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Thread: Procedural mapping style experiments

  1. #11
      su_liam is offline
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    For the faded look, you might add a white layer below your artwork and then reduce the opacity of your artwork till it looks properly faded. That's in photoshop, you should be able to do something similar in illustrator. I'd check, but I'm booted up in windows ("This is your brain. This is your brain on windows.") and all my adobe apps are on mac.

    I have an idea and a couple tuts for distressed text. My idea is to duplicate your text layer, rasterize it and apply Filter>Brush Strokes>Spatter. I'd suggest a very light, blurred spatter. Because the prototype seems fairly hard-edged, just messy, I'd probably apply a threshold to the result.

    In other news, tutorials:
    For Photoshop
    A nice video for Frustrator
    A texty tut for 'strator

  2. #12
      gilgamec is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravells
    I'm not sure why its so difficult to reproduce the colours...wouldn't a straight colour picker (say 3X3 average) in photoshop do it?
    I tried it, but was only moderately successful. (There's also colour issues with the conversion from PDF to PNG, for some reason.)

    Quote Originally Posted by ravells
    To get the bleed on the lettering it might with worth trying an outer glow layer style using black / multiply / low opacity....might help?
    Quote Originally Posted by su_liam
    My idea is to duplicate your text layer, rasterize it and apply Filter>Brush Strokes>Spatter. I'd suggest a very light, blurred spatter. Because the prototype seems fairly hard-edged, just messy, I'd probably apply a threshold to the result.
    Both of these are probably good ideas, but I'm using neither Photoshop nor Illustrator; this is is all done procedurally in Asymptote. I'm using Illustrator for rasterization of the PDF (because it's the best tool I've found for the task; some of my experiments are in an earlier thread), but nothing else.
    Really, I'm quite pleased with the results; the distressed and fuzzy text is a slight issue, but given the size of the original (Jamaica is only about an inch and a half long in the atlas), it's probably neither surprising nor a big problem.

  3. #13
      gilgamec is offline
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    Default Next map style

    Another day, another mapping style.

    This one's from my "Reader's Digest Great World Atlas", from about 1960.
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest..png
    The coastline I used on the last map is too low-res, so I had to find a higher-detail one:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica01digest..png Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica02digest..png
    We add in rivers from the same database as earlier. There's again a missing river:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica03digest..png
    Cities:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica04digest..png

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      gilgamec is offline
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    The map has both roads and railroads. (Aha! That was one of the problems with the previous map -- obviously, a map from 1914 would show railroads, not highways!) The railroad database doesn't give us as complete a network as on the old map, so I had to add in a few lines.)
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica05digest..png
    Now roads, from the same database as the last map:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica06digest..png
    Labels:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica07digest..png

  5. #15
      gilgamec is offline
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    A new feature of this map is that it shows altitudes. The levels are at 6000, 600, 150 feet below sea level, and 600, 1500, 6000 feet above sea level. I grabbed a 1km resolution elevation grid and ran a contour finder, giving me these:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica08digest..png
    They're much higher-frequency than (and quite different from) the ones on the old map. (Ah, well, they didn't have satellite radar topography back then.) The complexity looks like it might be too much, but let's put in the fill patterns:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica09digest..png
    Comparing to the original:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest..png

    They compare quite well, I think, with some problems which I'll look at in the next post.

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      gilgamec is offline
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    In the last post I mentioned that there are some issues with the recreation. (Undoubtedly there's lots, but these are the two I'm most irritated with.)

    First, there's a problem with the hatching in the sea area. Take a look at these two details from the maps:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest_sea-.png Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest_sea-.png
    The thing I notice about the original map is that the lines seem to fit nicely together; there's no partial lines, and what lines are there seem to meet up nicely at the corners. This is not at all what the lines in my recreation do, and I'm not certain I know how to get that effect procedurally (or, indeed, manually, at least not without an enormous amount of work).

