PDA

View Full Version : Atlas style test



Majortopio
12-20-2009, 07:58 AM
So I was looking at some atlas maps on the forums here (namely the Torentine map), and decided to take the style for a spin in Illustrator. I'm pleased with the results so far, but I'd like to know how to make the countries have an inner glow; I know where the actual effect is, but I can't figure out how to make it follow the coastlines (if the country has one on its borders) exactly. Any help?
The scale was something I came up with in a few seconds, I don't know if it fits, or is too big or whatever.

Tell me what you think so far otherwise :)

voo
12-20-2009, 08:42 AM
Looks like a great start! Inner glow should work properly as long as all the places you want them are on their own separate layer. I'm not an Illustrator user though, so I'm not sure, but I assume its the same as PS. Good luck with this, it has great potential :)

Ascension
12-20-2009, 10:36 AM
I have no idea how to do it in Illustrator but here's how to do it in Photoshop...I assume it would be similar enough so that you could figure it out.

First I have the land on its own layer. On a new layer I draw a big blob of color that extends out into the ocean while the part on land follows the shape that I want. Ctrl+click on the land layer and select-inverse then hit delete...this deletes the blob out on the ocean so that the blob now has a "country" shape. Ctrl+click on this layer and on the paths tab hit "path from selection". On a new layer you stroke the path and voila, then you can dump the country layer beneath if you like.

Majortopio
12-20-2009, 10:46 AM
I have no idea how to do it in Illustrator but here's how to do it in Photoshop...I assume it would be similar enough so that you could figure it out.

First I have the land on its own layer. On a new layer I draw a big blob of color that extends out into the ocean while the part on land follows the shape that I want. Ctrl+click on the land layer and select-inverse then hit delete...this deletes the blob out on the ocean so that the blob now has a "country" shape. Ctrl+click on this layer and on the paths tab hit "path from selection". On a new layer you stroke the path and voila, then you can dump the country layer beneath if you like.

Yeah, I know how to do it in Photoshop, but Illustrator (frustratingly) has quite a different system, at least as far as I can tell. Selection isn't the same, as it is vector-based. I'll keep experimenting though, thanks for the tips :)

Ascension
12-20-2009, 10:57 AM
I think you can still do path from selection so maybe just stroke the whole continent and then go back and hand-do the inner lines for countries.

Majortopio
12-20-2009, 03:38 PM
I think you can still do path from selection so maybe just stroke the whole continent and then go back and hand-do the inner lines for countries.

Very true. I'll look more into it when I actually get to the coastlines.

So, I decided to take this style and start utilizing it for something more useful than a random map. I'm remaking my 'large overland map' from my other thread into atlas style; to use for more detailed regional maps, as it is all vector and easily scalable. I'm starting to grow fond of Illustrator :P

So far, the best way I've found to symbolize different natural features such as mountains are just colored regions, such as dark brown for large mountains, light brown for smaller ones and highlands, and dark green for forests. I'm thinking that I should just leave grasslands/plains as the default blueish-white color. Suggestions?

Anyways, I'm working on the Lush Expanse in the West as of right now. Most names are probably placeholders, unless I still like them when I'm finished. The scale bar is just the same scale bar from my other map, scaled up to fit the atlas map's size. I decided on 300 km instead of the 250 that is in my other thread; it seems to fit better. But I still need a more educated opinion on the scale.

CC is appreciated, as always :)

RobA
12-21-2009, 09:36 AM
I thought Illustrator had "layer effects" That would just be an inner glow?

In Inkscape I'd create a clone with no fill and a thick blurred line then apply a cloned clipping mask. No idea if any of that applies to Illustrator, tho.

-Rob A>

Majortopio
12-21-2009, 09:47 AM
I thought Illustrator had "layer effects" That would just be an inner glow?

In Inkscape I'd create a clone with no fill and a thick blurred line then apply a cloned clipping mask. No idea if any of that applies to Illustrator, tho.

-Rob A>

Yes, but my problem is making the glow follow the coastline exactly. A clipping mask doesn't work, as the rest of the layer is still there, just hidden. I'm fresh out of ideas :/

Wordman
12-21-2009, 01:23 PM
Assuming you have a "continent" that is made up of "nations", and the nations are closed paths. For any given nation, some of the border is coastline, some is not. If I understand what you are asking, you are wondering how to get an "inner glow" on only part of the nation's closed path.

Answer: you can't.

It turns out, though, that this isn't really what you are trying to do. You are trying to put an inner glow on the coastline.

So, make a coastline path:

Select all the nations on the coast.

Duplicate them in place.

Put them on a new layer (on top of the nation layer).

Lock everything but the new layer.

Take the scissors or knife tool and start cutting the duplicated nation objects apart, separating the "coastline" part of their path from the non-coastline part. Delete all the non-coastline parts.

