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Darakonis
01-05-2010, 12:21 AM
Long-time lurker, first-time poster. This is the first map I've spent a considerable amount of time on, and the first compass rose I've ever made.


A map of the town of Brushmoor, used in my D&D games.

Brushmoor is known regionally as the "Copper Town." Because of its wealth of copper, most of the town's houses have copper roof shingles.

Green oxidation is evidence of poor maintenance of the copper shingles, and households that cannot afford to replace fallen copper shingles resort to wooden shingles.


The terrain was created in Bryce; the town layout was generated in RPG City Map Generator; the rest was done in Photoshop.


Link to full-size, 2600x2600 (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2010/004/7/8/Brushmoor_by_Rhykker.jpg).

Ascension
01-05-2010, 12:31 AM
The houses and walls look really nice, good work there.

Steel General
01-05-2010, 11:07 AM
Good job, this came out quite nicely.

Ramah
01-05-2010, 01:20 PM
Stuck on 3 rep after posting a map like this?

I think it looks really great and you deserve more so here, take what I can give. :)

The houses look very well done. Are they brushes?
The layout seems a little.. random, but the houses and the outer walls etc. look fab.

Locution
01-05-2010, 03:24 PM
This is a great looking map! And I agree with Ramah, you have far too little rep after posting a map like this. Let me make a contribution!

Daelin
01-05-2010, 04:27 PM
This looks great. I like the oxidation-effect on the copper roofs and the drop shadows on the trees. Have some rep!

Trog
01-05-2010, 07:16 PM
Great detail on this map. I really like the water texture. Did you use a brush for the houses on a mask with varied roofing colors on the layer masking it? Whatever you did it turned out well. *reps*

moutarde
01-05-2010, 11:09 PM
I really like it, nice and clean, consider yourself repped :)

torstan
01-05-2010, 11:37 PM
Nice work on the map. Your use of textures is lovely. The one thing that's a little off is the shadows. You've used a drop shadow filter with an offset - which does a great job in most places, but you'll see that the edges of the shadows aren't quite right. It looks like the buildings are floating rather than being connected to the ground, because the shadows don't connect directly to the corners. It's most obvious around the edges of the square and rectangular buildings. The shadows should be cast straight out from the edges of the building, but this isn't happening here.

Hope that helps, because the rest of the map is really great.

Diamond
01-06-2010, 12:37 AM
That's awesome. I think the thing I like the most is the care and attention to detail you took with the river banks. Good job with the realistic sediment build-up on the angles.

Darakonis
01-07-2010, 07:23 PM
Thanks for all the comments!

“The houses look very well done. Are they brushes?”

I wish. I wanted to use a brush, because you can set a brush to randomize scale, rotation, etc. but I realized that brushes don’t preserve color :(

The other issue with brushes is that they wouldn’t know which side of the roof to shade with respect to the west-south-west light source.

So each house is actually its own Group in Photoshop, consisting of a chimney layer and a roof layer, each with their own drop shadows (so that both drop shadows would point in the proper direction). Copy, paste, scale, rotate. Repeat ~200 times.


“The layout seems a little.. random,”

Heh yeah; I guess that’s what happens when you use a random town generator. I don’t know why I wanted to remain so faithful to the randomly generated layout – I guess next time I’ll try to put some thought into layout. Any tips on that are welcome (do you just mean aligning the houses with the roads? Or do you also mean the layout of the entire city plan?)


“Did you use a brush for the houses on a mask with varied roofing colors on the layer masking it?”

I didn’t use a brush for the houses for the aforementioned reasons, but you’re about correct about the roofing colors. The base house “template” I used had a wooden roof color. I applied a mask over that with the copper color, using a posterized cloud filter to make the copper distribution uneven. Then I overlaid the oxidized copper color in a separate mask in a similar fashion. I played around with both masks so that one area looked more rich and well-maintained, and another looked particularly poor (probably not clearly visible).


“The one thing that's a little off is the shadows.”

Agreed. I saw the problem, but didn’t know how to fix it short of manually drawing in the shadows for all ~200 buildings. I wish Photoshop had a filter that would automatically “tie” drop shadows to the figure that casts the shadow.

If you, or anyone else, know a way of accomplishing this, I would be very appreciative.


“I think the thing I like the most is the care and attention to detail you took with the river banks. Good job with the realistic sediment build-up on the angles.”

Heheh thanks. Finally some use came out of that Geology degree I have! I’m glad someone noticed those point bars and cut banks :)