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Thread: How to get your rivers in the right place

  1. #31
      loogie is offline
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    yeah at times you can actually hear the buzzing outside.
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  2. #32
      pickaboo is offline
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    I'd like to make notice of the fact that the lakes from the ice age glacier retreat can be temporary if shallow enough. Here in Finland I have seen a few examples of shallow lakes that slowly die because they turn to swamps.

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    Link Stream Capture

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stream_capture
    Stream Capture (also known as Stream Piracy) is pretty sweet.

    -Rob

  4. #34
      pickaboo is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by HandsomeRob View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stream_capture
    Stream Capture (also known as Stream Piracy) is pretty sweet.

    -Rob
    Grazy, and lakes can do that as well.

  5. #35
      withlyn is offline
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    Lakes are common in some areas, generally those with previous glaciation (Canada, Sweden), tectonic rifting (Africa, Baikal) or an extremely high water table (Florida, Louisiana). Mountain lakes are generally some combination of rift lakes and glacial lakes. Volcanic crater lakes are always fun in an adventure, but are relatively rare within any given region. Elsewhere, most lakes and ponds are formed by manmade dams.

    Furthermore, all lakes are subject to eventual siltation. Fast-moving water from the incoming rivers and streams is able to suspend a lot of sediment, but when the water slows down in the lake, that sediment gets dropped, gradually filling up the lake. Depending on the size of the pond/lake relative to the size of the basin it drains (and thus its incoming sediment load), this can take anywhere from a few hundred years (Lake Nasser in Egypt, for instance) to millions of years (Lake Baikal, the African rift lakes). To be truly "realistic" then, a fantasy map should have large numbers of lakes only in regions that are swampy, mountainous, or show signs of geologically recent glaciation.

    Although the info about lakes not being found on ridge lines and only draining to one river is generally valid, Isa Lake (actually more of a pond) in Yellowstone National Park is situated on the continental divide at Craig Pass, and actually has two outlets, one which flows to the Pacific Ocean and one which flows to the Atlantic.

    Also in Wyoming is Two-Ocean Creek, which splits into two distributaries, one which flows to the Atlantic, and the other to the Pacific.

    Just because these things can happen doesn't mean they are normal, or that you would expect them to happen with big lakes or rivers; if you put something like that in a map, make it special!
    Last edited by withlyn; 06-26-2009 at 05:43 PM.

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    Killer post wythlin! I figured there were exceptions to the rules but wasn't quite sure where to look for them. Awesome contribution to this thread. Repp'd!

    Welcome to the guild, .
    Last edited by Feralspirit; 06-26-2009 at 10:12 PM.
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      Ascension is offline
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    Wonderful. Now everyone will be quoting this whenever we talk about splits
    If the radiance of a thousand suns was to burst at once into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One...I am become Death, the Shatterer of worlds.
    -J. Robert Oppenheimer (father of the atom bomb) alluding to The Bhagavad Gita (Chapter 11, Verse 32)


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  8. #38
      waldronate is offline
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    According to descriptions, Isa Lake only flows in two directions when the water level rises in spring. Two Ocean creek does flow in two directions, but it more seeps out of its meadow on the continental divide than actively splits as we often see in maps here.

    Both features are small enough that they wouldn't be visible except on very small local scale maps. The general rules about rivers and lakes aren't affected and budding cartographers should still not be cut any slack for infractions.

  9. #39
    Guild Master Gracious Donor Midgardsormr's Avatar
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    Crosslink to another post with interesting information: The worst river violations ever...

    Juggernaut1981 talks about river behavior, deltas, and Australian sand rivers. Also, Gamerprinter brings up the topic of underground rivers.
    Bryan Ray, visual effects artist
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  10. #40
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    Post The Great Lakes are rising

    I learned something on a National Geographic show a few weeks ago that the Great Lakes are rising. At first no one was sure why, and a small science post on Lake Ontario proves the truth of the matter, that the Great Lakes have been rising an inch per year for the last 10,000 years.

    Apparently, during the last Ice Age, 4 miles (?) of ice sat above what is now the Great Lakes. The tremendous weight of this ice actually pushed the crust downward hundreds of feet lower than lands south of the Great Lakes. Now that the ice is gone, the crust is still gradually "healing" itself and rising to eventually attain the proper elevation. Thus the Great Lakes are rising. Actually some of the Lakes are getting deeper, while the majority of them are getting shallower.

    There's evidence of submerged forestland in about 40 feet of water beneath Lake Huron. This is where its getting deeper. There's a tilting effect caused by the crust rising to the north of it.

    I hadn't previously heard of this phenomenon. I found it extremely fascinating and since we seem to be talking River Police (and lakes in the above post) issues lately. I thought I'd add this to the conversation.

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