Now start joining the coastline segments together until you have a single enclosed shape for the coastline of the entire continent.

Apply the inner glow to this new path.

Wordman
12-21-2009, 01:33 PM
Rereading, it looks like you might have the opposite issue of what I described: you have a single coastline object and want to know how to build closed paths for the nations that overlap the coastline.

Do the same thing, sort of in reverse:

Duplicate the coastline in place.

Move the duplicate to a new layer.

Lock everything else.

Assuming you have loose lines that make up your national borders, where these intersect the coastline, use the knife or scissors to cut the coastline.

You will now join this coastline path to the national borders to make a closed path for the nation, then give that path an inner glow.

Important: Each of these loose lines that make up national borders will need to be cloned (and possibly cut), because a line that defines the border between two nations has to be used twice: once for one nation, once for the other. Since a single line can't do that, you need to duplicate the line in place, using one copy for one nation, one for the other.


Note the mental leap that is needed in both of these cases: it is very common in vector drawing for something that looks like one line to actually be several copies of the same line, layered on top of each other.

Another corollary: When doing this kind of work, it is important to get your shapes right at the start. Once you start doing all this line cloning, you really don't want to start editing the path of the line that was cloned.

Majortopio
12-21-2009, 02:17 PM
Rereading, it looks like you might have the opposite issue of what I described: you have a single coastline object and want to know how to build closed paths for the nations that overlap the coastline.

Do the same thing, sort of in reverse:

Duplicate the coastline in place.

Move the duplicate to a new layer.

Lock everything else.

Assuming you have loose lines that make up your national borders, where these intersect the coastline, use the knife or scissors to cut the coastline.

You will now join this coastline path to the national borders to make a closed path for the nation, then give that path an inner glow.

Important: Each of these loose lines that make up national borders will need to be cloned (and possibly cut), because a line that defines the border between two nations has to be used twice: once for one nation, once for the other. Since a single line can't do that, you need to duplicate the line in place, using one copy for one nation, one for the other.


Note the mental leap that is needed in both of these cases: it is very common in vector drawing for something that looks like one line to actually be several copies of the same line, layered on top of each other.

Another corollary: When doing this kind of work, it is important to get your shapes right at the start. Once you start doing all this line cloning, you really don't want to start editing the path of the line that was cloned.

Ah, thank you very much! This is exactly the information I needed :).

a2area
12-21-2009, 03:26 PM
this is basically what Wordman said i'm just repeating it in my own words.. that is, how i do it..

• To divide your landmass into nations you will have to make separate closed shapes and use pathfinder: divide.. i do one at a time or blocks at a time then subdivide those because it gets messy. Everytime you divide overlapping shapes you have leftover parts to be deleted so it is easier to work with fewer at a time.

• Always keep spare outlines of our original objects somewhere cause you'll need them later. So, you make a copy of your continent to be divided... copy it to a new layer and fill it with black then set the opacity to something like 20%. This is so that after you divide it you will be able to see extra overlapping shapes as they will appear darker.

• Draw an object the shape of the new country you want (also 20% opacity black) and hang it over into the ocean. Select the continent shape and the nation shape and then use the pathfinder palette : divide. Now you will have two shapes. Ungroup them and discard overlapping areas. Throw away the areas in the sea as well.

• Now take the portion of the continent that needs to be divided farther and repeat. It's a good idea to put that nation shape that is done onto another layer safe from accidental deletion.

After doing this you can choose your landmass then apply effect: stylize: inner-glow and play around with that... you can set that object or sub-layer to multiply (overlay, normal or whatever) and play around with the opacity to get the desired look. If you want to edit that effect later you can open the "appearance" palette and it will show you what effects are applied to the object selected. You CAN apply effects to entire layers as well.. just try and do one or the other if possible as it can get really confusing with a lot of layers. For instance that torentine map has god-only-knows-how-many layers and i have had some baffling situations where nested effects get very tricky so i try to avoid that.

ALSO.. just FYI.. to define separate countries on that Torentine map i used a duplicate of the outline and gave it a thinner solid stroke of the same color (on the inside of the object which can be controlled in the stroke menu), then turned the opacity down on that object, set it to multiply and put it above the inner glow outline.

Majortopio
12-23-2009, 05:10 PM
Thanks for the detailed walkthrough, a2area - I'll definitely keep it in mind for when I reach the coastlines.

So, a few updates, mostly just the incorporation of more areas, such as the Central Highlands. A few more details in the western Expanse as well. Coming along nicely, so far, I think.

The reason more hasn't been done is because I've also been working on a regional map of the Seven Crowns, which is slightly more detailed than what you see in the larger map. I've done that before I've finished everything else because I want to start writing some background for that place ASAP, because I have a whole lot of ideas at the moment.