    The second problem is probably much more solvable. Again, look at these two details, of low-altitude land:
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest_lan-.png Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaicadigest_lan-.png
    They both consist of blue stripes overlaid by yellow ones, but thanks to the magic of subtractive colours, the original map gives us a green! I'm still working on using CMYK to get this effect, but it's not going as well as I'd like; adding the "spot blue" (from the seas) and the "spot yellow" (from the mountains) doesn't give me the green effect I'd like. Work is ongoing to get the lowlands to look right.
    Last edited by gilgamec; 04-22-2010 at 11:34 PM.

  7. #17
      Ascension is offline
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    The lines not meeting up looks like the problem is that they are different. Your vert lines are evenly spaced but your horiz lines have a wide white and thin teal. For the yellow thing, those may have to be on a new layer set to overlay.
    If the radiance of a thousand suns was to burst at once into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One...I am become Death, the Shatterer of worlds.
    -J. Robert Oppenheimer (father of the atom bomb) alluding to The Bhagavad Gita (Chapter 11, Verse 32)


    My Maps ~ My Brushes ~ My Tutorials ~ My Challenge Maps

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      Hai-Etlik is offline
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    Your problem with the green caught my attention as something SVG filter effects could deal with. I know you are using Asymptote, not SVG, but I decided to try anyway.

    Code:
       <filter
           inkscape:collect="always"
           id="filter5355"
           width="1.3999999999999999"
           height="1.3999999999999999"
           x="-0.20000000000000001"
           y="-0.20000000000000001">
          <feTurbulence
             id="feTurbulence5365"
             result="result2"
             baseFrequency="0.25"
             type="fractalNoise"
             numOctaves="4" />
          <feFlood
             id="feFlood5394"
             flood-color="rgb(255,255,255)"
             result="result3"
             in="SourceGraphic" />
          <feDisplacementMap
             id="feDisplacementMap5363"
             in2="result2"
             in="SourceGraphic"
             scale="4"
             yChannelSelector="G" />
          <feGaussianBlur
             stdDeviation="0.80000000000000004"
             id="feGaussianBlur5367"
             result="result5" />
          <feColorMatrix
             id="feColorMatrix5533"
             in="result2"
             result="result6"
             type="matrix"
             values="1 0 0 0 0.5 0 0.5 0 0 0.5 0 0 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0.6 0 " />
          <feComposite
             id="feComposite5392"
             operator="out"
             in2="result6"
             in="result5"
             result="result7" />
          <feMerge
             id="feMerge5541">
            <feMergeNode
               inkscape:collect="always"
               id="feMergeNode5545"
               in="result3" />
            <feMergeNode
               inkscape:collect="always"
               id="feMergeNode5547"
               in="result7" />
          </feMerge>
          <feBlend
             inkscape:collect="always"
             mode="multiply"
             in2="BackgroundImage"
             id="feBlend5357"
             result="result1" />
        </filter>
    Procedural mapping style experiments-map..png

  9. #19
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    OK..I'm loving where this process is taking you - and intrigued by the above svg experiment. Looking good!

  10. #20
      gilgamec is offline
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    Hmmm.... I was going to post a bunch of experiments I did, trying to find the "correct" colours which combine to give the right green impression ... then I actually tried it with the colours I used in the actual map, and got about the right shade of green! (Apparently, I've been looking at the combinations too close-up.)
    Procedural mapping style experiments-jamaica10digest.png
    This is done purely by setting the "yellow" color to 50% opacity.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hai-Etlik
    Your problem with the green caught my attention as something SVG filter effects could deal with.
    This is neat! I'm most interested in how you captured the minor noise-like effects of the paper grain; that's something I hadn't even considered, and yet my brief experiments in that direction do increase verisimilitude. Thanks!

    However, this (and the yellow+blue=green thing, too) does bring up a concern I have: how much should I worry about printing artifacts, or printing processes, in these recreations? The next recreation I'm working on has halftoning, and there's no way I'm going there; I'll just stick to smooth shading of solid colours. But in the 1914 map, I included the waviness of the hatching, and it improved the feel of the map quite a bit. Should I do all of this in a more "simulationist" mode, making all of my colours partly transparent and having the final effect equivalent to inks on paper?

    How far do you go in emulating a map style?

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