Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: My first world try (help and critique very welcome)

  1. #1
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Wip My first world try (help and critique very welcome)

    Hi guys,

    This is my first attempt to create a believable world map. I outlined the Teutonic plates and plate pressure. Please let me know if it makes sense in terms of realism. This is a very rough draft - zero details or refinement.


    My first world try (help and critique very welcome)-atlas-basic.png

  2. #2
      Diamond is offline
    Community Leader Gracious Donor
    Facebook Connected
    Diamond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SF,CA,USA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    I'm no geologist (or Teutonic expert... ), but something about the movement(s) of your plates doesn't seem right to me. They all seem to be 'chasing' each other, moving in the same direction. There's hardly any spots where they are either separating, colliding, or sliding against each other, so how, for example, is that massive island chain in the west being created?

    On the other hand, I do like the actual layout of the landmasses themselves quite a bit.
    Last edited by Diamond; 01-10-2013 at 10:54 PM.
    ukie likes this.
    "I like a look of agony, because I know it's true."

    -Emily Dickinson

  3. #3
      Hai-Etlik is offline
    Guild Expert Gracious Donor Hai-Etlik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    48° 28′ N 123° 8′ W
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Well, to start with, it's "tectonic", "Teutonic" refers to a historical ethnic group in what is now Germany.

    To get the motion right you have to think about everything being on a sphere. You can't just take a flat map and push things around in a flat, Euclidean way and have it work out. A "straight line" on a sphere is actually a circle around the centre of the planet (a great circle), and moving in a straight line is rotation around the centre (in particular it's rotation around a line through the centre and perpendicular to the line between you and the centre).

    This is really hard to figure out on a flat map, and the particular kind of flat map is going to make a difference too. A conformal map or a gnomonic map would both have some advantages. Conformal maps preserve angles locally (45° is always 45°) while Gnomonic maps always map great circles to straight lines.

    As an example, if a plate covering the pole is moving south on one side, it must be moving north on the other.

    If your map is meant to be in a global cylindrical projection, then those faults running into the southeast and southwest corners are actually meeting exactly at the south pole as the entire bottom edge is a single point. They are also meeting at an infinitesimal angle. Essentially, an infinitely sharp point. You would also need to match up faults across the discontinuity at the edges which at the moment you haven't.

  4. #4
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hai-Etlik View Post
    Well, to start with, it's "tectonic", "Teutonic" refers to a historical ethnic group in what is now Germany.
    Sorry sometimes spell-check is not your friend but your worst enemy. I think you also meant to say "...what is now Denmark..." not Germany, since Teutons, a Germanic tribe came from Jutland which is presently Denmark... but that's totally off the subject, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hai-Etlik View Post

    To get the motion right you have to think about everything being on a sphere. You can't just take a flat map and push things around in a flat, Euclidean way and have it work out. A "straight line" on a sphere is actually a circle around the centre of the planet (a great circle), and moving in a straight line is rotation around the centre (in particular it's rotation around a line through the centre and perpendicular to the line between you and the centre).

    This is really hard to figure out on a flat map, and the particular kind of flat map is going to make a difference too. A conformal map or a gnomonic map would both have some advantages. Conformal maps preserve angles locally (45° is always 45°) while Gnomonic maps always map great circles to straight lines.
    I see what you mean and that's a great idea I'll definitely try gnomonic projection before transferring it to a flat map. I'm just trying to make it as plausible as possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hai-Etlik View Post

    If your map is meant to be in a global cylindrical projection, then those faults running into the southeast and southwest corners are actually meeting exactly at the south pole as the entire bottom edge is a single point. They are also meeting at an infinitesimal angle. Essentially, an infinitely sharp point. You would also need to match up faults across the discontinuity at the edges which at the moment you haven't.
    Thanks for pointing it out I totally screwed the south pole up.

  5. #5
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamond View Post
    I'm no geologist (or Teutonic expert... ), but something about the movement(s) of your plates doesn't seem right to me. They all seem to be 'chasing' each other, moving in the same direction. There's hardly any spots where they are either separating, colliding, or sliding against each other, so how, for example, is that massive island chain in the west being created?

    On the other hand, I do like the actual layout of the landmasses themselves quite a bit.
    Lol I'm sorry to admit but I'm pretty poorly versed in teutonics myself

    Do you mean to take in account something like mantle's circular movement underneath each plate?

    I'll rework it on a sphere and a gnomonic projection map and try again tomorrow.

    Thanks for your comment

    P.S. Wow. Love your maps. Which program do you use?
    Last edited by ukie; 01-11-2013 at 05:02 AM.

  6. #6
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Ok how about this one. I tried it out on a sphere:

    My first world try (help and critique very welcome)-2nd-try.png

  7. #7
      DragonLord is offline
    Guild Novice DragonLord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Well, it's better but you still have some problems:
    plates can't really "expand" themselves like the 10th one.

    Take exemple with North America plate for exemple: it's created in the Atlantic, move to left and it hurt the Pacific plate where a mountain is created.

    To resume, plates can only move in one direction (but it can be South-South-West for exemple).

    I hop you will understand what I mean.

  8. #8
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DragonLord View Post
    Well, it's better but you still have some problems:
    plates can't really "expand" themselves like the 10th one.

    Take exemple with North America plate for exemple: it's created in the Atlantic, move to left and it hurt the Pacific plate where a mountain is created.

    To resume, plates can only move in one direction (but it can be South-South-West for exemple).

    I hop you will understand what I mean.
    Yes I see. Same problem with 5 and 9. So I think if I move 5 W-SW only, 10 S-SW,E, 9 W-SW only it would fix it. I was trying to avoid them chasing each other (what Diamond commented on).

  9. #9
      Diamond is offline
    Community Leader Gracious Donor
    Facebook Connected
    Diamond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SF,CA,USA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukie View Post
    P.S. Wow. Love your maps. Which program do you use?
    Thank you. I use Photoshop CS2 (soon to be CS6).
    "I like a look of agony, because I know it's true."

    -Emily Dickinson

  10. #10
      ukie is offline
    Guild Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamond View Post
    Thank you. I use Photoshop CS2 (soon to be CS6).
    I particularly love your Dranthia and Kyr maps!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •