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Thread: Map for a fantasy novel :)

  1. #11
      - Max - is offline
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    50-100 names a hell of a work? Hehe

  2. #12
      Ilunar is offline
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    I did a quick count on my map sketch, and the place name count (including cities, regions, mountains, and seas) currently stands at about 70 names. This is still very much a work in progress however, and I am sure the place names will swell considerably as I continue to work - especially when I start exploring other regions in my next book. Also, I would be happy for the map artist to suggest settlement placements and such on the map, especially if the artist has a good understanding of geography and settelemnt patterns and so on

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    Professional Artist Facebook Connected Schwarzkreuz's Avatar
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    @Max: Sure you know, you are much faster Labeling than I do

    @Ilunar: I am experienced to do proper settlements and cowork with authors to improve their Mapideas. So that shouldnt be a problem.

    {The Mapforge}


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      ravells is offline
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    Heh, the style I'm doing needs labels in the hundreds to look like the map I'm modelling.

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      Chashio is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravells View Post
    Heh, the style I'm doing needs labels in the hundreds to look like the map I'm modelling.
    Not hundreds within the area of a standard sized novel page-spread surely? Along with the rest of the map features?

    I recently read a fabulous couple of books with a map labeling only the most important places, destinations, capitals, and truly massive terrain features... 10 or 15 at most... while all of the passing-throughs, side-trail deviations, and smaller points of mention were given place of reference within the story itself. It was well done, and I imagine it was easier in many regards for the writer of the story. Just something to consider.

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      Lingon is offline
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    I agree with Chashio. A map in a book is different from a stand-alone map; it needs to leave much more to the reader's (and the writer's) imagination, plus there is not a lot of space to work with. The main purposes of a book map should, in my opinion, be to catch the attention of a potential reader picking up the book and to provide some reference points during the reading, without revealing everything.

  7. #17
      Ilunar is offline
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    In the case of my book, the map at the front (or wherever) should be fairly simple - detailed enough to be interesting and to help the reader reference stuff, but it doesn't need to be crammed with detail. A more detailed, color version, for the use as posters and advertising etc., will be commissioned later (or possibly be developed along with the first one?).

    Question: I am also contemplating a map of the local area featured in my book and/or a map of the story's primary city. Have anyone had experience with such additional maps in a novel? The story isn't very map-driven at all, although visual cues (especially when detailing a fantasy world) can be helpful in 'getting it'. Comments?

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      ravells is offline
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    A map in a book is different from a stand-alone map; it needs to leave much more to the reader's (and the writer's) imagination, plus there is not a lot of space to work with.
    Thanks guys, I had never thought of this, but now you mention it, it makes a lot of sense. I would also add that the book is never (or very unlikely) going to mention hundreds or thousands of locations, so it is pointless putting them in the map - they just become visual clutter. All the map should contain is what is mentioned in the book, with maybe a bit more if there are sequels in mind which will mention those places, or where there is some other very good reason for it.

    Ilunar: Many fantasy novels I have read have city maps and area maps. It's not unusual.

    Also, I fear that the style I'm currently working on will not be suitable for your map, so, by your leave, I will remove my hat from the ring. I would like to try your city map though, if you wish.

    best

    Ravs

  9. #19
      Ilunar is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravells View Post
    I fear that the style I'm currently working on will not be suitable for your map, so, by your leave, I will remove my hat from the ring. I would like to try your city map though, if you wish.
    I have an impressive list of interested talents to choose from, so this is no problem at all.



    Here’s a few notes on the city of Freeport where the story takes place (for those of you who might be interested:
    The city will be a mixture of Bronze Age simplicity (thatched roofs, one or two-roomed, wattle-and-daub houses) and Iron Age architecture (including stone and mud-brick constructions, often 2-3 stories high, several rooms, timber or flagstone flooring, frequently with internal baths etc.).

    Think of a setting analogous to Western Europe Bronze Age (i.e. Celts or Proto-Celts), but one where an advanced Iron Age culture (approximately Imperial Rome?) once existed, although the world has since slid back to simpler ways. Still, the memories of older (i.e. more advanced) architecture and craftwork survives, especially among those of wealth and power, although in a limited way. Also, the wealthy and powerful aspire to Eastern (i.e. fantasy-Greek, fantasy-Roman, and even fantasy-Levantine) culture and architecture. So there should be a weird mix of cultures, techniques, and styles.
    To sum up, those of power and wealth will live in dwellings like ancient Pavlopetri (http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/presso...nal_681550.jpg) while the lower classes will live in simpler, typically Bronze Age, dwellings (http://www.oocities.org/zobrien/BA/celtvillage.jpg, http://www.artbarnett.com/images/celticvil.jpeg, Bronze Age Village Museum).

    More specificaly, Freeport is composed of two large ditch-and-embankment encolusres, connected by a wide road which crosses a river via a stone bridge. Furthermore it is a costal city, although the harbor lies outside of the enclosure proper. The city has a population of some 8000, and lies at the head of a deep fjord surounded by towering peaks.

    Did that make sense?
    Last edited by Ilunar; 02-11-2014 at 06:17 AM.

  10. #20
      Lingon is offline
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    No problem Ravs, glad you found it useful

    About the city map, Ilunar, I'd be up for that one too.

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