Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: A Map of Zanthura

  1. #11
      Chashio is offline
    Guild Artisan Gracious Donor Chashio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Those are pretty mountains! Additional thought for mountain brushes in photoshop... the clone stamp technique is good. Using the history brush tool can also be useful at times, especially if you want to put something into the middle of a mountain range you've already placed.

  2. #12
    Guild Master Gracious Donor Midgardsormr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LampitosGames View Post
    this is the most helpful thing I have seen while I've been on this website. Thank you so much!
    Wow, thanks! I mean, I'm certainly proud of the tutorial, but hearing things like that is a big boost of my confidence!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chashio View Post
    Those are pretty mountains! Additional thought for mountain brushes in photoshop... the clone stamp technique is good. Using the history brush tool can also be useful at times, especially if you want to put something into the middle of a mountain range you've already placed.
    Care to give us a rundown of that process? I know the history brush can do some cool stuff, but I've never taken the time to get to know it.
    Last edited by Midgardsormr; 08-26-2013 at 06:04 PM.
    Bryan Ray, visual effects artist
    http://www.bryanray.name

  3. #13
      Chashio is offline
    Guild Artisan Gracious Donor Chashio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midgardsormr View Post
    Care to give us a rundown of that process? I know the history brush can do some cool stuff, but I've never taken the time to get to know it.
    Sure, or at least I'll try... I'm not that great at explaining things... wordy and roundabout

    The basic concept is that the history brush tool works like the history panel... you can go back to a previous state, but because it's a brush tool you can do it much more selectively.

    You choose the history brush from the tool panel and pick whatever brush settings you want; I often use a grungy brush with some texture to get a similar look to what you can with lifting pigment when watercolor painting, but for my previous suggestion with the mountain brushes I'd choose a hard brush at full opacity to get a clean edge. Add thought, it's a good idea to save any brush settings or other tool you like as a preset (tool presets panel, create a new tool preset button) so you can get it back without fussing endlessly with settings.

    Okay, so the history brush is useless without setting the history point, which you do in the history panel (there's a column of squares on the left side). Pick the point you want to use as your backup. Note that the history tool is somewhat layer-existence specific, so it won't work if you choose a point then create a new layer and try to use it on that layer.

    Once you've figured all that to your liking and you have your history point set, let's say it's at the present, latest point just to illustrate how this works... Paint a stroke with the regular brush tool, or erase a stroke with the eraser, then pluck up your history brush and go back over it. Only the section that you touch with the history brush will be affected back to the point that you chose. Very useful for making little fixes to individual strokes.

    So, in context with the mountain clone stamp (assuming solid mountains), you could put an additional mountain between two existing ones by setting your history point to the present, stamping your new mountain in the place you want and then using the history brush to erase the bits where it overlaps the mountain peaks that belong in front. Of course, if you don't want to use the history brush tool or your intended history point has elapsed for some reason, you could just stamp the mountain onto another layer and mask or erase the bits that don't belong, then merge the layers.

    All make sense? Anyone have a more interesting use for the history brush tool?

  4. #14
    Guild Novice
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Thanks for the history brush tips, came in handy quite a few times today.

    Anyways, quick update before I go to bed. This is what the mountains look like so far. I'm debating whether or not to add some faded color to the mountains, trees, deserts, etc. As always, any critique is much appreciated, suggestions as well; I want this map to be epic!

    A Map of Zanthura-map.jpg
    Chashio likes this.

  5. #15
      Chashio is offline
    Guild Artisan Gracious Donor Chashio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    947

    Default

    That's a nice arrangement of mountains. Try some colors on a small section + separate layer and see what happens... you may have to lighten your parchment some to keep the colors from mudding too much, depending on what coloring method you use.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •