want to add some "in process" shots to your tutorial, too, for those of us who are more visual.

Thank you so much for posting this!

PS: in your thread title make sure to specify the program your tutorial utilizes, too, ok? Makes easier surfing/searching.

RPMiller
07-25-2007, 01:59 AM
PS: in your thread title make sure to specify the program your tutorial utilizes, too, ok? Makes easier surfing/searching.
You know I really like what a couple people do on the Dundjinni forums. At the bottom of the post they type several related words that helps when doing searches. Now that we are starting to get up there post count wise, maybe we should do something similar as a standard for Informative and Tutorial posts.

Torq
07-25-2007, 10:52 AM
Great Tut Duvik.

Arcana, when can he have a competition creating this sort of map? It seems that the number of VT heads is growing on the forum (:


Torq

Duvik
07-25-2007, 10:20 PM
Heh, glad you all think it's useful and take heed of the suggestions made by Kalmarjan... they are all well deserved and... my only excuse for those errors is...

These maps were created over a year ago as I practiced the the techniques I had been pieceing together from around the net. I've gotten a little more skilled and pay more attention to the little details. Here's a screen shot of another more recent map I am working on that uses this technique...

((note... i still need work on torches and doors but, you can see a lot of improvemnents over those first maps i posted.)) The attached map is of small scale and was designed for the following event... The Kobold's Key (http://www.thetangledweb.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2241)

RPMiller
07-25-2007, 10:33 PM
Where did you find those beds? I'm looking for such a bed right now actually.

Duvik
07-25-2007, 10:49 PM
homemade, i can post a copy of just the beds if ya wish, won't be til tomorrow though, I'm off to bed... started a new job today and got knowledge overload...

Duvik
07-25-2007, 10:52 PM
nevermind, if yer looking now... i know how it is... here's the bed as a png... you'll have to clear drop shadow yerself though,,, i had merged the layers for bed...

RPMiller
07-25-2007, 11:33 PM
Thanks! If you happen to have the original or remember how you made it that would be even better. I'll make do with this one for now. ;) :D

Duvik
08-01-2007, 04:18 PM
just a quick note on how i made the bed...

it consists of 4 layers:

1: bottom layer, transparent

2: bedpost layer ((just make four circles of similar size after you draw the mattress and space them at edges... color them a light brown and then use layer effects to give them bevel and texture))

3: Mattress layer ((simply use the Rounded Box tool to draw the shape and color the sheets whatever color you want and then play with various Satin settings until it looks like sheets are ruffled a bit))

4: Pillow Layer ((another Rounded Box that is colorized and satinized))

Once you have created all the above layers and objects... and you have a good looking bed made up, you just merge all the layers that make up the bed and apply a drop shadow. Make sure you set your background to transparent before saving. ((I usually keep a dark BG while drawing and then just hide the BG layer before saving. Oh yeah, save it as a png or gif else the transparency won't apply. ((png preferably, gifs suck at rendering drop shadows))

RPMiller
08-01-2007, 04:27 PM
I actually avoid merging layers as much as possible to make future editing easier. For example, what I would change with your directions above is after step 3 I would use the selection tool to select the transparent layer but use all layers. This would give me the outline of the bed including posts. I would then invert the selection, create a new layer and then fill it with whatever color. I would then use that layer to create the drop shadow and move it to the bottom. This would also give a nice appearance of height to the bed.

I always forget about that Satin Filter's usefulness. I really need to use that more often me thinks. Thanks for the step by step on the bed! I'll rep you when I can do it again.

Duvik
08-01-2007, 10:15 PM
Well, I should have said that I usually save the psd, then merge the layers, then add the drop shadow, then just move the finished bed to the map in question.

The problem i find with this method is... sometimes I forget to f12 revert the image back to its saved state before closing and... I'll accidentally select 'yes' when asked if i want to save the file with changes. I've ruined a few projects like that.


I would use the selection tool to select the transparent layer but use all layers.

If i knew how to do that... it'd prob save me many headaches. How do I make it 'use all layers' when on the transparent layer?

RPMiller
08-01-2007, 10:49 PM
If i knew how to do that... it'd prob save me many headaches. How do I make it 'use all layers' when on the transparent layer?
See the highlighted area:

Duvik
08-04-2007, 12:44 AM
ah yes... it's the simple things that just plain elude me sometimes... :facepalms:

I'm creating a map using techniques from this tutorial and will be editing the original post to direct folk to the WIP I have.

RobA
08-08-2007, 04:53 PM
Hi-

I quickly followed the tutorial using GIMP. Attached is the result.

Here is a markup of the steps with the GIMP changes in bold:

Step 1: Decide on your overall map and grid size and open your file. I'll be using a 45px grid on a 20x20 square map. ((900x900 px for image dimensions))

see the Grid Tutorial for making a transparent grid layer
(filter->render->pattern->grid)
Optional: turn on grid snap (view->snap togrid) and set grid to 45px as well (edit->preferences->default grid) This seems to have to be done before creating the image(?)

Step 2: Create a new layer. fill it with your grid pattern, and reduce it's opacity to about 10-20%... just enough to see it while you draw your floorplan.

Step 3: Create a layer 'under' the grid layer and name it 'floor'

Step 4: On your 'floor' layer, you have a few options for drawing but... for beginner's, we're going to use the rectangular Marquee selection tool (see Appendix 1 for method to draw natural looking cave systems). Using this tool, start drawing your rooms and connect them with hallways and corridors. The gridlines will serve as an easy guide for judging measurements and placing doors.

