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Thread: CWBP 2 : Astrophysics

  1. #41
      Jalyha is offline
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    That could still fit though?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azelor View Post
    The main moon orbit the planet in about 28 days and the second moon is slightly faster on the same orbit? The second moon is still in another dimension I hope.
    Yeah still in another dimension sort of, it adds some tension when the second moon risks manifesting too much. Ah... imminent planetary destruction really puts things in perspective.
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  3. #43
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    No, it's lunar destruction we are talking about. It's much less destruction and thus less interesting.
    But what would happen if the two moons hit one another? Both moons get back in their dimension to disintegrate peacefully? Or they collide in the same dimension? Destroy the fabric of the world itself and provoke and even weirder phenomenon?

    Well, I'm asking that question but I don't want it to happen. So it does not need to have a solid explanation. One could say: ''when I see that the moons are about to collide, I just close my TV and do something else. I try to convince myself that it's just how things are supposed to be but it's still really annoying to think that we are all going to die... again''. That's what I did in Zelda Majora's mask and I think it's a perfectly legitimate answer.



    For the rest of the system, I will play with my physic simulator to test the brightness of the second star. It's on scale so I'll put a print screen here.

    I said that the orbital period was around 500 years but I have no preference for the orbital eccentricity or the angle of inclination. Ideas?

    AS for the rest of the system, my idea was to have:
    1- planet that orbit close to the star. It is tide locked. I do not know at what distance a planet could become tide locked with the Sun but I suppose the planet would be difficult to see from our world. Maybe at dawn/dusk, a small and reddish sphere would appear in the sky close to the star. It's possible to see her only a very short moment in the best scenario. It's a lava type planet. Being close to the star mean it's a lot hotter with surface temperate well over 100 degrees on the tidal locked face. But the other side is freezing cold. And finally, the tidal energy generate heat in the planets resulting in a lot of geothermal activities. Maybe (would be cool) to have enough tectonic activities that the planet would generate a faint reddish light. The orbit is almost a perfect circle. It's about the size of Mercury.

    2- is an old planet. The formation occurred before the supernova and before the main star was born. She probably drifted for some time in space before gaining the actual orbit. Her obit is pretty eccentric. Temperature on the planet are extreme since the rotation takes about more than 3 terrestrial years to complete and has a strong inclination. The planet has near to zero magnetic field given it's slow rotation and the small size of it's melted core. Is has a very thin atmosphere with different gases and water. During it's life, many objects came in collision with the planet. That's why there are so many craters and water in the atmosphere. There also a lot of debris floating around the planet. Some of them rotates at more than 1 million km but most orbit closer in a planetary ring. The debris are generally small or it's simply dust. The color is a pale gray and she is smaller than Venus. This planet would be visible with naked eyes.

    3- Orbit pretty close to our world and is in the habitable zone too. It's an earth like planet that is 30% bigger and rotate in about 36 hours. The gravity is stronger which allows for a thicker and denser atmosphere. It's a very humid place but extreme climates also exist (but maybe not deserts). The planet is more inclined (30 degrees) so climates are more extreme between the season. It has 2 moons: the second one is pretty small but the closest one is much bigger, bigger than the moon. It's so big that the planet is tidal locked to it.

    4- CWBP 2 world ...

    5- a cold planet smaller than Venus orbit at around 250 millions km of the star. It's almost all covered with a thick layer of ice which reflect a lot of light into space.

    6- a blue gas giant, probably made of methane.

    I haven't sorted all the details
    Last edited by Azelor; 02-20-2014 at 11:26 PM.

  4. #44
      Falconius is offline
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    I can't imagine two moons colliding that close to our world would leave it unscathed. Also lunar collision is pretty exciting and pretty damn interesting. I don't know what would happen if they actually did collide, it's not important, just the tension of the suspense is what I'm looking for. Can make for some interesting stories.

    All three of those planets sound really great.

    My concern is getting like 4 or 5 or 6 observable (with naked eye) planets so we'd still need one more, maybe a couple of gas giants? OR a big Ice planet. Then we can leave any further planets in the system for later or for people to put in on a by need basis.

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    I just edited the message. The gas giant would be blue and cold like Uranus/Neptune. I don't know how far from the star it would be though, 3 AU ? There would still be some room for other planets.

  6. #46
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    Would some sort of super dense planet be possible allowing it to have a very large ring? The idea being that it would be a small planet surrounded by enough stuff that it looked sort of like a dinner plate with a pebble in the middle....

  7. #47
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    Maybe, the planet could be made bigger.


    A couple of pictures (i know light comes from both sides equally as the software does not consider the stars brightness when it comes to light reflexion on planets)

    1- both stars as seen from the first planet that orbit at 2.5 millions km of the main star.
    CWBP 2 : Astrophysics-both.jpg

    2- Planet 3 and main star (more than 3 times the mass of Earth) as seen from CWBP2. I don't know if it's normal but it's the only planet I was able to see. It's about 20 millions km aways. Planet one and two should appear somewhere...
    CWBP 2 : Astrophysics-planet-3.jpg

    3- the old star compared with the moon
    CWBP 2 : Astrophysics-small-moon.jpg

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    Could we include a gas giant orbiting very close to the sun? That could make an interesting feature to the star system if it were large enough to cause visible (partial) eclipses.

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    hmmm idk where to start...

    1) A lunar collision is the secondary plot of my latest novel-in-progress, and the primary plot of the entire series in my head, so I agree with falconius... I think it's VERY interesting.

    2) I think having 2 tidelocked planets in the system could have interesting results, but it would sounds rather uninventive to a lot of readers/players if we don't *do* anything with them. Also, I don't know how likely the chances of that happening.

    I know that the more stuff there is going on in the system, the more ways people can use it, but idk where the outer limit of believability comes in. So far we have a solar system with a star rotating another star with a planetary system containing an earthlike planet that can support life, has 2 moons in different dimensions set up for possible future collision, 2 tidal locked planets, some very large moons, a second planet which just happens to be habitable if the moons do collide (or something else drastic happens nd our CWBP2 project becomes uninhabitabe, and everything is visible with the naked eye from the planet that just happens to support life.

    Still plausible, if explained away properly, but it's really pushing boundaries of believability, i think.

    4. The simulations look plausible though

    5. Regarding a large gas planet near the sun... I tried some real basic calculations, with Jupiter about the distance of venus and kept coming up with impossible answers, so either it's impossible, or my math is really bad. Probably it's my math. Can someone smarter than me test what would happen?

    6. I know this all sounds negative but I actually like nearly everything (I have like 80 gorgeous plot-lines spinning in my head already, lol) Just wanted to clarify I'm not against any of this, just trying to understand how far it can go
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  10. #50
      Falconius is offline
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    I counted only one tidally locked planet, the other tidally locked object there is a moon for planet 3.

    While planet 3 exist in the habitable zone and has weather patterns it is not necessarily supporting any life. The likelihood is not. Either way our population would have no idea whether there was life there or not. (unless we go with the idea of some G nodes leading off world.)

    In Earth there are 5 classical planets that were easily observable with the naked eye. So far I count only 3 or four here, plus one that is very occasionally observable (planet 1).

    We aren't even scratching the surface of our made up system when you consider our Earthly solar system has 8-9 planets that we know about, an asteroid belt, at least one protoplanet. Pluto is possibly a binary system with one of its "moons". And plenty of comets zipping in and out on strange orbits. I'd say given that all this cool stuff is really happening in our one actual solar system, having a really fun made up solar system isn't as half as strange as reality.

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