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Thread: A Map of Shadows

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      Diamond is offline
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    Post A Map of Shadows

    This is a map I did early last year for a friend's alternate history writing project (which, sadly, he has not completed ).

    Tried to go for a softer, faded look here, though I think I should've made the creases look more random and 'distressed'.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A Map of Shadows-mapofshadowsfinal.png  

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      ravells is offline
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    I really do like the muted colour scheme you've used here. One easy way to get natural looking creases is just to get a white piece of paper fold it, unfold it and then scan it. Put it on it's own layer (either multiply or overlay blend mode - can't remember) and there you go. If you want to be a real perfectionist you can mesh warp the image so it fits the creases too but most of the time I don't think anyone would notice.

    Welcome to the Guild btw - fascinating maps and subject matter.

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    Community Leader Facebook Connected Steel General's Avatar
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    Looks pretty nice, I think someone posted a nice fold/crease tutorial (or maybe a graphic overlay) recently.
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    Guild Member ironmetal250's Avatar
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    Tripoli and Cyrenacia, as well as most of the north african states, have extremely weird borders. Borders of states/countries are usually either in straight lines or jagged edges, very rarely along a curve.

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      Karro is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironmetal250 View Post
    Tripoli and Cyrenacia, as well as most of the north african states, have extremely weird borders. Borders of states/countries are usually either in straight lines or jagged edges, very rarely along a curve.
    I don't think those are meant to be hard borders, really. South of those borders is land occupied by various "desert tribes". I think when your land borders a nomadic, ill-defined, or porous peoples, then your "borders" with them are going to be nomadic and porous - basically the border is where your defensible settlements end or where the extent of your authority and influence drops below a certain threshold.

    Basically, I think you're right that borders between sovereign nations with governments that can reach the entirety of their claimed lands tend to be along straight lines or follow "jagged" natural boundaries, but I don't think "desert tribes" counts as a sovereign nation in the traditional sense.
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      Diamond is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karro View Post
    I don't think those are meant to be hard borders, really. South of those borders is land occupied by various "desert tribes". I think when your land borders a nomadic, ill-defined, or porous peoples, then your "borders" with them are going to be nomadic and porous - basically the border is where your defensible settlements end or where the extent of your authority and influence drops below a certain threshold.

    Basically, I think you're right that borders between sovereign nations with governments that can reach the entirety of their claimed lands tend to be along straight lines or follow "jagged" natural boundaries, but I don't think "desert tribes" counts as a sovereign nation in the traditional sense.
    Got it in one.

    Although historically the Ottoman Empire laid claim to just about all of North Africa, their influence south of the coasts was poor at best. It wasn't until the European powers really got crazy with the whole colonialism thing in the late 19th century that those places were 'claimed'.

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    Guild Member DungeonMasterGaz's Avatar
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    This is a beautifully rendered map. It reminds me of the sort of thing you might get in an alternate history, strategic-level boardgame. Perhaps like Diplomacy, or something.

    I hope you get to use it in some way.

    DMG

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      Diamond is offline
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    Thanks! I appreciate it.

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