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Thread: Some lovely Perspective Map references

  1. #11
      Gidde is offline
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    Ahh, I think I get it. So those are perspective views because they get smaller further away, and iso wouldn't?

  2. #12
      geamon is offline
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    From my understanding isometric is actually a drafting term used to describe a 45° angle on the x, y and z from the SE as Rav's said but the term was simply incorporated into cartography as general term for this type of view. Seeing as isometric views are more of a contemporary style in my mind it's more of a general term. Perspective views can represent any angle I believe and from any quadrant and is primarily used to showcase landscape. I could be totally wrong in this assessment. But definitely I do know know isometric is x, y, z, 45°, SE, stupid drafting classes in college.
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      Hai-Etlik is offline
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    Yes, Isometric is a VERY specific projection of 3D space with specific axes onto a plane. The name literally means 'Same Length' as the defining trait is that equal length lines along the axes produce equal length images under the projection.

    It's not just about rotating by 45°. To turn an orthogonal projection along an axis into an isometric projection, you rotate by 30° degrees about one of the other axes, then 45° about the other.

    You could use it to project the 3D globe onto a plane, but as a globe only has one non-arbitrary axis, you have to pick the others, and so It's not really meaningful to distinguish between 'isometric' and any other orthographic projection in this case. Orthographic projections are sometimes used for Hemispheric maps.

    For a large scale map (representing only a small portion of the globe) if you were to use a conventional cartographic projection first, you could then use Isometric meaningfully to indicate relief.

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      Gidde is offline
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    Thanks for clarifying, guys, I really appreciate the explanation(s)

  5. #15
      RobA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hai-Etlik View Post
    Yes, Isometric is a VERY specific projection of 3D space with specific axes onto a plane. The name literally means 'Same Length' as the defining trait is that equal length lines along the axes produce equal length images under the projection.
    So a cube in an isometric projection will have the outline of a regular hexagon:
    Some lovely Perspective Map references-isocube.png

    -Rob A>

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