Either select the whole floor area at one go, using shift and alt to add or subtract from the selection, then fill the whole thing with a nice grey, OR fill each selection at a time and build it up that way. PS fill with foreground shortcut is ctrl-,

Step 5: Once you have your floors shape all filled in... use the magic wand fuzzy select tool and select the entire floor. Or right click on the layer icon and select “Alpha to selection”

Step 6: Set your brush size to 5px and a hard stroke.
Don’t bother with this as it is taken care of in the new step 8

Step 7: Create a new layer, name this one 'walls'

Step 8: On your walls layer, choose the marquee tool again, your previous selection of the floor layer should still be visible. Right click the image and select, Stroke (position: outside)
Edit->Stroke Selection. Expand the line style, and set it to 10 px, square cap, miter join, antialiasing on, then click Stroke. Now Edit->Clear the selection. This leaves you with a 5 px stroke outside the selection.

You now have a nice wall surrounding your floor

Step 8: Switch focus to the 'floors' layer and then use your magic wand again. Or right click on the layer icon and select “Alpha to selection” This time, once you select the floor area, right click the image and choose, 'Select Inverse Invert' This will select everything 'outside' of the floor.

Step 9: Switch to the Grid layer and click the ol' Cntrl-X... this will erase all the grid lines that are outside the floor and allow you to add texture, title, map key, or whatever you wish on the external area of the map.

Step 10: Switch back to the 'floor' layer and apply a nice texture to it... stone, marble, whatever you wish. If you want to add different textures to separate rooms... you'll need select each room area on that layer and 'Layer via Cut/Copy' to another layer.
TIP: Check the Lock Alpha Channel check in the layer palette. This will allow you to fill, paint, apply filters, distorts, etc. and not fill the empty areas.

Step 11: Here's where it'll start to look nice... Give the wall a bit of drop shadow, bevel, and texture. Play with the settings a bit and find a style you like.

Here’s where GIMP’s lack of layer effects makes things tricky. These techniques are whole tutorial in themselves…Google search for the Layer Effects Script-fu which automates some similar functions to the photoshop layer effects.

Step 12: Create a new layer and name it 'doors'

Step 13: Draw yerself a little door symbol that is one grid space wide and about a 1/5th grid space wide or so. Play with the bevel and emboss, texture, and color until you get the look of whatever sort of door you are placing in that area.

Step 14: Copy the door you make and paste it where ever you need using new layers for each door, and eventually merging all doors to one layer.

Step 15: Optional -- you can play with drop shadows and strokes on the grid layer to achieve some nice grout lines on tile that double as grid markers. Also try changing color of grid and transparency... some folk like saving maps with grids, some don't... If you just wan't groutlines for tiled floors to match up, you can always just cut out the room area from the grid layer and tweak it or hide it for each section.

pyrandon
08-08-2007, 06:19 PM
Rob, that is an awesomely useful post. GIMP users everywhere rejoice!

Duvik
08-08-2007, 07:20 PM
Whoo hoo!!! Thanks for taking the effort mate!!! Don't ya love how the walls just spring to life from nowhere?

For the record... I can't claim to have developed this technique... i just took the time to type it up for you all. I was inspired by the maps from this site...

http://www.enworld.org/CrookedStaffProductions/page17.html

If I recall, Snikle, from Maptools forums, was helping me out as we both admired the maps posted at Crooked Staff.

Anyway... hopefully this thread will help a ton of folk get their games on :D

((If no one's noticed... I be likin' the maps for gaming more than most others))

edit: I also think i realize why my doors always look odd... after looking at Robs doors and how the overlap the walls a bit on each end... i realize that's my prob... i always squat my doors to leave a bit off space on each side... well... you get the idea... once again... it be the simple things that elude me

RobA
08-09-2007, 12:15 PM
Rob, that is an awesomely useful post. GIMP users everywhere rejoice!

No problem! Believe it or not, I actually enjoy trying to duplicate effects in GIMP that are explained for photoshop.

On the side, I've started putting together GIMP versions of these tutorials:

http://www.lyzrdstomp.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=73&Itemid=86

(As I think they are way cool)

-Rob A>

Rynam
08-15-2007, 03:42 PM
I have photoshop CS and I have wanted for a long time to draw out maps with it, but I really don't know how to use everything. I was looking for a video tutorial that had somebody using photoshop to make a dungeon map, cuz every single tutorial i find is for a world overview map. If anybody can put a link up that would be really helpful, I've spent the last week looking a tutorial. If I can get one that shows me how to do everything from beginning to end for a map, then i can make maps and scenario's for my friends and I. Thanks.

Duvik
08-16-2007, 09:53 PM
What exactly is giving you trouble from the first tutorial in this thread? Is it a matter of not recognizing the tools mentioned for each task? I'm curious as I feel it's pretty straight-forward except for the lack of step by step images.

I wanna post some pics up but i've gotten busy over the last couple weeks.

My best recommendation if it is just a matter of not recognizing tools would be to just google each tool that gives you trouble. There a numerous basic PS tutorials out there and most tutorials on precise subjects like map making or image retouching, will assume a basic familiarity with such things as pen tool, lasso selection, and all those other buttons on the toolbar.

You'll find tons of PS basics videos out there for free methinks but... to find one specifically for cartography uses would be a real gem if anyone could find or make one.

Rynam
08-17-2007, 05:22 PM
My apologize, I didn't recognize the first post as a tutorial for photoshop, it only registered as a tutorial for gimp, and im trying not to use those because using those with photoshop can be difficult. I looked at the first one and i am half way through a map as I write this. Thank you for pointing this out. I would also like if people could post links to video tutorials for dungeon making because I learn better through watching and copying than that of reading and doing. Thank you people for all of your help.

Duvik
08-17-2007, 06:32 PM
No prob on the confusion. I should have titled the thread better. Maybe the mods could rename it with Gimp/Photoshop included in title. Please post an image of what you manage to come up with in this thread too if ye don't mind.