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Thread: Yantas - A Pretty Amateur WIP

  1. #41
      sangi39 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptori View Post
    Ahhhh yes! I had it mixed up - for some reason I was thinking rising air = high pressure when actually it's the opposite. Sorry about that!

    In that case then I think it's all correct.

    Did the Climate Cookbook say what should happen in the tropics in summer? I can't remember whether I had a band of high pressure over both air and land like that, I'll have to go check the files I made again...
    If it does, I haven't managed to spot it A lot of what he writes about seems to apply predominantly to land-masses with central latitudes of around 30 degrees north or south of the equator, which obviously gets more problematic when you want to look elsewhere.

    However, a link provided in the Cookbook contains these two images of Earth:





    So, what seems to be happening, on Earth at least, is that in July there is a continuous band of generally high pressure south of the equator and then another one north of the equator in January both at around 30 degrees N or S. However, it also suggests that even within these continuous bands, we find differences in pressure, dropping off between the centres of high pressure, which thinking about it makes sense
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    That's cool, makes a lot of sense! In which case yeah, I'd say your pressure maps look correct

    Imagine how much easier this would be if you could just create a height map for your world and shove it into a program that works this all out for you...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptori View Post
    That's cool, makes a lot of sense! In which case yeah, I'd say your pressure maps look correct

    Imagine how much easier this would be if you could just create a height map for your world and shove it into a program that works this all out for you...
    It would be pretty nice, but I get the feeling that to have it done well, that program would have to be fairly big. There's a model of the climate of Middle Earth by someone at Bristol University that, IIRC, used supercomputers that are used for developing real-world climate models to make predictions regarding future climate change

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    Yeah I remember reading about that - people were surprised that the climate models matched the description from the book; clearly Tolkien did his homework in that area too! If only someone on here had access to those supercomputers, maybe they could sneak some tests in for us

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    Reading through your development process was really interesting! I have almost no knowledge of climatology and plate tectonics so I found your post title really misleading.

    I feel like I need to go through the climate cookbook soon, before I finish my world and throw in something too nonsensical. Also, I'm impressed by anyone who has the patience to make a conlang. I like making conscripts but a whole language has always seemed to be a bit too much.

    Anyway, Really impressive work so far.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flocko View Post
    Reading through your development process was really interesting! I have almost no knowledge of climatology and plate tectonics so I found your post title really misleading.

    I feel like I need to go through the climate cookbook soon, before I finish my world and throw in something too nonsensical. Also, I'm impressed by anyone who has the patience to make a conlang. I like making conscripts but a whole language has always seemed to be a bit too much.

    Anyway, Really impressive work so far.
    Thanks very much The only problem I've had so far is a general lack of feedback, which makes me hesitant to actually finalise anything. I go as far as I can with what I can gather first from the Climate Cookbook and then other resources on-line regarding how things work on Earth, but I'm not sure enough on my ow with what I come out with to go much further

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    The plate tectonics and climatology stuff is awesome! But I think your lack of detailed feedback is because not very many people here start from the tectonic plates and build up the way you're doing. For myself, I've a single class of geology and no climatology at all, so I haven't the faintest idea what to tell you about all that.

    By the way, what on earth is a "conlanger"? I've never heard the word before.

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    I think you should go ahead and finalise anyway, it's what I did

    I basically followed the steps you went through here (but arranged the tectonic plates *after* shaping the continents , silly me), then the last few steps from the climate cookbook, and then made it into a map (this one here) without asking anyone first... I actually found it a lot easier to judge whether or not it looks right when it looks like a real map rather than a visualisation of some guesses at the data. That said, it's really nice to see the steps, and people seem to find those bits interesting, so posting updates as you go is probably the better approach if you want help making sure it's all correct

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    Quote Originally Posted by wdmartin View Post
    The plate tectonics and climatology stuff is awesome! But I think your lack of detailed feedback is because not very many people here start from the tectonic plates and build up the way you're doing. For myself, I've a single class of geology and no climatology at all, so I haven't the faintest idea what to tell you about all that.
    Good point

    Quote Originally Posted by wdmartin View Post
    By the way, what on earth is a "conlanger"? I've never heard the word before.
    It's a term referring to a person who creates "conlangs", i.e. "constructed languages". Currently well-known examples would be Klingon from Star Trek, Esperanto, Dothraki from Game of Thrones and Na'vi from Avatar.

    Quote Originally Posted by raptori
    I think you should go ahead and finalise anyway, it's what I did

    I basically followed the steps you went through here (but arranged the tectonic plates *after* shaping the continents , silly me), then the last few steps from the climate cookbook, and then made it into a map (this one here) without asking anyone first... I actually found it a lot easier to judge whether or not it looks right when it looks like a real map rather than a visualisation of some guesses at the data. That said, it's really nice to see the steps, and people seem to find those bits interesting, so posting updates as you go is probably the better approach if you want help making sure it's all correct
    Sounds like a plan my therapod friend

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      sangi39 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by sangi39 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by wdmartin View Post
    By the way, what on earth is a "conlanger"? I've never heard the word before.
    It's a term referring to a person who creates "conlangs", i.e. "constructed languages". Currently well-known examples would be Klingon from Star Trek, Esperanto, Dothraki from Game of Thrones and Na'vi from Avatar.
    To show how far I've gotten with the conlang I'm currently working on for this world, here's the alphabet, followed by the phonemes, i.e. sounds, those letters represent in slashes and then the romanisation, i.e. the way of transcribing those letters using the Latin alphabet, hence "romanisation", in angled brackets.



