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Thread: Apply texture images to repeat them as tiles to fill a layer?

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      broadsword is offline
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    Question Apply texture images to repeat them as tiles to fill a layer?

    I have tileable texture images, which currently are 512 x 512 pixels in size. I have a texture map I'm making for a computer game which is 2048 x 2048 pixels in size.
    When I bring one of these textures into gimp as a new layer, of course it fills only a small portion of the map layer.
    And it's the wrong scale, because if used as-is, each leaf on a bush texture would be 100 yards long once the map is in the game.
    How do I apply a texture so it fills an entire layer, and at the properly scaled size for a map like this?

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      Jaxilon is offline
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    I'm not great at this as I am learning things in Gimp all the time but I think you might start with "Filter>Map>Small tiles". I think I would create a new layer, drop your tile on it, then do that. Then use a mask to have it show where you want it if you don't want the whole thing.

    That's the best I got so if no dice wait for RobA to come along, he's full on Gimp Pro.
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      hohum is offline
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    If you are using gimp you should be able to put the tile image in your pattern folder and then just do a layer bucket fill using that pattern. If the scale of the image "leaves" is off you may have to work with scaling the original tile so that the leaves on it are the right size, then save it at that size to you pattern file. Also if your tileable texture is not that tileable (leaves big ugly seams) get RobA's "better seamless tiles" script, it is much better than the one that comes with gimp.

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      RobA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by broadsword View Post
    I have tileable texture images, which currently are 512 x 512 pixels in size. I have a texture map I'm making for a computer game which is 2048 x 2048 pixels in size.
    When I bring one of these textures into gimp as a new layer, of course it fills only a small portion of the map layer.
    And it's the wrong scale, because if used as-is, each leaf on a bush texture would be 100 yards long once the map is in the game.
    How do I apply a texture so it fills an entire layer, and at the properly scaled size for a map like this?
    Hi broadsword!

    There are few way to do what you want. As Hohum stated you can drop the texture images into your pattern folder and then use them (unscaled) as a fill. Alternately, you can open then and copy them (ctrl-c) then use them as a fill from the "clipboard" pattern which is first in the pattern list.

    If you want them scaled as 1 shot thing, I'd suggest following the link in my sig for the scale pattern script, or click here.

    This will give you a new menu in the pattern context menu (i.e. right click on a pattern) and select "Scale Pattern" which will scale the pattern preserving seamless tiling and either leave it as a clipboard pattern (if the result is <512x512) or save it as a scaled copy of the pattern (it always uses the same apttern name for these temp scaled pattern so they over-write each time).

    If you want to use them often at a fixed scale, I'd suggest scaling all your patterns and saving them as xxx-50.pat, xxx-10.pat for 50 and 10 percent (for example). Remember, scaling a tileable pattern is not trivial, as you can destroy the tileablility on the edges if care is not taken.

    -Rob A>

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