Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Why Photoshop & not Illustrator?

  1. #11
    Guild Novice 7thDirection's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Shepherdstown, WV
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Out of the two Adobe programs, I prefer Illustrator because that is the software we used to make maps in my college cartography class (we also used Freehand, but I never quite got the hang of it). I could see how Photoshop would be better at making textures and depth on a map, though I would still make the initial linework and text in Illustrator.

    *´¨)
    ¸.´¸.*´¨) ¸.*¨)
    (¸.´ (¸.` ¤ 7thDirection


    .

  2. #12
      Larb is online now
    Guild Artisan Larb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    921

    Default

    My new job has forced me to learn illustrator pretty quick and it is something of a pain sometimes especially as I prefer raster mediums. However, one of my favourite features of illustrator is the Live Trace function which I've found is very very useful for making vector images of maps an line drawings I have first made in SAI or Photoshop. It's a very easy function to use too and great if for some reason you need a vector based map but find it frustrating to use illustrator in depth.

  3. #13
      AlanShutko is offline
    Guild Novice
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    St Louis, MO, USA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I like using Illustrator, although I'm only a very beginning mapper here. Graphic styles and symbols make it quick and easy to throw together things once you get some stuff together.

    When I was playing in a Temple of Elemental Evil game, I did the mapping real-time on illustrator (and shared the screen to an iPad so others could see the map). It's not the most pretty map, but I think it turned out well for being real-time.

    One thing I forgot to mention: I found the Illustrator Essential Training by Morty Golding on lynda.com to be extremely helpful in understanding how Illustrator works. It has a very idiosyncratic interface, but it has a pretty strong internal logic. Once I understood that logic (where tools tend to be, the common key modifiers things use, the Appearance panel, etc) Illustrator began to make a lot more sense to me and became easier to use. Today, I often get frustrated at work doing something in Visio or another Microsoft program, because it would be so much easier to do in Illustrator (once you know how).

    Lynda.com is pricy but I think it's worth it. It has good training on many creative apps and the videos worked much better for me than the books did.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Why Photoshop & not Illustrator?-t1.pdf  
    Last edited by AlanShutko; 06-11-2011 at 11:28 AM. Reason: Added training info

  4. #14
    Publisher Gamerprinter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, IL, USA
    Posts
    3,618

    Default

    While I don't use Illustrator, rather I use Xara Xtreme Pro 4 (Xara Designer 7 is its most current iteration), it is also a vector drawing application rather than an image editor like Photoshop/GIMP. However, as anyone can attest looking at my maps, many assume I am using an image editor. It seems fairly common in Illustrator maps to look like Illustrator maps, but it really doesn't have to. It depends if you use photo textures as image fills, or apply painterly techniques in vector drawing. I use Xara to create all my maps, and I am a pro fantasy cartographer.

    Relying on vector apps give me speed in creation, low resource usage from complex images, exportable to any pixel dimension (in image editors once you set the pixel dimension of your map, you are pretty much limited to that dimension only. Pixel dimension means nothing in vector until you export the image). I can create a map then save it twice, once for VT use say 800 to 2000 pixels wide, or print ready 300 dpi for a 24 x 36 print (thus 7200 x 10800 pixels) from the same original file.

    I sometimes use Photoshop to tweak a texture for an image fill, and rarely for tweaking a final map, I almost exclusively use vector apps in the creation of my maps. Note my most common style involves hand-drawn pen lines that are scanned and imported to Xara, with vector based beveled shapes, texture fills and drop shadows placed beneath the hand-work for a hybrid hand-drawn and vector digital style.

    GP
    Gamer Printshop - We print RPG Maps for Game Masters!
    http://www.gamer-printshop.com

    Kaidan setting of Japanese Horror (PFRPG) Google+ community

  5. #15
      Greggory is offline
    Guild Applicant
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    3

    Default I Prefer Vector

    Another big advantage of using Illustrator is for Lightwave users. The vector graphics easily import into this 3D application for conversion into 3D space. While it is possible to place pixel images into Lightwave for tracing there, items drawn in Illustrator can be easily resized and edited there while maintaining smaller file sizes. Also lines imported from Illustrator can be directly used as part of the working 3D drawing.

  6. #16
    Guild Apprentice Terraformer_Author's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Eastern U.S.A.
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Why not use GIMP? It's free - and comparable in qaulity to at least Photoshop 7? It's always been a mystery to me why people think that Photoshop is the "end all - be all" of editors.