    Code:
    /a e i u o    t tʲ d dʲ  k̠  k̟  g̠  g̟   kʷ gʷ  p b/
    <a e i u o    t ty d dy  k  ky g  gy  kw gw  p b>
    
    /ə    s sʲ  x̠  x̟   xʷ  f    n nʲ  m    w j    r rʲ  l lʲ/
    <ė    s sy  h  hy  hw  f    n ny  m    v j    r ry  l ly>
    
    : velkasta :  yantas  :
    : sirden   :  velas   :
    : hwestun  :  gyunari :
    : kovur    :  akyeru  :
    (Velkasta and Sirden are continents, Velas is the systems parent star, Hwestun is one of Yantas' two moons and Gyunari and Akyeru are two planets. Kovur is the name of a species of sapient, bipedal wolf-like creatures which primarily inhabit the continents of Mistaya and Hungas (with humans inhabiting Sirden and Arenda with some co-habitation going on in Konyur. As of yet, Velkasta is uninhabited).

    The superscript <j>s indicate palatalisation, a feature found in Russian and Irish Gaelic for example, while the superscript <w>s indicate labialisation, i.e. a simultaneous rounding of the lips. The little "-" and "+" signs are difficult to explain but it effectively means that there are two "k"-like sounds, one slightly further back and one slightly further forward respectively. This distinction also applies to "g" and the "x" which indicates a voiceless fricative similar to that found in the word "loch" or "bach". The exact nature of the distinction is dependent on dialect, with the "standard" dialect distinguishing them on the basis of "velar" vs. "palatal". More conservative dialects have a "velar" vs. "uvular" distinction while others almost merge the two series of sounds (indeed, later descendent languages developing from these dialects, as well as a few which maintained the velar/uvular distinction, did merge the two series).

    The syllable-structure is fairly simple, being CV(T) where C is any consonant (optional when word-initial but obligatory word-internally), V is any vowel and T is one of /m n s r l w j/ where /m/ and /n/ assimilate to match the point of articulation of following plosives, nasals and fricatives, e.g. /np/ > [mp], /mn/ > [nn], /ms/ > [ns], etc. but /mr/ > [mr], /nw/ > [nw], etc.

    Palatalisation is distinct from clusters of a consonant with a following /j/. Such clusters are rare given the restriction on syllable coda consonants and only /s.j n.j r.j l.j/ vs. /sʲ nʲ rʲ lʲ/ occur. The majority of descendent languages neutralise this distinction, but a few keep them distinct.

    The script required several innovations when applied to other languages. For example, one of the most prominent daughter languages, known for the moment as "Chad" (from PRK *rjandė), has the following phoneme inventory:

    /p t k kʷ/
    /b d g gʷ/
    /m n/
    /f s ʃ h hʷ/
    /v z ʒ ɣ ɣʷ/
    /w r l j/

    /i i: i:ə u u: uə/
    /e e: e:ə o o: o:ə/
    /ɛ: ɛ:ə ɔ: ɔ:ə/
    /a a: aə/

    Those sounds appearing in bold-italics have no counterpart in PRK while those in italics have close counterparts in PRK. The latter can thus be easily represented with the original PRK alphabet while the former must be indicated either by digraphs, trigraphs or diacritics which did not appear in the PRK alphabet.

    To show the relationship between the two languages, some example (random) vocabulary can be used:

    Code:
    *ryandė   [rʲan.də]    > tyad   [tʃad]
    *kusan    [ku.san]     > huzan  [hu.zan]
    *nyal     [nʲal]       > yal    [jal]
    *fasėn    [fa.sən]     > vazan  [va.zan]
    *fasėndė  [fa.sən.də]  > vazįd  [va.za:d]
    *ikwėl    [i.kʷəl]     > ihwal  [i.hʷal]
    *ėstar    [əs.tar]     > star   [star]
    *ėstarda  [əs.tar.da]  > starda [star.da]
    *daytan   [daj.tan]    > täsan  [tɛ:.san]
    *daytanda [daj.tan.da] > täsada [tɛ:.sa.da]
    *pawga    [paw.ga]     > fåka   [fɔ:.ka]
    *bondyė   [bon.dʲə]    > pody   [podʒ]
    *fajela   [fa.je.la]   > väėla  [vɛ:ə.la]
    *fanhela  [fan.xe.la]  > vayela [va.je.la]
    ...

    And that's more or less it so far. I'm not sure yet where either of these languages will be spoken, but there you go
    Last edited by sangi39; 03-07-2014 at 09:12 AM.
    flocko and groovey like this.

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