  7. #17
      tilt is offline
    Community Leader Facebook Connected tilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Trelleborg, Sweden
    Posts
    4,657
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terraformer_Author View Post
    Why not use GIMP? It's free - and comparable in qaulity to at least Photoshop 7? It's always been a mystery to me why people think that Photoshop is the "end all - be all" of editors.
    I believe it much depends on what you use the program for. If you just edit your holiday photos for printing on your homeprinter (or at the photo-store), or make stuff like maps and the like, I'm sure GIMP is just as good as Photoshop - and personally I still miss the brush-pipe-function that GIMP has, thinking photoshop brushes really are missing the ability to have colored brushes. That being said - if you use the program for professional work, then you will probably be sorry not to have the CMYK color option when you work with GIMP - that is definitly a major reason for using photoshop (in addition to the partners you might work with might use adobe also and send you files for that.)
    But if GIMP can do the work - I see no reason to spend the money on Photoshop. I sure would like to save the to many dollars I pay every 1,5 years for the program, especially since adobe charge double in Denmark than they do in the US (for the same program).
    regs tilt
    :: My art on Deviant Art :: My mapping blog tilts fantasy maps :: My work Catapult - Perry & Gehrke - EasyTruckIT ::
    :: Finished Maps :: WIP Cartographia - Breakwater -Market -Lands of Twilight -Battle City :: Competion maps Iron Giant ::
    :: FREE Tiles - Compasses :: Other Taking a commision - Copyright & Creative Commons ::
    Works under CC licence unless mentioned otherwise

  8. #18
      RobA is offline
    Administrator RobA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Niagara, Canada
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tilt View Post
    I believe it much depends on what you use the program for. If you just edit your holiday photos for printing on your homeprinter (or at the photo-store), or make stuff like maps and the like, I'm sure GIMP is just as good as Photoshop - and personally I still miss the brush-pipe-function that GIMP has, thinking photoshop brushes really are missing the ability to have colored brushes. That being said - if you use the program for professional work, then you will probably be sorry not to have the CMYK color option when you work with GIMP - that is definitly a major reason for using photoshop (in addition to the partners you might work with might use adobe also and send you files for that.)
    But if GIMP can do the work - I see no reason to spend the money on Photoshop. I sure would like to save the to many dollars I pay every 1,5 years for the program, especially since adobe charge double in Denmark than they do in the US (for the same program).
    I'd also rather see people use Gimp rather than:
    - Pirating PS cause they can't afford it (which I think >50% of people using PS are doing)
    or
    - Using a student version of PS outside of what the student licensing allows (cause they can't afford the non-student version)

    Just my 2 cents.

    -Rob A.

  9. #19
      jfrazierjr is offline
    Community Leader jfrazierjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Apex, NC USA
    Posts
    2,963

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RobA View Post
    I'd also rather see people use Gimp rather than:
    - Pirating PS cause they can't afford it (which I think >50% of people using PS are doing)
    or
    - Using a student version of PS outside of what the student licensing allows (cause they can't afford the non-student version)

    Just my 2 cents.

    -Rob A.
    Agreed... there is no excuse for pirating PS when GIMP is free and can do most of what PS can do and a few things it CAN'T.
    My Finished Maps
    Works in Progress(or abandoned tests)
    My Tutorials:
    Explanation of Layer Masks in GIMP
    How to create ISO Mountains in GIMP/PS using the Smudge tool
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    Unless otherwise stated by me in the post, all work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

  10. #20
      cantab is offline
    Guild Journeyer
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terraformer_Author View Post
    Why not use GIMP? It's free - and comparable in qaulity to at least Photoshop 7? It's always been a mystery to me why people think that Photoshop is the "end all - be all" of editors.
    People equate price with quality. "The more expensive one will be better", "If they're giving it away it must be not good enough for them to sell", "How can something free be as good as something you pay for" - these are the attitudes people have. Attitude's born from physical products with real manufacturing costs, but not applicable to software where all the expenditure is in R&D and the actual cost of producing a copy is negligible. Hence, people choose to pirate Photoshop.

    Plus GIMP has a reputation as being hard to use. It was a bit counter-intuitive back in the day, but the software's moved on since and adopted a more conventional UI.

    Photoshop is superior for professional print work, that I will grant, but the features that give it that aren't relevant to making graphics for computer display, or even for home and office printing.
    I am a geology nerd.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •